Bumble Bees--Not really a gay topic

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    Jul 26, 2009 3:15 PM GMT
    I have a bumble bee nest in my yard about 10 feet from my house. While I am for the most part a live and let live kinda guy, this is a bit too close for comfort. There is a very good chance I'm allergic to bee stings (Dr. told me I don't really want to find out) and the nest is in a spot that I can't just leave and mow around. Internet searches have not been helpful so I thought I'd ask those with much more wisdom (Caslon--ahem)...how do I get rid of them? So I'm bad, but I've already killed 10 of them, and there are still more. I tried lighting it on fire and drowning them, but they are still coming around. Is there some scent or something about scorched earth that is attracting them still? I need these guys out of my yard. Any recommedations are appreciated.
  • HndsmKansan

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    Jul 26, 2009 3:20 PM GMT
    Well let me say I've always liked Bumble bees. There are so many different types... Big, dark ones with yellow stripes, smaller ones that are brown... very interesting in the flower garden. I also like to watch them at close range, gathering nectar.

    Then I got a nest in the ground in my paddock at home next to the side of the barn. I was pissed to say the least. Sometimes they'd come out and buzz me when I was brushing KoKo (they didn't seem to bother him). They can get nasty if you mow in the vicinity or make any loud noises... BE CAREFUL!!!! I got partially stung by one and it was war..... I dumped horse manure on top of their hole, dirt a foot high, sprayed with insecticide... they finally went away. Let me say, KoKo (my registered quarter horse) didn't appreciate it at the time).

    My point is... you have a couple of choices.. leave them alone and hope.. 2) Call someone and have them exterminated 3) Take the initiative and spray. By the way.. what kind of nest is it? In the ground? Dump dirt on top of it. Like a whole wheelbarrow!!!!
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    Jul 26, 2009 3:24 PM GMT



    Here: they're endangered, so try these people who may have a program to relocate the hive.


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    Jul 26, 2009 3:35 PM GMT
    Consult a professional exterminator for feasibility & cost of killing or moving them. There are also some store sprays that send a long stream to hit nests up high, if that's where yours is, though I think most are for hornets & wasps, not sure about bees. Given your personal risk, you might ask a friend to do it, rather than you take the chance.

    I would act now. This could also be a problem for any visitors to your property. Plus the nest may grow and colonize.

    And while 1 bee sting may not disable you, they are known to swarm and deliver multiple stings, especially if you start messing with their nest. I've seen that happen to soldiers during field training, and we had to evacuate these big strong guys for a couple days of hospital treatment, totally disabled.
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    Jul 26, 2009 3:48 PM GMT
    Thanks. These are nesting in the ground and I have used the spray from a distance (that's how I got the first 10). I would have thought that lighter fluid and fire would have driven them off, but they were back the next day. I will try a mound of dirt on top of it and see if that works. Thanks Chris.
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    Jul 26, 2009 4:12 PM GMT
    Bumblebees aren't aggressive. They will ignore humans as long as you don't do anything to their nests or don't accidentally squish them or something. And they'll disappear come cold season, anyway. So why'd you wanna kill them. icon_confused.gif It's almost fall!
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    Jul 26, 2009 4:21 PM GMT
    I'd rather not kill them, I just don't want them where they are--where they might sting me while mowing the lawn or something. And I still have at least two months to go before the frost.
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    Jul 26, 2009 4:31 PM GMT
    Well... we have a pretty big front lawn (more like a jungle). And I grew up to a lot of bumblebees. Mostly solitary carpenter ones, but some of the larger colonial ones too. And they never sting, pretty easy to avoid accidentally hitting them too, being quite big. Not to mention, they're quite few in number. If you know where their nest is I suggest just staking it off or something. They just get bad publicity because wasps and smaller bees are pretty unconscientious stingers. LOL

    But if you're really worried I'll probably go with the professional exterminator thing. They got biowarfare. icon_razz.gif

    Also, bumblebees are diurnal. If you're doing it in daylight, you're missing a lot of those who are outside buzzing around. Not to mention that those WILL try and defend their nest. Higher chance of getting stung.

    I don't think covering up the entrance hole will really help either, remember, they dug that hole in the first place. icon_razz.gif They can dig themselves back out quite easily.
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    Jul 26, 2009 5:42 PM GMT
    for a Home Remedy:
    Five gallons of gasoline down the main hole AFTER dark. Dark. Not 'dusk'!

    DO NOT SET IT AFIRE unless you really want to see what cummulus clouds look like up close..icon_exclaim.gif
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    Jul 26, 2009 5:52 PM GMT
    Nimbus!
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    Jul 26, 2009 6:46 PM GMT
    Are you really sure they are bumblebees and not some other species? Bumblebees generally are not aggressive and are major pollinators where the common honeybee has sufffered from diseases and become rare. Anyhow, it doesn't really matter what kind of bees they are if they are a health problem for you. I would get recommendations for a good exterminator and talk to him about possibliities.
    Galsoline on a nest I believe is not recommended. Aside from fire danfer, you could be severely polluting your own yard.
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    Jul 27, 2009 1:27 AM GMT
    post-3-1115424813jpg-1.jpg
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    Jul 27, 2009 1:30 AM GMT
    Don't touch them, if they are happily surviving there leave them, the humble bumble is an awesome bee, needed by nature and slowly being wiped out.

