Is it possible to gain weight from too much cardio?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 22, 2009 1:47 AM GMT
    So I wanna pose this question to anyone out there who has an opinion. I have always worked out just sort of to stay at a plateau. But I have been eating out alot more lately and as a result gained some weight. To counter this I began doing more time on the treadmill and light lifting only twice a week. But for some strange reason doing 3 miles 6 days a week is causing me to gain weight. I put on another 10lbs. I still eat out just as much but i figured eating healthier out and doing more cardio would help but it doesn't seem to.

    Is there anything anyone could recommend to cut this weight down?
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    Aug 22, 2009 2:03 AM GMT
    Muscle is more dense than fat. If you're doing more cardio, then your leg muscles are developing and making your overall body weight go up.

    You should stop weighing yourself. If your clothes fit fine (or if your clothes feel loose), then you shouldn't worry about what your weight.

    Another possibility is that you're taking in too much sodium. And all that weight gain is from water. Well, maybe not all 10 lbs. But I'm sure some of it is.
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    Aug 22, 2009 3:01 AM GMT
    xrichx is right. also consider this: how old are you? is your natural metabolism changing? how do you know it's "bad" weight that you're gaining? get a body composition test.
  • gymguy81

    Posts: 455

    Aug 22, 2009 6:07 AM GMT
    yeah i absolutly agree with jack get your BMI and body comp done id rather gain 5 lbs of muscle and lose 2 lbs of fat. your gaining in muscle can also increce your metabolic rate to lose fat in the long run but might not lose weight
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    Aug 22, 2009 8:13 AM GMT
    maybe i should get that done. I know my clothes don't fit right which has promted me to weig myself in the first place.

    But I think thats a good point. I just find it hard to believe anyone can gain 10lbs in one week no matter what it is especially in muscle.

    The only reason I think its bad weight i cuz i have a handful of flab when i grab my midsection which i never have before.
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    Aug 22, 2009 2:33 PM GMT
    Fat loss is through slower and longer cardio. On a treadmill, I do about 15 mins, and do a slight run, not a full jog. The setting is about a 5. This will enable you to lose fat, but retain muscle. Too much or too fast of a run will burn muscle and fat.
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    Aug 22, 2009 2:51 PM GMT
    10lb in a week? Water and poo.


    icon_eek.gif
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    Aug 22, 2009 2:54 PM GMT
    LuvMuscle99 saidFat loss is through slower and longer cardio. On a treadmill, I do about 15 mins, and do a slight run, not a full jog. The setting is about a 5. This will enable you to lose fat, but retain muscle. Too much or too fast of a run will burn muscle and fat.


    Actually HIIT is much more effective for fat loss.
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    Aug 22, 2009 2:57 PM GMT
    You said you are eating out more. How many more calories are you consuming?
    There are a few researchers that believe that exercise stimulates appetite and the person ends up losing little or no weight at all.
    This idea ended up as the lead article in the Time Magazine couple weeks ago. The article has seen been criticized by many fitness organizations and the American College of Sports Medicine.
    I was unable to lose weight no matter how long and hard I exercised. Once I cleaned up my diet, I lost 20 pounds doing the same intensity of exercise

    http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1914857,00.html

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    Aug 22, 2009 3:45 PM GMT
    Well I have been eating out the same amount now for a year. I only seemed to start gaining weight when I came to Denver 2 weeks ago. And I have been running more. I think the sodium might be part of it. I also wonder if I am running too hard, my resting heart rate is 125 so a brisk walk takes me up to my fat burning cardio level so when I do actually run like 6mph my heart rate is around 190. I'm not an expert but I think that's bad.
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    Aug 22, 2009 3:45 PM GMT
    VUandC88 saidSo I wanna pose this question to anyone out there who has an opinion. I have always worked out just sort of to stay at a plateau. But I have been eating out alot more lately and as a result gained some weight. To counter this I began doing more time on the treadmill and light lifting only twice a week. But for some strange reason doing 3 miles 6 days a week is causing me to gain weight. I put on another 10lbs. I still eat out just as much but i figured eating healthier out and doing more cardio would help but it doesn't seem to.

    Is there anything anyone could recommend to cut this weight down?


    LOL.

    Here's something that you can take to the bank:
    1. If you eat more calories than you expend, you'll gain weight.
    2. If you expend more calories than you eat, you'll lose weight.

    Next item.
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    Aug 22, 2009 4:58 PM GMT
    chuckystud said

    Here's something that you can take to the bank:
    1. If you eat more calories than you expend, you'll gain weight.
    2. If you expend more calories than you eat, you'll lose weight.


    Exactly.

    As an aside, I overheard one of those faux personal trainers at Golds Gym Oakland tell his trainee that the "key" to not gaining weight (fat) was to make sure NOT to eat just before bedtime. I guess the rationale is that since you won't be "using" those calories when you sleep, you'll put on fat.

    A calorie is a calorie. There are good reasons to eat frequent smaller meals during the day, but you can't get around Chucky's simple equation above. As long as the calories eaten before bedtime are not EXTRA (meaning, your caloric intake is the same and balance, say, in a 24 hour period by output), you won't gain fat.
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    Aug 22, 2009 5:03 PM GMT
    As a personal rule I usually don't eat after 10 and I go to bed around 2. I never eat more calories than I burn I keep track of that stuff.

    I tried doing a low intensity cardio workout today and Im gonna cut back on the salt so I guess we will see. The other thing is I usually have a high metabolism so salt should work out of my system quick, unless my metabolism is the problem.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Aug 22, 2009 5:24 PM GMT
    Yes, it's called A.E.D. It's when you workout too much and your heart rate never naturally comes down (i.e., you don't take 5 minutes to cool down). That leaves your heart in an excited state. Aside from being jittery, it means your body gets too good at burning glucose. These people essentially burn through their glucose, but their heart rates don't revert to fat burning stage and so instead of tapping into their fat storage, they go right to their muscle, leaving all that fat in play, which builds and builds. It's a very common reason for why you see personal trainers gain a lot of weight (not in a good way) even though they're working out.
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    Aug 22, 2009 5:32 PM GMT
    What does A.E.D. stand for in this context?

    I researched this and found Anti Epileptic Drugs, and Advanced Eating Disorders.

    In my experience, at high training loads, your heart rate comes DOWN. In fact, in my 20's, my resting heart rate was 43.

    No one trains 24 hours a day. For an advanced athlete, heart rate will come down within minutes of exercise.

    Most fat ass personal trainers I know eat like shit.

    Perhaps you can educate me?

    I've never met a highly trained athlete who did not have a reduction in heart rate with training.
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    Aug 22, 2009 5:40 PM GMT
    My speculation is that the young man here is probably genetically inclined to be heavier, and more muscular, but, is fighting his genetics. I suspect that his weight gain is from lower body muscle mass, which is a natural outcome of his exercise program. One has to ask, why would he want to be lighter, and more skins and bones that he now is? Instead of fighting it, he should likely ponder a more balanced program including resistance training with weights. Eventually, if he continues, he'll swing the other way, without proper resistance training and adequate calories.
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    Aug 22, 2009 6:55 PM GMT
    Hmm.. I get the feeling he doesn't want to be muscular. I think he wants to maintain his slim build. So the better suggestion would be for him to cut back on the calories.
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    Aug 22, 2009 8:17 PM GMT
    Oh I think everyone has good points here. I do come from a family of heavier people. But fortunately for me I lost weight in high school and never gained It back till now. Currently I am 200 lbs as of this morning. I might have natural muscle I don't know about. Accounting for the higher weight and slimed build. I would not be opposed to being larger just not my first thought.