Buddhism???

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 12, 2009 6:03 AM GMT
    So I was just wondering if there are any Buddhists out there in RealJock land. I have been encountering this "religion" if you will quite frequently since I first heard of it.

    Just wanted to hear other people's experiences with the teachings of budha?

    What your opinions of it might be?
  • FITBOY101

    Posts: 62

    Jul 12, 2009 5:16 PM GMT
    I belong to SGI International. Which is a Buddist Sect. According to what region the sect originates from it may be different than what most people think of when they think buddist. For instance the Tibetan buddists, and different from the chinese, or the vietnamese or the japanese, and so on.
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    Jul 12, 2009 5:29 PM GMT
    I am not Buddhist, but of all the major religions it seems to be the most tolerant. I never heard of a Buddhist burning someone (except for themselves) because they disagreed with someone's belief.
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    Jul 12, 2009 5:33 PM GMT
    i practice with buddhist deities, as well as hindu and christian. there is a small buddhist monastery by my house, and a larger one not much farther away.

    i personally haven't worked with the buddha or studied the teachings that closely. i mainly work with the deities, avalokiteshvara (quan yin) mainly. i have been to a vajradaka fire puja and that was well done.
  • swogdog

    Posts: 143

    Jul 12, 2009 5:34 PM GMT
    I've been a Theravada (Southern School) Buddhist for nearly 20 years. I served as a practice leader for the New York Insight Meditation Center and as co-instructor of the Dharma Punx in NYC. Needless to say, Buddhism is a big part of my life; although in the last year I have not been leading meditations, as my life is focused elsewhere.

    Sitting and Walking meditation have entirely changed me for the positive. Regardless of whether or not one buys into the whole "nirvana, escape from the rounds of rebirth" thing, everyone can benefit from increased clarity of vision and a more loving heart - two things that basic Buddhist practices lead to.

    For more info on the Theravada school and for access to online Buddhist texts from the oldest portion on the canon you can check out this site:

    http://www.accesstoinsight.org/begin.html

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    Jul 12, 2009 5:38 PM GMT
    On a personal level the Buddhist I've knows are some of the kindest and nicest people I have ever meant. They are willing to talk about their faith without being preachy. This seems in compared to Christians I've meant where it seems a roll of the dice what type person you will meet.
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    Jul 12, 2009 5:43 PM GMT
    BrandonPhilip said
    Buddhist teachings are like air. They are free, and non-discriminating. If anyone thinks they are beneficial, then they can breathe the air. If anyone chooses otherwise, then it's up to the person. This is the "religion" of Buddhism....Truth, Peace, Harmlessness, and Freedom. A more appropriate term to describe Buddhism is "humanism". It deals with the peaceful conduct of human lives.


    Agreed. I've never actually seen Buddhism as a religion. It always just seems to emphasize the way we live our lives, or should live it. Thanks for this post. It has rekindled a forgotten interest.
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    Jul 12, 2009 6:32 PM GMT
    I have been a Buddhist my whole life (Theravada to be exact) and it is a very big part of the culture I grew up in. Even though I don't consider myself to be super religious, Buddhism influences the way I think since it has been taught to me from a very young age. I do love many of the ideas presented in the religion since they make a lot of sense to me. I know that meditation is amazing and that you can really relax yourself and think more clearly. Unfortunately, I'm not really good at it.

    It is so interesting to see people from other parts of the world take interest in Buddhism. I didn't know so many of you knew about it. The only weird thing for me is seeing it explained or discussed in English since I've only ever experienced it in South Asian languages. If someone asked me to explain something about it in English, I'd be so losticon_biggrin.gif

    Yes, it is more like a philosophy, I guess, but in Buddhist countries it is considered 'a religion' and it greatly influences the culture as well. Btw, not all Buddhists are good, kind people. I've met tons of nasty ones too. Its just like any other group of people I guess.

    I can tell you that I am very thankful to have grown up in a Buddhist environment because I was never taught that being gay was sinful or wrong. Never. I can't imagine what that would have done to me. Culturally, however, it is looked down on and never really talked about. So, coming out still is no easier.