    If you are that horrified by nature then call up a bee keeper, they will come take them away.

    Hell I'd love bumbles to move in here, I'm allergic to the damned things.. they are harmless as long as you don't do treading on there hive!
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    Jul 27, 2009 2:09 AM GMT
    See this is the problem~
    Their hive (or nest or colony or compound) is in out in my yard about 10 feet from the house. It's along the path between my house and my veggie garden and I beg to differ that these are not aggressive. More than once I've had to abandon mowing with my arms flailing, screaming like a girl, running away because the damn thing wouldn't get out of my way. I much prefer Vespa's method. I'd do that to a single bee if I could (or wasp for that matter). I know they pollinate stuff and all, but get out of my yard. I was here first, dammit icon_evil.gif
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    Jul 27, 2009 2:17 AM GMT
    Before you help decimate an animal population that is on the decline

    http://www.xerces.org/bumblebees/

    check that out

    and call a bee keeper to move them, not kill them!
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    Jul 27, 2009 2:33 AM GMT
    start smoking. They┬┤ll move out.

    Perhaps icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Jul 27, 2009 2:33 AM GMT
    I'm a beekeeper and the best thing to do is call a licensed pest control company in your area. Unlike honeybees, it is not possible to move bumbles, as has been suggested here, they live in small colonies but are "independent operators" so to speak and will not follow the rest of the colony. They are beneficial pollinators and are not aggressive, but a thorough eradication from an inconvenient location requires someone with a time-released insecticide so that they are exterminated as the pupae hatch out over a period of weeks (which is why you do-it-yourself measures haven't "worked"--they have, actually probably killed the live ones, but you are now seeing the new generation.
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    Jul 27, 2009 2:50 AM GMT
    I'm incredibly fearful of insects, so I hate them with a furious fury!


    RAAAWR! icon_twisted.gif



    I don't know why but I can't stand insects, I'd exterminate the hell out of them... icon_neutral.gif

    EDIT: Not that you should exterminate them, just that's what I would do.
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    Jul 27, 2009 3:17 AM GMT
    Are you sure they're bumblebees and not wasps? The later are greatly more aggressive than your typical "bumblebee" or domesticated honeybee. Although pollinators are becoming scarce, I would remove a wasp nest. "Bumblebee" colonies don't get very large and are not a threat unless you physically harm the colony's structure.
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    Jul 27, 2009 3:22 AM GMT
    here is a picture taken from my porch. The dead spot with the twigs is where they are nesting. Granted it was relatively green, until we torched it. They are not wasps.

    IMGP0917a.jpg
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    Jul 27, 2009 3:59 AM GMT
    mFit,
    If they are bees, leave them bee! As was said before, bees are VERY benficial creatures! icon_biggrin.gif If that is out of the question, put a clear glass bowl over the hole with a brick or something to weigh it down - you want to form a seal between the ground and the bowl so they can not crawl under it. Leave the bowl there for a week or so. The bees that are out gathering nectar will find a new place to live because they will not be able to return to the hive and the ones still underground will fly out of the hole, because they see light, but they will eventually starve and die. This is the way to eliminate a nest without insecticides, chemicals or potentially starting a fire!

    The trick is getting inside the bees tiny little brains. Bees of this type are not 'programmed' to dig a new hole (e.g. the glass bowl does not compute). They see light and they think all is well even though it is not! Try it and let me know how it goes.

    icon_exclaim.gifBe nice to bees or at least, be smarter than themicon_exclaim.gif
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    Jul 27, 2009 4:08 AM GMT
    Yes Let it Bee! icon_lol.gif



    It that doesn't work you must become queen of the hive! icon_lol.gif
  • HndsmKansan

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    Jul 27, 2009 4:11 AM GMT
    Well did you dump the dirt?

    These sound like the ones I battled in the paddock......
  • HndsmKansan

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    Jul 27, 2009 4:14 AM GMT
    Navy96 saidmFit,
    If they are bees, leave them bee! As was said before, bees are VERY benficial creatures!



    I agree, they are and I like them, but not when they are after me for mowing or just moving around.... I'd want them gone.
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    Jul 27, 2009 4:24 AM GMT
    StudlyScrewRite saidfor a Home Remedy:
    Five gallons of gasoline down the main hole AFTER dark. Dark. Not 'dusk'!

    DO NOT SET IT AFIRE unless you really want to see what cummulus clouds look like up close..icon_exclaim.gif


    Imaging this....."MUSHROOM CLOUDS" with flaming bees flying away...literally "fire flies".... I know this because my oldest son did it in my back yard when he was 16! It was a fucking riot until it started to burn the lower leaves in the oak and maple trees.... I found out that he first shoved 2 M-100's into the holes in the ground and blasted them first and then dumped the gas and fire bombed them...Left a crater in the back yard about a foot and a half deep......but the bees are gone and none have ever tried to nest again in the yard 8 years later.... I don't recommend this approach if you are not looking to injure the bees, nor upset your neighbors with the explosions and the fireball...... But it was VERY entertaining! Scared the FUCK out of the neighbors and did break a window in the shed.