Nasty neck/headaches post-workout on desk days.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 09, 2009 1:14 PM GMT

    On days when I hit the weights for my upper body, especially when I work my back, and then have to sit at a desk all day, I almost always end up with a really nasty neck and headache. It feels like the muscles across the top of my back and up into my neck are just too tight, and that causes the pain. Ibuprofen fixes it . .. but I'd rather not be munching on those every couple days.

    I stretch before and after my work out, try and maintain good office posture and move around every hour or so.. but I'll still get sore. It can make me a little hesitant to go quite as hard at the gym on days I work, and I really don't want to be going easy.

    So any tips? Do I need to be investing in regular massage.. or is there a particular kinda stretch or something for the upper back/neck that is really good.. or might it be my form, or...?
  • UncleverName

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    Jul 09, 2009 8:18 PM GMT
    I'm sort of struggling with this myself.

    Chiropractic has helped me in the past, but hasn't been lately.

    I also have shoulder problems, and upper back problems, and just imbalances in general.

    I'm trying massage now, in conjunction still with chiropractic, as well as trying to do some rehabilitative exercises (for my upper back and shoulders).

    I'm also trying to be regular doing hot yoga. That usually seems to help on the day of the yoga.
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    Jul 09, 2009 11:20 PM GMT
    You're not lifting properly and have an imbalance going.

    Think about how you are lifting and the agonist and antagonist group.

    Talk with someone who knows what they're doing.

    This should be easy to fix.

    It could be as simple as doing some neck exercises.

    It could be as simple that you are lifting in bad form.

    Only someone up close, and with some common sense, can tell.
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    Jul 10, 2009 9:10 AM GMT
    chuckystud said

    You're not lifting properly and have an imbalance going.

    Think about how you are lifting and the agonist and antagonist group.





    Hmm. I KNOW my form is good because I do a session with a personal trainer once a week, rotating through each exercise, and he's strict on technique and very happy with the way I execute my lifts.

    The agonist/antagonist grouping is a good point though - I'll discuss it with my PT.


    And yeah. Maybe a chiropractic assessment would be wise..
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    Jul 11, 2009 7:31 AM GMT
    check out this article on here

    http://www.realjock.com/article/1321/

    Stroll down to chest,lats,spine wall test. Give it a go. It seems to loosen thing up for me when exercise won't.
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    Jul 11, 2009 7:57 AM GMT

    The key question here is, 'What is the diagnosis' not in the sense that this is a disease but rather 'what is wrong here'. The unusual feature is the headaches. The responses so far have mentioned most of the options. But common things occur commonly and rare things hardly ever happen*. I suspect that the neck pain is to do with the lifting and they may simply be DOMS. What is it like on day 2 post training? I can't account for the headache on the information you provide.

    Incidentally it is interesting that you stretch before your workout. There is now good evidence that pre-exercise stretching is is actually harmful in that it reduces rather enhances performance. The important thing is a a 5 to 10 min CV warm up at about 60% maximum heart rate. Post-exercise stretching is of course crucial in improving flexibility.

    Do discuss this whole thing with your PT

    * when I was med student I diagnosed a rare disease in a patient when in fact he had something very common. The surgeon took me to the window. There were some birds on the sidewalk. 'Are they sparrows or canaries?' he asked. 'Sparrows, sir', I replied.
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    Jul 11, 2009 12:26 PM GMT
    Devontrainer is one of the more qualified people on the site, btw, being both an MD and a personal trainer.

    A word on the massage option: at certain points a monthly massage is not a luxury. Some people´s jobs/training are such that it is basic common sense to get one. I´m not a huge fan of chiropractors (one of the tell tale signs I´m not american as you guys are almost religious about your chiros). I´ve had treatment, it didn´t do a great deal. Find a good massage therapist who does sports massage, thai massage or shiatsu. They can do amazing things.
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    Jul 12, 2009 3:59 AM GMT
    Prudent.
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    Jul 12, 2009 2:12 PM GMT
    Lostboy saidDevontrainer is one of the more qualified people on the site, btw, being both an MD and a personal trainer.

    A word on the massage option: at certain points a monthly massage is not a luxury. Some people´s jobs/training are such that it is basic common sense to get one. I´m not a huge fan of chiropractors (one of the tell tale signs I´m not american as you guys are almost religious about your chiros). I´ve had treatment, it didn´t do a great deal. Find a good massage therapist who does sports massage, thai massage or shiatsu. They can do amazing things.


    Lostboy - you are over generous but thanks.

    Absolutely agree about getting a regular. proper sports massage. The odd thing about massage is that the evidence for the physiological basis on which it is supposed to work is very flimsy. But the fact is that it does work which is one reason why elite sports guys have their own masseurs.

    The key here is to get a properly trained masseur. A proper massage takes an hour but it is time and money very well spent.
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    Jul 12, 2009 3:24 PM GMT
    devontrainer said The odd thing about massage is that the evidence for the physiological basis on which it is supposed to work is very flimsy. But the fact is that it does work which is one reason why elite sports guys have their own masseurs.

    The key here is to get a properly trained masseur. A proper massage takes an hour but it is time and money very well spent.


    ha.. I don´t find it odd at all. THere are lots of things that work and we can´t prove why. It is at this point that a positivistic and rigid "science only" mentality is a weakness.