Out of shape---Want to train for a triathlon.....

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 22, 2009 7:16 PM GMT
    Hey guys, I am falling out of shape horribly. And for a long time, I have wanted to train for a triathlon and race in one and hopefully make it a hobby, both fitness and fun hobby.

    What is the best way to start? I figure training for this would help me drop some weight, build some lean muscle, and get my ass in some serious shape.

    Where do I start without breaking the bank?

    Advice please!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 22, 2009 8:06 PM GMT
    http://www.realjock.com/article/568/
  • DCEric

    Posts: 3713

    Jul 23, 2009 12:52 AM GMT
    Thread over in the first post.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 23, 2009 12:55 PM GMT
    Hey there!

    Can I be the first to say that you don't need to be some sort of super-fit monster to do a triahtlon. When I first started out, I didn't come from a swimming, riding or running background - I came from Piano... lol. First bit of sport I EVER did was a triathlon, and all the training I had was one run a week, one ride a week and 2 swims (worst leg for me icon_razz.gif).

    So you don't need too much time / money to become good at triathlon... The most important thing is to try and find people who you like and who enjoy training - nothing makes training more enjoyable than doing it with people you like icon_biggrin.gif

    Does that help...?
  • zakariahzol

    Posts: 2241

    Jul 23, 2009 2:23 PM GMT
    I dont know how out of shape you are. But why dont you take thing one step at a time. Triathlon is a high demand energy draining event. I myself is out of shape, and now working on being a good marathon runner.

    I have to build myself from basic. Do a 5 k first, 10k and hopefully this November a 21k (that my goal). I do some swimming in the night , just so I dont got burn out with just doing running all the times.

    I hope to do triathlon , one day ...but certainly not in the near future. Probably in one or two years. There nothing more demotivating than giving yourself unrealistic goal . Take it easy, fitness is a lifetimes commitment

    Anywhere congratulation and good luck on your quest for fitness. You and I are in the same boat.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 23, 2009 3:19 PM GMT
    Triathlon is not a big scary monster. The choice to make is Sprint vs. Olympic length for your first race. My suggestion is to do a sprint, as the swim is very short (this is the most daunting part, as the swims are almost always in open water) with a probably 20mi bike a 3 mile run.

    Last summer I spend about 5 weeks with 2-4 swims a week and as many runs. A couple times a week I'd head up to a gym and get on a stationary bike.

    There was actually a dude that was easily 300+ pounds, probably 40% bf or something, and was cruising right along.

    All you need to do is get your body used to doing a specific aerobic exercise for as long, plus a little extra, as you expect part of the event to take you to complete.

    Training has to be different for everyone because, as if you read any Tri info from other athletes who do it, everyone has different strengths with different parts of the race.

    For me, because I have a background in cross-country, I was able to run a little less (b/c I know how to run) and focus a little more on swimming, which is a better aerobic workout and easier on your joints if, like me, you're overweight as well as out of shape.

    So, I went from couch potato in the end of June to Triathlete in the second weekend of August. The biggest thing you need to do is spend time in each event at least twice a week, and by the time the race (and, really, do a Sprint your first time) arrives, be able to comfortably do each leg for the length of time you expect it to take you, plus a decent buffer (as you will undoubtedly race harder than you train).

    Good luck!
  • Run4Life83

    Posts: 207

    Jul 23, 2009 4:19 PM GMT
    Depending on when you schedule your triathlon I believe you can definately get in shape for it. I'm a marathoner and don't do triathlons (as I sink when I get in the water :-) ) but I have a lot of friends that do. Speaking with them they emphasize the importance of a few B.R.ick (Bike Run ick) workouts, just getting your body accustomed to going from one activity into another. The other thing building on the previous poster is to start small, make your first triathlon a Sprint (usually 500 swim, 11-20mile bike, 5K) instead of a half-Ironman, this way you can see if you enjoy the multisport idea. Another suggestion they had was to volunteer at longer triathlons just to see meet other people in the sport and even do a few longer distances on a relay team.

    Good luck!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 23, 2009 5:17 PM GMT
    upbi85 saidThere was actually a dude that was easily 300+ pounds, probably 40% bf or something, and was cruising right along.

    Bullshit.

  • Atriathlete

    Posts: 70

    Jul 24, 2009 7:40 PM GMT
    rnractintech said, "Depending on when you schedule your triathlon I believe you can definately get in shape for it. I'm a marathoner and don't do triathlons (as I sink when I get in the water :-) ) "

    For those of you who are low body fat, you are bound to be sinkers. The body essentially has three tissues: Bone (sinks), muscle (more or less buoyancy neutral), and fat (floats). In addition, you have air in your lungs (which helps you float).

    If you are low body fat, body position in the water is especially critical. You need to maintain a connection between the three body masses in the water: 1) head, 2) torso, and 3) legs.

    To maintain connection between the head and the torso, you need to lengthen the neck (think about standing tall in the water). Other people think about taking the wrinkles out of the back of the neck. Some people talk about the feeling of a string attached to the top of the head.

    To create the connection between torso and legs, you need to keep light tension in the lower abs.

    Now, what do you do with this information? Float on you stomach in the water letting your back curve naturally and let your arms and legs sink downward (the air in your lungs will keep your back on the surface). Then do the following sequence (that means one thing at a time):

    1) lengthen your neck as described above.
    2) put the tension in your lower abs and take the curve out of your back. Think about your back being flat on the surface of the water.
    3) raise your hands to the surface of the water like you're superman flying over the surface of the water.
    4) now bring your hands together into a nice "V" in front of your head (good hydrodynamic position, like you're an olympic diver entering the water)(and yes, I know you all have looked at olympic divers.).
    5) now, start a very light kick.

    Voila, you are on the surface of the water and not sinking.