So I'm feeling REALLY down about unemployment/job search for a year now, and could use some advice...

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    Jul 10, 2009 11:42 PM GMT
    Normally I keep a good attitude about being unemployed and looking for work, and apply to at least 5 jobs a week, part time and full time.

    I was offered an interview for the first time since October today, and within an hour they called back cancelling it because I can't start until August 1 (fuck you, Outgames).

    I'm feeling REALLY down right now because of it, and wanted to know of any advice anyone could give me to cheer up about this seemingly fruitless search.

    --Mike
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    Jul 11, 2009 12:40 AM GMT
    I feel your pain man. I was in the same situation last year and went without a job in eight months. My previous job ended without notice because the owner of the resort I was building went bankrupt. At first, it was cool because I had tons of time to spend in the gym, I got a trainer, was losing lots of weight, and basically having a good time. But, after several months of watching my bank account get smaller and smaller, I started to stress really bad. I could barely sleep, was depressed all the time, etc...

    In the end, I finally got another job and all was good again. I guess my best piece of advice would be to try and keep yourself busy so you don't worry about your situation too much. Set aside a certain amount of time daily to send out resumes, call people, etc.... Basically, treat it like your job. Do it religiously every day.

    Once you are outside your "search for a job" time frame, do something else. Hang out with friends, work out, read a book, go to the beach, etc... Just don't let the job search consume your entire life or you'll go mad.

    Hope that helps some. Good luck though!! I might be in a similar situation in several months as the resort I'm building now is almost complete. Now that I think about it, I might start looking for a new job now.
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    Jul 11, 2009 1:10 AM GMT
    keep looking. your not the only one and always remember there are people in much worst situations than you.
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    Jul 11, 2009 2:45 AM GMT
    When I was unemployed I applied to about 5 jobs a day, not a week. How are you looking for job postings? If you are waiting for the help wanted ads in the paper, it is too late. Find a few companies you like and keep an eye on their employment page on their web site. Tailor each cover letter to the company, showing a genuine interest in them and the job. Don't be afraid to apply for jobs you don't think you are qualified for. Each cover letter, each custom resume is practice. A well written application will stand out over the form letters people send.
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    Jul 11, 2009 4:42 AM GMT
    If you are just replying to posted positions, then you are being reactive in your job search and being like everyone else. Try to get your target organizations, know what the positions are that are there that you would be appropriate for, know the skills needed and have your stories of what you've done in the past that show you already have these skills. Then make sure that you start trying to find people in these organizations who can get to know you and vouch for your skills.

    You want to be there before the job opens. You can keep trying to chase the posted job, but it's like the train has already left the station, and you're running after it. You have to be there and ready before the job is posted. Only 20-30% of all jobs are filled through posted positions. Stop going after the bad percentages.

    Mike, contact me off-forum if you wish, and I can give you some pointers. Hell, I helped GuerillaSodomite get a job!
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    Jul 11, 2009 5:26 AM GMT
    matt45710 saidIf you are just replying to posted positions, then you are being reactive in your job search and being like everyone else. Try to get your target organizations, know what the positions are that are there that you would be appropriate for, know the skills needed and have your stories of what you've done in the past that show you already have these skills. Then make sure that you start trying to find people in these organizations who can get to know you and vouch for your skills.

    You want to be there before the job opens. You can keep trying to chase the posted job, but it's like the train has already left the station, and you're running after it. You have to be there and ready before the job is posted. Only 20-30% of all jobs are filled through posted positions. Stop going after the bad percentages.

    Mike, contact me off-forum if you wish, and I can give you some pointers. Hell, I helped GuerillaSodomite get a job!


    Yes he did! It wasn't my dream job of operating a bolt gun at the end of the line at a slaughterhouse that turns people who have trouble operating the self checkout registers at grocery stores into Soylent Green, but it keeps the lights on and protein powder in the cupboard.
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    Jul 11, 2009 6:19 AM GMT
    I'm right there with you. Been unemployed since last September. I was turned down by McDonald's of all places because the manager said he didnt want to invest in someone with my education only to have me leave for a better position. pfft...So hit me up if you know of anything I can do. I am even considering taking the Civil Service exam and uprooting...icon_confused.gif
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    Jul 11, 2009 6:58 AM GMT
    Having filled in for some time in the job of reading applications (notice, I just filled in the job for a while, but I think I did learn something that might very well serve me in the future and that is worth sharing), I can say that matt45710's and MunchingZombie's are excellent advice:

    -If you are reading about it in a paper, yes, the train is already moving.
    -A very well written resume/application is gold.
    -In writing these things, practice is valuable even if you don't get the position.

