Having more than one passport....or a residency of another country. Its thare any advantages?

  • zakariahzol

    Posts: 2241

    Jul 11, 2009 2:24 PM GMT
    I come across some lucky people in Real Jock with this privilege. Having 2 nationality. Or he is a nationality on one country and residency of another. I am a little bit envious of this people. I mean you can live in this country and move to another one if thing dont work out.

    However with the world getting more borderless this sort of things dont carry a lot of advantage anymore.( I can easily live, buy property, retire in a cheaper neighbouring country if I wanted too despite having just one passport) . I imaging there disadvantages too, like paying taxes to both country and how about retirement program (for example social security in USA) .

    Is anyone here more than one nationality or residency? Do you feel it somehow have a positive impact to you life?
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    Jul 11, 2009 4:18 PM GMT
    A good friend of mine was born in Portugal shortly before his family arrived in the US. He has passports from both countries. So when this "California-lookin, Portugeese speaking" white boy goes to Brazil for fun, he travels under the Portugeese passsport, mostly for safety. US passports can be "red flags" in other parts of the world which is why travel companies like Magellans sell classy leather passport cases without the eagle on them (and with the spy blocker built in so that the info on the passport's chip can't be read covertly).
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    Jul 11, 2009 5:20 PM GMT
    I have residency in two countries, and because one of them is European I can live and work anywhere in the EU. Cuts out bureaucracy, that´s about it (though it´s not a small issue)
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    Jul 11, 2009 5:47 PM GMT
    Just cuts down on line time when you travel to another country where you have dual-citizenship or a passport.
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    Jul 11, 2009 5:54 PM GMT
    yes there are several advantages. I have 3 myself

    as pinny mentioned you can sometimes transit thru immigration quicker. also there are times when you can get buy stuff cheaper - eg hotel rooms stays, than you could as a non citizen.
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    Jul 11, 2009 6:03 PM GMT
    I was born in Germany to a German citizen(Mother) and a American citizen(Father) I Don't even know If I still have my German citizenship anymore The citizenship laws over there are confusing(plus they change them every 10 years). I know I only have an American passport because I got mine in America. If anyone could answer my question that would be nice.icon_smile.gif


    But I personally think it would be a pain in the ass moving back and fourth between countries. I would just Live in one and visit one a lot if I was home sick or whatever.
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    Jul 11, 2009 7:42 PM GMT
    Wouldn't there be an advantage if you had citizenship in a country that had public healthcare? I'm sure there are specific rules to this, but I would imagine that you could go back to your other country in case you need serious medical treatments that would be too expensive in your current country.
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    Jul 11, 2009 7:48 PM GMT
    Would make it easier when the revolution comes to get out of the country quicker, especially since the border with Canada is harder to sneak across now. Not that I'd ever condone such behavior or know the best farm roads to use.
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    Jul 11, 2009 8:12 PM GMT
    Damn! I should have thought of that trick too!
  • ceosion

    Posts: 15

    Jul 11, 2009 8:32 PM GMT
    Figured I'd throw this out there, one disadvantage, though it's fairly specific to your employment goals in life, is that if you hold more than one citizenship, it will disqualify you from obtaining government clearance. As it currently stands, you cannot have ties to another country while working in such a capacity for the US government.

    Again, depends on your personal employment choices/goals. icon_cool.gif I had the opportunity to be dual citizenship from Thailand and the US, but eventually turned 18, never made the choice, and just kept my solo US citizenship. Got put up for clearance about a month ago, and noticed that clause, so I'm glad I avoided it altogether. (For those who are wondering about this further, I'd look up the "Adjudicator's Desk Reference" for more specific information. I do believe that if you go for a job that requires clearance, but you have dual or more citizenship, you can renounce the other citizenships and then you'll be clear after a certain amount of time has passed. Again, for those who are seriously concerned about this, look up the desk reference on Google.)
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    Jul 11, 2009 9:31 PM GMT
    I have dual citizenship both in the us and England. Makes life much easier when visiting home.
    Cheers,
    Keith
    icon_twisted.gif
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    Jul 11, 2009 9:34 PM GMT
    Yes, I agree, dual citizenship is VERY helpful. I have Spain and US and residency in Argentina.

