Baby Birds

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 26, 2009 12:36 AM GMT
    There is a birds nest outside my front door that I recently saw that there are baby birds in it. Tonight when I got home from work I noticed that one had fallen out and seemed to still be alive. It is barely moving.

    Should I do anything? If so should I be weary about any type of diseases? I don't even know how I would take care of it.
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Jul 26, 2009 12:43 AM GMT
    Generally its curtins when a baby bird falls out of a nest. You can try putting the bird back in the nest, but wear gloves. It isn't because of any disease potential, but because the parents might reject the baby if you touch it. They may do so anyway.

    How old is the bird? Key question. If its a newborn, it may already be too late. If it were me, I'd put the bird back in the nest. Forget any nursing issues.

    The only time I had success with that was at home with a squirrel that already had its eyes open. He was fine.. except he followed me around the yard all the time. It went on for some time, then finally adapted back to the wild. That was my only success.

    On a side note. I have a bluebird pair nesting in a goard my Dad gave to me thats hanging on my iron fence at the back of my lawn. I thought it was awesome to see Bluebirds in my yard. My blue spruce in the front yard has been a favorite hatching place for some finches and a robin.
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    Jul 26, 2009 1:09 AM GMT
    usually but not all ways the reason a bird has come out of it's nest is the mother has pushed it out.

    you can put it back, but, if it finds it's self back on your door step, you can eitehr try and raise it your self or let it be picked off by the neighbourhood cats, more likely thing is though you'll find it's carcass and you'll have to throw it away.
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    Jul 26, 2009 1:21 AM GMT
    Thanks for the advice.

    I managed to get it back in the nest so I'll have to see what happens. It was still alive and active. I noticed the baby birds about a week ago so they are still very young. I guess it is a good thing that I live on the third floor of my apartment complex so nothing could get to it as easily.
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    Jul 26, 2009 1:43 AM GMT
    Birds would always nest in my mom's hanging baskets. One day I went outside when it was raining to get something out of the car, and I took an umbrella naturally. Well, it is a big umbrella and I thought I was out of the clear when I let it open, but it FREAKED the birds the HECK out!!!!! The mother got the hell out of dodge and the babies fell out of the nest. I remember one of them trying to claw on the brick to get back to the nest but failed.

    However, my dad went outside with a clean sock on his hand and put both birds back in the nest. They flew away the next morning! icon_biggrin.gif
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    Jul 26, 2009 1:49 AM GMT
    BetterThanOne saidThanks for the advice.

    I managed to get it back in the nest so I'll have to see what happens. It was still alive and active. I noticed the baby birds about a week ago so they are still very young. I guess it is a good thing that I live on the third floor of my apartment complex so nothing could get to it as easily.

    The parent(s) may have pushed it out, or its siblings. Or just a strong wind gust might have swung the nest if it's on a branch, catapulting the chick out. You did the right thing, and either the parent(s) will resume feeding it, or not.

    A curious aside: certain species of the cuckoo are called parasitic brooders. They lay an egg among the eggs of another unrelated bird. That egg usually hatches before the others, and the chick is fed by the other parent. In a short time, the cuckoo chick begins to eject any unhatched eggs from the nest, and also any other non-cuckoo hatched chicks.

    There are only 3 such cuckoo species in the US, so the chances of that in this case are low. But if you see the number of chicks declining in the nest until there is only 1, and it doesn't resemble the parents, then it may be a parasitic brooder cuckoo.
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    Jul 26, 2009 4:27 AM GMT
    You definitely did the right thing. Although contrary to popular belief, gloves are not necessary for handling baby birds. Parents will not push a baby bird back because it smells like a person, because most birds have a poor or no sense of smell! Some vultures have a great sense of smell, but most do not.

    If the parent/sibling does push it back out, you can find a care center nearby to take care of it, or just let nature take its course. Honestly, letting it go is probably the best option. I have rehabilitated many birds for educational purposes, and most of the time there is something physically/mentally wrong with the bird, usually not noticeable by most people. For example, one of my rehabilitated owls was deaf in one ear, but I did not know until it was much older! The parents pushed it out of the nest twice before we took it at the care center.

