I retract my previous statements.....

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 13, 2009 4:52 AM GMT
    There is 6"+ of shitty water in my bathtub. Apparently my dishwasher somehow backed up and it clogged the pipe that drains my dishwasher, sink, and bathtub. So I've done everything.... plunger, pipe auger, Drain-o, and now I'm going to try using the auger at a different drain, but if that doesn't work, I'm afraid I will have been defeated. I'm clearly not fit to be called a man. Please don't think too horribly of me, and allow me to at least keep my testicles as a remembrance that I used to be a real man =(
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 13, 2009 4:55 AM GMT
    I am bitterly disappointed in your manliness..
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 13, 2009 5:00 AM GMT
    i'm far more disappointed in your plumbing. this doesn't sound like your fault
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    Jul 13, 2009 5:08 AM GMT
    Don't let him off Jack, he's gotta fix it *nods*

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    Jul 13, 2009 5:26 AM GMT
    dancerjack saidi'm far more disappointed in your plumbing. this doesn't sound like your fault

    In the plumbing's defense.... it's an old house, so there's not a whole lot to be done, and as I rent as opposed to own, there's not much I can do about the plumbing.

    In other news, I tried my best to get at it from another drain (I'd been unsuccessfully trying to get it from the bath tub drain). The sink worked no better for me. I'm trying to decide whether or not I want to attempt going to the basement and dissecting the tub pipe to try and get it from there.........
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    Jul 13, 2009 5:40 AM GMT
    Ah hah! I just discovered that my sink drain has a clean out plug for the sink's drain in my basement. I just got really giddy about that......
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    Jul 13, 2009 5:44 AM GMT
    you are creeping ever closer to gaining some respect again..
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Jul 13, 2009 5:46 AM GMT
    " and as I rent as opposed to own,"
    _______________________________________________
    Here.
    Let a REAL man solve your problem.
    Call the damned landlord !
    Clogged plumbing is his responsibility, not yours.

    Have a nice day.
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    Jul 13, 2009 5:48 AM GMT
    DUDE!!!
    You RENT!
    CALL THE LANDLORD or HIS PROPERTY MGR!
    IT is their JOB to look after the functioning of the property...including the plumbing!
    I'm not questioning your masculinity....just your willingness to take on someone elses work that they are PAID to handle?


    Opening that clean out plug is gonna be GROSS! EEWWWWW! STINKY! BARF! icon_eek.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 13, 2009 5:52 AM GMT
    OMG its a blocked drain not neurosurgery..

    If he can do it himself, he should.. if it ends up beyond his skills then he should call someone
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    Jul 13, 2009 6:24 AM GMT
    I rent a house, not an apartment, and my landlord is pretty hands off. We pay all the bills and handle the home upkeep. Since I am pretty handy and can fix most things on my own, we've gotten cheaper rent since in the 2 years I've lived here I haven't yet met a problem I can't solve on my own or with a quick trip to the hardware store. If it does get bad enough to where I do have to call a plumber, I will get in touch with my landlord informing her of that and requesting reimbursement for the plumbing fees.

    So we'll see. I'm gonna go rent a power auger tomorrow and see if that fixes the problem. So if I can fix it, I will. If not, I'll pass it off to the landlord.
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    Jul 13, 2009 11:26 AM GMT
    It's a long hard road to becoming a lesbian, padawan.
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Jul 13, 2009 12:33 PM GMT
    If it's an old house, I wouldn't mess with the drain plumbing. If it's galvanized, it could be rusted out and if you get too vigorous with the auger you could end up breaking the pipe apart and have a huge mess on your hands.
  • Menergy_1

    Posts: 737

    Jul 13, 2009 12:56 PM GMT
    Sedative saidIt's a long hard road to becoming a lesbian, padawan.




    Perfect! LMAO!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 13, 2009 12:58 PM GMT
    HotToddy said ....allow me to at least keep my testicles as a remembrance that I used to be a real man =(


    ****SIGH***** ok, here. {Hands them back.}
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Jul 13, 2009 12:59 PM GMT
    If you have a problem with the functioning of your toilet, I'd like to hear what you'd do if the problem was the pipe that runs under your yard (no matter if you hook into your own septic system or the cities' system).
    If you called for help there should we take away your "man" card?

    icon_eek.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 13, 2009 1:16 PM GMT
    Timberoo is right. You don't want to f* with galv. pipes. A lot of older homes used them as drains. You don't really wanna f* with terra cotta drains either which was widely used from the house to the septic system and even exist in some places connecting to the public sewer system.
    If you break a pipe under the footer of the house or out in the yard, guess what? PLUMBER TIME!!!
    Unless you have prior experiences 'handling' black water (turds) LEAVE IT TO THE EXPERTS! I'd hate to see you overcome with sewer gas or get sepsis.
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    Jul 13, 2009 1:19 PM GMT
    .....PLUS! In some areas....the HOMEOWNER can do modest repairs without getting a permit. BUT very few areas I know of allow a RENTER to do the work, unlicensed.
    Just FYI.
  • Menergy_1

    Posts: 737

    Jul 13, 2009 1:22 PM GMT
    HndsmKansan saidIf you have a problem with the functioning of your toilet, I'd like to hear what you'd do if the problem was the pipe that runs under your yard (no matter if you hook into your own septic system or the cities' system).
    If you called for help there should we take away your "man" card?

    icon_eek.gif


    I hope not! Well, at least, not in my case: when the toilets in my house backed up (and also brown sludgy stuff was coming up in the bathtubs!), I had no clue where the septic tank was nor where the cleanout pipes might be. I'd searched ahead of time just as a precaution, 'cause I'd bought this house newish, but the previous owner had no plans or information about where the builders had actually put the septic tank (not even a general location on the property) and I'd not been able to find any protruding cleanout pipes above ground in my searches around the almost 3 acres....) A sketched in tank location on a rolled up plan in the subdivision's Association records showed one possible location, but not proof positive.