  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    Jul 11, 2009 9:34 PM GMT
    I had temporary Canadian residency for the last three years to go to school, but there weren't any real advantages to it. I just thought it was cool! icon_biggrin.gif
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    Jul 11, 2009 10:02 PM GMT
    Dual-citizenship isnt always a blessing. My friend is both American and Israeli...given the political situation, She usually only carries the American Passport during travel.
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    Jul 11, 2009 10:36 PM GMT
    I've a british passport.. it makes living in europe a none issue and many of the commonwealth countries too

    traveling these days is easy as pie..

    living in another country is a whole different matter, I can go live anywhere within Europe baring a select few (which I wouldn't wanna live in anyway)

    Ive no interest in living in the US, however I do want to live in Canada.. mind you to move there anyway..

    and hopefully one day I will live in Europe icon_biggrin.gif
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    Jul 11, 2009 10:40 PM GMT
    lilTanker said
    Ive no interest in living in the US


    But, but, but...it's almost impossible for a an American to get citizenship in Australia...how will we ever get married??? icon_sad.gif

    *sigh*

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    Jul 11, 2009 10:43 PM GMT
    Joecifer said
    lilTanker said
    Ive no interest in living in the US


    But, but, but...it's almost impossible for a an American to get citizenship in Australia...how will we ever get married??? icon_sad.gif

    *sigh*



    You may want to reconsider living in Oz. I thought about doing this as well until I tasted the tap water in Adelaide. That was the end of any such thoughtsicon_exclaim.gif
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    Jul 12, 2009 1:56 AM GMT
    I was born in Australia, and a few years ago took out British citizenship (my mother was born in Scotland). It's pretty advantageous in that I can live and work anywhere in the EU whenever I want; friends of mine had to rush off to the UK to get work just before they turned 30 because there is some limit on getting work visas with age.
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    Jul 12, 2009 2:53 AM GMT
    because im registered in two different countries, and because Greece sucks balls when it comes to admin, i have two separate identities...

    2 different credit ratings baby!
  • zakariahzol

    Posts: 2241

    Jul 12, 2009 3:05 AM GMT
    From the feedback I receive here, I guess it not really a big deal. If all the advantages you got, is faster immigration, somethings cool to have., two separate identity, (why , are you a criminal?). Probably the ability to work in different country are beneficial to me, if I am a young person looking for job. As it is , I am happy with what I have and have no reason to work in other country.

    I am happy with just one passport.
  • NickoftheNort...

    Posts: 1416

    Jul 12, 2009 3:50 AM GMT
    I am a citizen of the USA and of Norway; the former gives me immediate access to the US (one of the major countries in our current world), while the latter gives me access to a social democratic state and to the European Union.

    Even if I were to be convicted of a crime, I would still retain access to the US (a recent series of ads in Norway use the threat of denied access to the US as a deterrent against tagging and graffiti). I also do not have to apply for a visa to work or study there.

    It has had a positive impact on my tuition costs for when I studied in the States and been useful for when I've visited family (and been good on my student loan access when studying whether in Norway or in the US). I imagine it may be useful when I finally start a career, if such a career demands inter-continental travel.

    I only pay taxes to Norway at this point (though I've recently learned that the IRS wants US citizens abroad to submit tax forms, even if they have no income that is taxable to the US). Having met up for service in the Norwegian draft (and being deemed unnecessary in peacetime), I do not have to serve in the US military even if there is a country-wide draft.
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    Jul 12, 2009 3:53 AM GMT
    I dont think dual citizenship has immediate advantages; I see them as fringe benefits. For example, I can apply for jobs overseas that I would normally be excluded from. And I put on my resume that I have dual citizenship, because while it make not be directly related to any job I am going for, you never know where your resume is going to end up...
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    Jul 12, 2009 10:16 PM GMT
    Joecifer said
    lilTanker said
    Ive no interest in living in the US


    But, but, but...it's almost impossible for a an American to get citizenship in Australia...how will we ever get married??? icon_sad.gif

    *sigh*


    Fear not my big hunky fella.. when we wed, you'll be coming to live at my shack
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    Jul 12, 2009 10:18 PM GMT
    Blackguy4you saidYou may want to reconsider living in Oz. I thought about doing this as well until I tasted the tap water in Adelaide. That was the end of any such thoughtsicon_exclaim.gif

    You where in Adelaide..... WTF do you expect man.. it's like the freakin almost back waters of Australia.. I mean, dear heavens man, Melbourne at least if not NSW

    UGh I'd never live in Adelaide it's like redneck USA

    I'm soooo gonna get killed by someone
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    Jul 13, 2009 3:09 AM GMT
    All i can say is dont try to cross the American border at Detroit with dual citizenship . . . and yes, if you were wondering, they are the type that get angry when you (rightfully) insult their intelligence.