    The day before the jobs were published in the internal newspapers of the university I work for I already had more than five applications and at least one outstandingly well written... and when I say outstanding I mean blow-my-socks-off-in-awe at the guy's ideas.

    Twice I passed those very well written thought-outside-the-box applications with strong recommendations and heavily underlined and in one instance he got the job after the first interview with the rector halting the process very early (the other professor had already accepted another job abroad when we contacted him).

    On the other hand, have you considered seriously having a business or project of your own? The tired saying that a crisis is also an opportunity to try new approaches is, nonetheless, very true.
  • ursa_minor

    Posts: 566

    Jul 11, 2009 7:48 AM GMT
    ¨AuthorEngineer said

    A very well written resume/application is gold


    There are dozens of advises on the web how you should write these up (monster has one). Make-or-break as its the first thing the employer sees. Keep your hopes up!
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    Jul 11, 2009 5:56 PM GMT
    first of all, chin up . . .

    secondly, don't be afraid or too proud to take a manual labor job . . . it could be very good for your mind and body to work with your hands . . . i worked in a warehouse once and i was never so ripped as I was then . . .

    and a bright guy in a blue collar environment could get noticed quickly and maybe promoted quickly . . .

    so, put yourself out there and just go with it . . .
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    Jul 11, 2009 6:23 PM GMT
    I hate it too!! I'm always broke! but I'm grateful that I don't have to pay bills or rent. So, I'm just going to wait until mid august when all the high schoolers go back to school and drop their jobs and hopefully I will be find something. I don't care what it is. I applied to work at a Sex shop.errr so not me but,I told myself I would get use to seeing Vagina's as I rewind the video tapes.

    What I do to keep my spirits up is avoid the news when they talk about the economyicon_neutral.gif


    But if your not as lucky as me and have to pay bills. Take anything you can find. I use to go on craigslist and found tons of jobs. I found one along time ago as a dishwasher that pays 8/hr but I didn't apply because the lady was mean on the phone. Next time I will just deal with the bitchiness and be happy to get a pay check. Also, you have to watch out for what people put out their on that website.
  • Latenight30

    Posts: 1525

    Jul 11, 2009 7:00 PM GMT
    Pound the Pavement. Go to biz. Don't just rely on monster or the internet. Hit places so they see you are serious. Keep the chin up.
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    Jul 11, 2009 7:14 PM GMT
    TheIStrat saidNormally I keep a good attitude about being unemployed and looking for work, and apply to at least 5 jobs a week, part time and full time.

    I was offered an interview for the first time since October today, and within an hour they called back cancelling it because I can't start until August 1 (fuck you, Outgames).

    I'm feeling REALLY down right now because of it, and wanted to know of any advice anyone could give me to cheer up about this seemingly fruitless search.

    --Mike


    Sounds like you made a distinct choice that the "Out Games" were more important to you than becoming unemployed. You made the choice; now you're living with it.

    Life is seldom fair; folks are rarely logical, nor use common sense, but, it's the way of the world.

    You should learn a lesson from today, and increase your frequency of applications, considerations various occupations from parking cars to waiting tables to night stocking, etc. You may have to combine a variety of job search methods. You should consider it a numbers game (selling yourself). The more contacts the make, the more the chance of success.

    Self pity is going to get you miserable and now where, FAST.

    There's as saying that's applicable across the board on most any goal. If things are not working then you MUST change how you're attacking the issue. It's that simple.

    Yes, economic times suck, but, sitting around feeling sorry for yourself, and walking away from a job for the "Out Games" is hardly the right approach.

    You might wish to really sit and re-think your priorities. In this case, you chose the Out Games over immediate employment, and now you're crying. You need to seriously examine your priorities.

    Most all of us have done this at some time or another. I turned down a nearly six figure job last fall so I could help Logan. Looking back, I likely could have helped him better with all that money.

    Don't kick yourself to much. It won't help any. Just think it through better next time and weigh your possible outcome; make your choice; live with it. Life really is that simple.
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    Jul 11, 2009 8:24 PM GMT
    I agree with an earlier poster re: volunteer work. . .

    1) It's a good thing to do anyway. . .

    2) You'll network and meet people who may be able to help you get a job...

    3) You'll fill in your resume during this "blank" period.

    Try to find some kind of volunteerism that is in some way related to your profession.