    Anyways, thanks for bringing up the subject.

  • TallGWMvballe...

    Posts: 1925

    Jul 12, 2009 6:34 PM GMT
    Well said, BrandonPhillip.
    The posts following yours seem to justify what you said about "freedom"

    My experiences with Buddhism have been similar to what you guys have related.

    There are some who try to make it ritualistic which bothers me a bit IE: guys in funny clothes telling you to ring bells, burn certain incense, and donate money to their group of course.

    I DO like the base philosophy of harmlessness and being at peace by eliminating hate in your life.
  • jrs1

    Posts: 4388

    Jul 12, 2009 6:41 PM GMT
    While I'm not a practitioner, I am researching the religion and others. I enjoy its message and the underlying principles. Like all things, it's not perfect, but seeing as society in constantly in flux - sui generis, perhaps it is the " religion " needed in order to dissent against the overwhelming views of status quo.
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    Jul 12, 2009 6:47 PM GMT
    I've read buddhist teachings for almost a decade, I don't see it as a religion, more a way of living.

    Simple truth about buddhism, if more people were buddhist the world would be a nicer place. Where as radical christians and radical muslims preach hate and intollerance, radical buddhists would preace extreme peace, that would be a world I wanted to live in.


    peace x
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    Jul 12, 2009 6:52 PM GMT
    I edited a Buddhist text early on in my career, and spent some time over the years after studying the religion (casually, not formally) and seeing how it fit with my life. Many of the principles, especially non-attachment, were fascinating. I think they pushed me forward spiritually and emotionally. I soaked up what wisdom I could from it and moved on, grateful for the lessons.

    It's an amazing religion, but I couldn't find the discipline to pursue it full on. Still, you can learn a lot from an exposure to Buddhist teachings without become a full-fledged Buddhist. This is true of many other religions, but I found Buddhism to be the most positive in its outlook.
  • TallGWMvballe...

    Posts: 1925

    Jul 12, 2009 7:10 PM GMT
    WOW, dashdashdash, "radical buddhists would preach extreme peace"

    What a great concept! That would certainly be a world for me as well.

    We should all try to live with extreme peace!
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    Jul 12, 2009 7:35 PM GMT
    I've studied a lot of Buddhism, and though I'm still an atheist by definition, of any major religion, Buddhism coincides the most with my personal beliefs.

    I remember taking this really long quiz/survey a few years back (I wish I could still find it) that concluded I was exactly 1/3 Buddhist, 1/3 Atheist, and 1/3 Satanist. As a compassionate, rebellious, free-thinker who doesn't believe in God, it makes sense, lol.

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    Jul 12, 2009 7:59 PM GMT
    aboycalledhero said
    BrandonPhilip said
    Buddhist teachings are like air. They are free, and non-discriminating. If anyone thinks they are beneficial, then they can breathe the air. If anyone chooses otherwise, then it's up to the person. This is the "religion" of Buddhism....Truth, Peace, Harmlessness, and Freedom. A more appropriate term to describe Buddhism is "humanism". It deals with the peaceful conduct of human lives.


    Agreed. I've never actually seen Buddhism as a religion. It always just seems to emphasize the way we live our lives, or should live it. Thanks for this post. It has rekindled a forgotten interest.


    Agreed with the 2 posters above, I'm a Buddhist all my life. It's more like a way of living. Some simple principles/concepts are:

    . You should do good deeds in the world (no killing other animals, human beings...etc).
    . Don't reject all temptations and don't give in to all temptations to have a balanced Zen-like state of mind. (not too much sex, money, power ... etc - but balance enough to make you happy and be Zen in the moment).
    . Buddhists believe that the basic human principle is good. One should try to reach for our own enlightenment/nirvana state.
    . Truth, Peace, Harmlessness, Freedom and Humanism - Yes, they're all in there.
    . Buddhism does not teach hate or intolerance against gays/homosexuals, so it's a little less rigid than say - Christianity. icon_cool.gif
    . Go to any Buddhist temple, you will see how Zen-like it is.
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    Jul 12, 2009 8:23 PM GMT
    SexySwimmer said
    aboycalledhero said
    BrandonPhilip said
    . Buddhism does not teach hate or intolerance against gays/homosexuals, so it's a little less rigid than say - Christianity. icon_cool.gif
    . Go to any Buddhist temple, you will see how Zen-like it is.