    And birds DO carry diseases and parasites (especially the swallow that I'm guessing is outside your door), but nothing that is going to do much harm. Hippoboscidae Ornithomyia (hippobosid flies) are very common, but are more annoying than anything (they can get in your eyes). But you may also get mites, and other small biting insects that can sometimes be very bad. I've had to get "immunized" from handling a diseased bird with a heavy ectoparasite load.

    And just one last thing that is really important (to me, ha), the three American cuckoos (genus Coccyzus) do not typically parasitize nests. Some S. American species do, along with many old-world species. A very common brood parasite in the US is the brown-headed cowbird. They probably account for more acts of parasitism than any other US species.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 26, 2009 4:11 PM GMT
    Don't you love it when people know their shit?
  • Sparkycat

    Posts: 1064

    Jul 26, 2009 7:26 PM GMT
    I cut down some shrubs in my yard, and left them in a big pile for a lawn service to haul away. Once they were gone I found that a rabbit had made a nest under them, and there were tiny baby bunnies in it. So, I cut down some tree branches, and constructed a shelter over them as a sun shield, left some water and food nearby. Momma rabbit continued to care for them until they left the nest. They then proceeded to eat my marigolds. But, I feel good about helping them. They would have baked exposed to the sun.
  • LifeByTheHorn

    Posts: 255

    Jul 26, 2009 8:31 PM GMT
    thindy24 saidYou definitely did the right thing. Although contrary to popular belief, gloves are not necessary for handling baby birds. Parents will not push a baby bird back because it smells like a person, because most birds have a poor or no sense of smell! Some vultures have a great sense of smell, but most do not.

    If the parent/sibling does push it back out, you can find a care center nearby to take care of it, or just let nature take its course. Honestly, letting it go is probably the best option. I have rehabilitated many birds for educational purposes, and most of the time there is something physically/mentally wrong with the bird, usually not noticeable by most people. For example, one of my rehabilitated owls was deaf in one ear, but I did not know until it was much older! The parents pushed it out of the nest twice before we took it at the care center.

    And birds DO carry diseases and parasites (especially the swallow that I'm guessing is outside your door), but nothing that is going to do much harm. Hippoboscidae Ornithomyia (hippobosid flies) are very common, but are more annoying than anything (they can get in your eyes). But you may also get mites, and other small biting insects that can sometimes be very bad. I've had to get "immunized" from handling a diseased bird with a heavy ectoparasite load.

    And just one last thing that is really important (to me, ha), the three American cuckoos (genus Coccyzus) do not typically parasitize nests. Some S. American species do, along with many old-world species. A very common brood parasite in the US is the brown-headed cowbird. They probably account for more acts of parasitism than any other US species.



    I agree with all of what you've said, because of my ornithological studies in the past. You do not need gloves for the scent of a human, but for some cross contamination of microbial infection. Most birds, especially song birds do not have sharp smell, like mammals.

    But if you find a mammal baby, yes, then you need a GLOVE. Some mammals do find human scent repulsive. icon_lol.gif

    I have carried so many baby birds to Wild Life Rescue Center in the past. The baby birds were throwing themselves from the air left & right, when they felt my presence in the near vicinity. This happened to me very frequently . I put them back, they fall down again. Their parents make the nests on little, short, flimsy palm trees. Palm trees sway, then it's raining baby birds. Hallelujah

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    Jul 27, 2009 1:50 AM GMT
    Well the bird is dead. I found it on the first floor sidewalk this morning a little bit away from my building. It was obviously not only kicked out but somehow carried/dragged away from the nest as I live on the third floor. There was no saving it.

    When I told my dad about the nest a while ago he did tell me about the cow bird and said that it is recommended to kill them. This is the second batch of babies that have been in that nest this year.

    Sparkycat I liked your story about the rabbits.
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    Jul 27, 2009 1:52 AM GMT
    Is there anything a person can get that will detract birds from nesting?