    Another thought, along the same lines: Go to a company where you would like to work. . . and offer yourself free, as a gofer / intern. That way you're on the inside when something comes up, and if you've done a good job, you'll probably get it.

    I realize it's working for free, but it's way better than doing nothing.
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    Jul 11, 2009 9:35 PM GMT
    contact your school president alumni.......they usually have eyes and ears in places.
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    Jul 11, 2009 10:28 PM GMT
    Mike, I was in your situation whem I was a few years older than you (yeah, a long time ago). I couldn't even get a job as a supermarket checker. What broke the drought for me was calling friends, friends of my parents, and stopping in at places where I worked when I was in school. I hated to use people to get a job, but people were glad to be helpful.
    Don't overlook the government, esp since you are in metro DC. Pick some agencies that interest you and go in and look at the postings on the bulletin boards or in the human relations (employment) offices. There are usually a decent number of jobs posted at the Library of Congress. for example. Maybe you can do this online nowadays. Best of luck.
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    Jul 11, 2009 11:38 PM GMT
    You must be doing something wrong in the interviews. Are you throwing poo at the interviewer? Seriously man, you should probably analyze why no one will hire you out of a years applications. Im not meaning to sound like an ass but there is definitely something wrong. Are you too picky. If you are living at home, maybe you are tooooo comfortable? Are you looking for a specific job? Its impossible to not find something in a year. Even homeless guys go to day labor and sell newspapers.
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    Jul 12, 2009 12:03 AM GMT
    Friends I graduated with are still looking for work, which depresses them like non-other. Unfortunately, many allow their depressed state to permeate into their overall disposition, which becomes clear during interviews.

    Try to keep a positive outlook, go for a long run to clear your mind, and know that you are not alone. Perhaps start a search in other sectors which aren't necessarily linked to your career/"path", until you can pick yourself up.

    You seem like a very bright and positive person, you should have no problem finding a job.

    Best of luck!

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    Jul 12, 2009 12:16 AM GMT
    Hey man... It's understandable that you're depressed about not finding a job. What I suggest you do is:

    1. Like everyone said, try to find a place where you can do voluntear your time.

    2. Look into going back school and having unemployment pay for it.

    3. Go to unemployment and find out about the services they provide to help you locate a position.

    4. Go back to your college and look into their job placement program.

    5. Send out more than 5 resumes a week. You should be sending out at least 15 resumes to prospective employers a week (if possible).

    6. Look into possibly relocating to a different city/state if you can.

    All the best to you man... Don't worry, you'll find something soon enough. Just keep your head up.
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    Jul 12, 2009 12:44 AM GMT
    TheIStrat saidNormally I keep a good attitude about being unemployed and looking for work, and apply to at least 5 jobs a week, part time and full time.

    I was offered an interview for the first time since October today, and within an hour they called back cancelling it because I can't start until August 1 (fuck you, Outgames).

    I'm feeling REALLY down right now because of it, and wanted to know of any advice anyone could give me to cheer up about this seemingly fruitless search.

    --Mike


    Here's some advice: Don't tell a potentail employer anything about availibility until well after the interview stage. Sort that out if and when they offer you a job. And plan ahead as to what you will say. Think up some cheesy, yet professional sounding phrase such as, "I have a personal commitment in late July but can start immediately after that."
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    Jul 12, 2009 12:52 AM GMT
    what are you looking to do? some jobs are hard to find period. maybe you want to try some'm else until the dream job comes.
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    Jul 12, 2009 1:24 AM GMT
    One thing that I really try to emphasize with the people I work with is to stop focusing so much on sending out resumes. I know it sounds counter-intuitive, but resumes work best as a confirmation of you, instead of a calling card. When you send a resume to a posted position, your resume goes in a pile. Your job is to get out of the pile. Because it's so easy to send resumes electronically now, these piles are huge and difficult for hiring managers to get through. I say to find your targets, do send your resumes into the appropriate channels there, but utilize your time to try to get to know people in the organizations who can say good things about you and get your resume noticed out of the pile.

    No matter how stellar the resume is, you are more persuasive in person saying things to someone.
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    Jul 12, 2009 1:25 AM GMT
    freakofnature said


    Here's some advice: Don't tell a potentail employer anything about availibility until well after the interview stage. Sort that out if and when they offer you a job. And plan ahead as to what you will say. Think up some cheesy, yet professional sounding phrase such as, "I have a personal commitment in late July but can start immediately after that."


    Totally agree with this advice. Get them to love you first, then negotiate.