    So, I called in the plumbers - they had to use a roto-rooter on the roof down through a toilet vent in one bathroom, told me to listen for the cable churning sounds in the house and which direction out of the house they were going. I sort of located the sounds, followed them out of the house, across a front courtyard, under a courtyard wall, and out to the area next to my entry walkway -- still no cleanout pipes, but at least the plumbers now had an idea (sort of) of where to dig and explore for the pipe to the septic tank! Digging down 4 feet or so (and removing landscaping in the way) they came to the PVC pipe, had to cut into it and install cleanouts, and in enlarging the hole to work in to do this, they hit up against the side of the septic tank -- on the oppostie side of the entryway from what the sketch had shown, of course!
    "Only" cost me $600... and there never was any indication of original cleanouts -- probably buried under the patio bricks by stupid workcrews...

    No, I don't think I should have my man-card revoked --Plungers and short auger cables hadn't worked for me. I sure had never dealt with something like this before, even back in my old San Francisco two-story Victorian -- and it needed two professional plumber guys to actually locate and fix the stoppage (minor as it turned out to be, it was still a gross mess indoors on brick floors in my new house a couple of years ago and right before Thanksgiving holiday! ) icon_eek.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 13, 2009 2:12 PM GMT
    Don't worry guys.... it's PVC piping and it's not in the main line under my yard. It's somewhere in the pipe that connects my dishwasher, kitchen sink, and bathtub all to the main line. Since it's filling up my bathtub and that's the last connection point, it has to be somewhere between the bathtub cut up and the main line, as my bathroom sink and toilet are draining fine. I reached the blockage with my plumber's snake, but alas, was unsuccessful at breaking up the blockage. So, I go to get a heavy duty one from the hardware store today =D

    I think the root of the problem stems from the fact that the dishwasher is connected to this line, and it's very definitely the longest one in the house. It's basically a rectangle and the main line is literally clear across the house... so all the dishwasher gunk has to travel a long horizontal pipe.... leading to: you guessed it. Anywho, if this auger doesn't work (I have every confidence that it should), and probably even if it does, I'll be letting my landlord know about the problem and requesting a pipe cleaning, because when I was trying to get at it last night with my own auger, I pulled back a fair amount of nastiness.
  • vindog

    Posts: 1440

    Jul 13, 2009 3:35 PM GMT
    I have an old house with a big willow tree in the front yard and am adding root kill to my clean-out every 3-4 months otherwise it will do what you describe. It's happened a few times.

    It sounds like to me you have an issue with the drainage leaving your house. Bathtubs are the first thing to fill as they are the lowest drain in the house, meaning your clog is coming from BELOW your bathtub. Probably a clog in your line heading to street.

    I am doubting your issue is the dishwasher. Call a plumber and get snaked.
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    Jul 13, 2009 3:59 PM GMT

    A couple of years ago, I had a bird fall into the vent system (for some reason, building code doesn't allow cap & screens) and get lodged all the way inside the septic tank, in the odd T-fitting that the code requires for no obvious reason. Couldn't be snaked, I had to open the septic tank and make a tool to fish it out. Hmm... plumbers write the codes. Job security?

    On the other hand, my parents house was built without any regard for codes or the law of gravity. There are a couple of beautiful big ponderosa trees in the yard that have grown from sticks into giants since I was a kid. It turns out they've worked their roots into all of the gaps in the cast-iron drain pipes. The solution is to re-plumb the whole thing, but for now it's dig and chop every time the drains back up, because you can't auger those rootballs.
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    Jul 13, 2009 4:03 PM GMT
    HotToddy saidThere is 6"+ of shitty water in my bathtub.


    This could end up being a health risk for you. You now have all sorts of gnarley bacteria in your tub. If you fool around with the plumbing and do the wrong thing, you might end up with a much bigger problem.

    It's time to man up....but that doesn't mean fixing it yourself. Admit that you can't and shouldn't attempt this, and call a plumber...

    Good luck with this. I had problems with the original main line to the street (it was terra cotta). Turns out that all my back ups were related to that being crushed (house was built in 1917) and all the sewage was going directly into the ground, or backing up into the house.

    I had to replace the entire line to the sewer main in the middle of the street. And, in Oakland CA the homeowner is responsible for replacing all of that and the digging up of the street.

    Hope that's not your issue.
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    Jul 13, 2009 4:58 PM GMT
    I questioned your manliness, but only till I looked at your profileicon_wink.gif Seriously, call a plumber. You have better things to do. That's what I tell my partner everytime the plubming breaks in or hous.
  • BeingThePhoen...

    Posts: 1157

    Jul 13, 2009 6:20 PM GMT
    Dude, get the power auger. You wouldn't want to disappoint you know who.....
    Tool Man