    Actually, I think it depends on which Buddhist you speak to. The Dalai Lama is very strongly against homosexuality, but you are correct in stating that he does not advocate violence against homosexuals.

    He states in this interview (near the end of the video) that "Buddhism rejects homosexuals. As with Christians, genuine Buddhists believe that same sex acts are sexual misconducts. It is not allowed." Basically, he was saying that if you're gay, you're not a buddhist, no matter what you call yourself.

    http://www.cbc.ca/sunday/2007/11/110407_1.html
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    Jul 12, 2009 10:27 PM GMT
    I have read Buddhist literature for the past 25 years. I like it from a philosophical perspective but do not believe in mechanical rituals, reincarnation or even religious leaders. In other words as a religion I don't care for any of that.

    Everyone is supposed to already have the Buddha mind or Buddha nature. So from that perspective no one can give you an experience that can only happen in your own mind. As the old proverb goes "If you meet the Buddha, kill him!"

    Taoism appeals to me more as there is really no central exaltation of a religious leader expect where it has merged with "folk religion" In the whole Tao Te Ching there is really no mention of Lao Tse, it's supposed author who may or may not have existed.

    I do like Buddhist art though and mythology in general.
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    Jul 12, 2009 10:54 PM GMT
    ActiveAndFit saidI have read Buddhist literature for the past 25 years. I like it from a philosophical perspective but do not believe in mechanical rituals, reincarnation or even religious leaders. In other words as a religion I don't care for any of that.

    Everyone is supposed to already have the Buddha mind or Buddha nature. So from that perspective no one can give you an experience that can only happen in your own mind. As the old proverb goes "If you meet the Buddha, kill him!"

    Taoism appeals to me more as there is really no central exaltation of a religious leader expect where it has merged with "folk religion" In the whole Tao Te Ching there is really no mention of Lao Tse, it's supposed author who may or may not have existed.

    I do like Buddhist art though and mythology in general.


    It's actually an example of distortion by the followers. Buddha himself never claimed godhood, he described himself as simply 'awake'. And yet he is venerated as a god by modern Buddhists. With people erecting giant statues of him and doing shortcuts of prayers (prayer wheels, prayer flags, mandalas, etc.)

    The gods of Buddhism as well as their demons are just as caught up with karma as the mortals. And thus are still 'asleep'.

    Although some of what seems to be superficially mechanical prayers are actually more of a primitive way of self-hypnotism than actual shortcuts.
  • reload16

    Posts: 267

    Jul 13, 2009 12:28 AM GMT
    I actually don't care for any of the organized religions out there and don't really believe into the "leaders"

    But I have been kind of curious about buddhism because it always preaches peace within one's self and for some reason that draws me in. lol


    anyone have any suggestions for a book or website to check out to learn about buddhism?
  • danisnotstr8

    Posts: 2579

    Jul 13, 2009 12:32 AM GMT
    Buddhism is a nice stepping stone toward atheism. I think that Buddhism is something we all become interested in when we realize that organized religions are a crock of shit.

    The teachings of Buddha are simple truths that we should all have in common; they are extensions of the Golden Rule.

    You can read about it and pretend to "change" your religion or "become" a Buddhist, but really, you're just denying the inevitable: Religion is bullshit.
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    Jul 13, 2009 12:59 AM GMT
    I cried while reading Shantideva's "The Way of the Bodhisattva."

