Keeping Personal Appointments Private on a Work Calendar

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 27, 2009 9:51 PM GMT
    Because my job requires many night time events, how can I keep one calendar on Outlook yet retain my privacy when it comes to personal appointments? My secretary will see "private appointment" when I enter it but then I don't want the I.T. Dept. to be able to log in to my account and see the details of those personal events. I may need to jot a phone number or address in the notes of that appointment and wouldn't want that seen.

    My current plan is to sync a PDA with Outlook and then code the events, but coding is a hassle. And then the notes / phone numbers / addresses would not be coded.

    Any ideas to help me out?

    Steven
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 28, 2009 12:47 AM GMT
    If you don't want the IT department at your work to see your personal events, DON'T put them on your work computer. Your IT department (if they are doing their jobs right) can see anything and everything on your computer. Passwords don't mean a thing either. If they want to get into your files, they'll just put a key logger on your machine, get your password and then log into what they want.
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Jul 28, 2009 12:50 AM GMT
    Keep your work information separate from personal. For me it isn't as much of a problem, but if I worked for a large firm, I'd never mix the two.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 28, 2009 12:51 AM GMT
    Use google calender for personal stuff.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 28, 2009 1:02 AM GMT
    I believe court cases have affirmed the concept that office computers belong to the company, and that anything you put on them also belongs to the company. It's the same principle that says you cannot prevent your office desk from being searched by the company.

    Your personal briefcase and PDA are another matter, and generally fall under the same "reasonable search" protections that all citizens enjoy under the US Constitution.

    You may be able to get around this if your PDA allows you to run multiple accounts on it (my Palm does), and assuming your PDA is your personal property, and not company-owned.

    You set up an additional acount on your PDA, with a matching one on your home computer. When you sync your PDA with your office Outlook, you only sync your "business name" so that your other personal account data does not transfer to your office Outlook.

    On your home computer, you sync your PDA twice with Outlook (which I assume you also have at home): once for your office name, and once for your personal name. You enter personal data onto your home computer and sync it with your PDA, but only under your personal name account.

    Obviously not as elegant as having it all on your office Outlook, but your Outlook is open to view by the company. In the office, you will have to rely solely on your PDA for your personal items, entering and viewing them there when away from home.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 28, 2009 4:05 AM GMT
    I'm an IT administrator and will affirm what halltd said. IT personnel can see anything on your computer. They don't need a keylogger though. They can log in as administrator and view anything on your workstation. If you want to try to outwit the IT guys, that's a battle you'll lose icon_twisted.gif (insert evil laugh here).

    That said, are they likely to see it? No. If they do see it, are they likely to care? No.

    I come across stuff on people's work computers that shouldn't be there, or might be a little personally embarrassing, but it's part of an IT code of ethics to pretend you don't see those things (unless there's something blatantly illegal or puts the company in danger of lawsuits).

    If you really don't want it seen by anyone at work, use a Yahoo or Google account.

    We don't prohibit people from putting personal stuff on their work computers, but I always recommend it nonetheless. There have been situations where people put personal photos, contacts, personal email, etc. on their work computer and then were fired or laid off. Guess what... you can kiss that stuff goodbye.

    That's why it's good practice to keep your personal stuff on your personal computer and keep the business stuff on the company's computer.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 28, 2009 6:16 AM GMT
    The responses here make too much sense to ignore. Thanks for the reasoned advice.

    Steven