Knee problem--has anyone worked around it?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 12, 2009 12:12 AM GMT
    A couple weeks ago, after a pretty hard run (along the cement paths around my house), I had a horrible pain in my knee--a pain which didn't go away for a few days and which I went to the doctor for almost immediately. There was no damage--but my knee was inflamed and my doctor recommended I get another hobby than running.

    Since then, I've been doing a bit of biking (at least at the gym; don't have a bike yet) but I'm wondering if any of you have had a knee issue and was able to start running again? I took my dog for a walk today and he wanted to run a bit, so I started jogging, but I could feel the pain rising, so I resumed walking so as to prevent anything.

    Any exercises I could do to build up the muscles around the knee to help support it?

    I'm just pretty disappointed about it, because I was starting to enjoy running (ran my first 5k in April) after loathing it for so long.
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    Aug 15, 2009 8:37 AM GMT
    Just a couple of questions:

    1. What sort of doctor was this? Was he one that works with athletic injuries?

    2. Were there any x-rays or any other type of imaging done?

    It sounds kind of strange that the doctor would tell you to just give up on running with only one exam. I would recommend that you go see a doc that specializes in running or ortho, they might be able to give you better advice.

    Also, check out how to stretch your T-band, it can often cause knee pain.

    In the meantime, find some other type of cardio that doesn't hurt your knees - - biking, swimming.
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    Aug 15, 2009 10:47 AM GMT
    unl1988 said

    It sounds kind of strange that the doctor would tell you to just give up on running with only one exam. I would recommend that you go see a doc that specializes in running or ortho, they might be able to give you better advice.



    I agree. It's always best to get a second opinion.

    However, you might just find out that you are not built to be a runner. I have constant knee and hip inflammation problems that keep me from running. I used to get bummed out about it because I like going for a nice jog. So, instead, I started biking because it's a lot less stress on my knee and hip joints, and I like it just as much. It's also helped me build up enough strength and endurance in my legs for be to still go for a nice jog once in a while without my knee and hip flaring up.

  • Mikeylikesit

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    Aug 15, 2009 10:50 AM GMT
    Sounds like to me you have either some tendonitis going on or patellar inflammation of the fluid around the knee cap.

    I would think with some rest for a few weeks your knee would be fine. Tendons & ligaments heal very slowly.
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    Aug 15, 2009 11:47 AM GMT
    Go see a sports doctor or a physio and get a second opinion. GPs are great for general health stuff, but not so good for more specific sports stuff.
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    Aug 15, 2009 1:46 PM GMT
    It is not unusual for a primary care physician to proceed conservatively the first time you present with "certain" knee problems. This is the usual and accepted medical practice. MRI's and other diagnostic procedures can cost thousands of dollars; some imaging studies (not MRIs) may have radiation associated with them. If the problem happens again, your physician will refer you to a specialist who will start with imaging studies. Unless the physician was a runner himself, he would not understand why someone would want to continue running and risk another injury. That's why Docs, with the jock mentality, go into sports medicine or orthopedics. They will certainly understand you better. Prior history is very important. If you damaged the cartilage playing sports in HS, you may have chronic problems with the knee. The Terrible Triad of O' Donahue (injury to the ACL, MCL and medial meniscus) has ended the careers of many athletes. Besides the problems mentioned in the triad.. bursitis, arthritis, and other tendon and ligament problems may cause pain.
    To have a stable knee the quadriceps and hamstrings need to be strong.
    There are also stretching exercises such as those used for the iliotibial band.

    http://www.buzzle.com/articles/knee-strengthening-exercises.html
    http://www.aafp.org/afp/20050415/1545.html
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    Aug 15, 2009 2:03 PM GMT
    get a new doctor that is pro-exercise. doctors that aren;t proactive about ur lifestyl just means they're the wrong doctor for u. but if u do have tendonitis (where after a semi-rigorous physical activity ur joints are inflamed, could be all ur jeoints or could be just some or could be just one) try using lower impact machines other than running like the elliptical, a cross trainer, or even a bike. if u dont have tendonitis, try takng some joing supplements like chondroitin (spellcheck) or osteo-bi flex. it helps strenghtne ur joints, and if ur joints still hurt after take motrin. sometimes, u hae to be stubborn to get over a speed bump. but also, know ur limits. and really, see another doctor. a lot of doctors are not proactive due to a sedentary lifestyle they also have. so either go to a kinesiologist or a physical therapist rather than a general practice or orthopedic doctor.
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    Aug 15, 2009 2:14 PM GMT
    I have knee problems, in fact I had a partial tear in my MCL over memorial day ligament. trust me it is not fun. I have been to the ortho guy. most doctors are unlikely to get you an MRI unless they are planning to operate. XRAYS will tell you next to nothing about knee damage because there is so much soft tissue in the knee and xrays don't image soft tissue. The fact of the matter is that running is extremely hard on the human body and most people over the age of 18 are not built for it. I tore my MCL playing volleyball but I hadn't run in years because when I used to run I spent every night with ice bags on my knees because it hurt to walk. you don't want to risk tearing any of the ligaments in your knee. I was lucky in tearing my MCL because it will heal itself with time. had I torn my ACL or PCL it would have meant surgery.
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    Aug 17, 2009 11:17 AM GMT
    The only other thing I would add to the comments above, which are all good. When you get back to running, try to stay off cement. There are various studies but many believe asphalt has some give (it's a little soft) and cushions your run while concrete, is just that, concrete. I hate running on it because it makes my knees sore.

    Bill