    Theravada is represented here by lots of folks, but I'm more situated within the Mahayana and Tibetan schools. For me, these are not stepping stones towards atheism nor is Buddhism similar to the golden rule. "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you," is different than "I am the cause of others suffering and choose to no longer inflict harm on others." There is more agency and ownership within Buddhism than 'the not wanting to be hurt' of the golden rule.
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    Jul 13, 2009 1:01 AM GMT
    The tenants of Buddhism are simple and just address the basic truth of suffering .. Also I guess you can say it addresses the nature of self which has a lot in terms of psychology and awareness:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_noble_truths 1. The Nature of Suffering (Dukkha):
    "This is the noble truth of suffering: birth is suffering, aging is suffering, illness is suffering, death is suffering; sorrow, lamentation, pain, grief and despair are suffering; union with what is displeasing is suffering; separation from what is pleasing is suffering; not to get what one wants is suffering; in brief, the five aggregates subject to clinging are suffering."
    2. Suffering's Origin (Samudaya):
    "This is the noble truth of the origin of suffering: it is this craving which leads to renewed existence, accompanied by delight and lust, seeking delight here and there, that is, craving for sensual pleasures, craving for existence, craving for extermination."
    3. Suffering's Cessation (Nirodha):
    "This is the noble truth of the cessation of suffering: it is the remainderless fading away and cessation of that same craving, the giving up and relinquishing of it, freedom from it, nonreliance on it."
    4. The Way (Mārga) Leading to the Cessation of Suffering:
    "This is the noble truth of the way leading to the cessation of suffering: it is the Noble Eightfold Path; that is, right view, right intention, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, right concentration."

    It makes a lot of sense to me .. but the fourth noble truth I am not so keen on because it is more method than "truth"

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    Jul 13, 2009 1:12 AM GMT
    Sedative saidThe gods of Buddhism as well as their demons are just as caught up with karma as the mortals. And thus are still 'asleep'
    Like many other non-theistic philosophies, the deities came from mixing with local beliefs and religions.

    Here is a good wiki entry on theism in Buddhism:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/God_in_Buddhism
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/God_in_BuddhismSince the time of the Buddha, the refutation of the existence of a creator has been seen as a key point in distinguishing Buddhist from non-Buddhist views. Buddhism is usually considered a religion, but is also commonly described as a "spiritual philosophy", because it generally lacks an Absolute creator god. The Buddhist approach is clinical and systematic.


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    Jul 13, 2009 1:16 AM GMT
    Also, Tibetan Buddhism (i.e. Dali Lama) is actually a mixture of the local religion of Tibet "Bon"
    BönOften described as the shamanistic and animistic tradition of the Himalayas prior to Buddhism's rise to prominence in the 7th century, more recent research and disclosures have demonstrated that both the religion and the Bönpo are significantly more rich and textured culturally than was initially thought by pioneering Western scholars.[citation needed] Some scholars do not accept the tradition that separates Bon from Buddhism; Christopher Beckwith calls it "one of the two types of Tibetan Buddhism" and writes that "despite continuing popular belief in the existence of a non-Buddhist religion known as Bon during the Tibetan Empire period, there is not a shred of evidence to support the idea... Although different in some respects from the other sects, it was already very definitely a form of Buddhism."
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    Jul 13, 2009 1:23 AM GMT
    ActiveAndFit said
    Sedative saidThe gods of Buddhism as well as their demons are just as caught up with karma as the mortals. And thus are still 'asleep'
    Like many other non-theistic philosophies, the deities came from mixing with local beliefs and religions.

    Here is a good wiki entry on theism in Buddhism:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/God_in_Buddhism
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/God_in_BuddhismSince the time of the Buddha, the refutation of the existence of a creator has been seen as a key point in distinguishing Buddhist from non-Buddhist views. Buddhism is usually considered a religion, but is also commonly described as a "spiritual philosophy", because it generally lacks an Absolute creator god. The Buddhist approach is clinical and systematic.




    Correct me if I'm wrong. But the pantheon of Buddhist 'gods' I think are primarily Hindu, am I right? The different levels of heaven and hell and the mortal realm of Hinduism becoming integrated into the karmic cycle. But with the primary goal being true death, rather than simply getting into heaven. Although reincarnation as a deity in the heaven 'layers' is also considered a good enough goal.