What finally changed things for you? (Question for the inconsistent types)

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 22, 2009 4:39 PM GMT
    So, I've always had trouble being consistent. I have a highly distracted personality and every day is different than the next for me in a lot of ways. This makes life creative and fun, but is terrible for exercise.

    I made a lot of progress by joining an MMA gym and just going through routines with a class. I just had to show up and didn't have to plan a workout at all. However, I want to start doing more weight training along with a diet that will support it and my flakiness makes it tough.

    For you guys that struggled with discipline, what finally worked for you? Or, what was the big changing point?
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    Aug 22, 2009 10:23 PM GMT
    For me, it was martial arts. I regularly go four times a week for an hour-long class that combines cardio, kickboxing, pushups, situps, and form. That's pretty much all I do besides walking and calisthenics.
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    Aug 22, 2009 11:57 PM GMT
    Wanting to win in my sport, and knowing there were other guys out there who were dotting all the i's and crossing all the t's.
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    Aug 23, 2009 6:28 AM GMT
    For me, it was going to classes too that helped me get the consistency I wanted. In classes there's a social atmosphere that keeps you encouraged and motivated. You get to know the other regulars and if you're a no show you know they're going ask you where you were. You get variety in your workouts and, like the OP said, don't have to plan our a routine. The classes I usually go to (Body Pump and Spinning) are really fun and interactive so it makes working out less of a chore like it can be for some.
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    Aug 23, 2009 8:38 AM GMT
    I don't think I struggled with discpline per se; I think it was connected to being slightly aimless. My workouts had no real purpose or end goal. All that changed when I decided I wanted to loose body fat, which coincided with me taking up hockey. Once I had a firm aim and some specificity to my workouts, it's all been very easy to follow a programme and a diet.
  • jrs1

    Posts: 4388

    Aug 23, 2009 8:47 AM GMT
    I can't say that I've been too awful with consistency, but a series of unfortunate occurrences are sure to change the bearing on anyone. hardship or struggle, I feel, may not cause but has a strong correlation to producing innovation.
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    Aug 23, 2009 10:26 AM GMT
    Committing to personal training 3 times a week. I don't have trouble entertaining myself, or finding something to do. so I had trouble committing to gym. being a stocky guy, with a natural big build, chest shoulders, arm, and calves to dye for. I never had to go to gym to get these things.

    But middle age come along, and it was showing I really needed to do some maintenance, but I had trouble committing to the gym, as there was something ells I could be doing, even if it was just pulling weeds.

    So I commited to personal training 3 times a week and have been doing this for over 5 years now.
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    Aug 23, 2009 2:22 PM GMT

    I've been a bit of a casual/sometimes inconsistent gym goer for a couple of years, and then over the last 6mos have gotten more regular and more serious. What did it for me was a combination of three things..

    1. Getting a really clear idea/goal in my head about what I wanted to achieve. Before that I had vague ideas of wanting to "looking good" (and in my case, specificially, "look more masculine") but nothing more concrete then that. Once I got an idea in my head about exactly what sort of body I wanted, and by when(ish) then I started to get an idea of what I needed to do to get that, and so I'm more committed.

    2) The personal trainer thing, like the guy just before me suggested. I get a PT session 2x a week - if all else fails I get a really solid workout 2x a week. And if that's all I do in a particular week (it rarely is) then I go a whole body routine, if it's one of several sessions then I mix up the muscle group I train with the PT.. that way it maximises the benefit of whatever I do, helps me learn and keep things varied, and offers a 'minimum number of visits per week' fall back.

    3) Routine, routine, routine. I work and study hard, I'm busy. So I have a real routine, that starts Sunday night in preparation for the week ahead - I sort out all my clothes and food so I don't have to think about it over the week, and so that getting to the gym first thing in the morning is easy. And then I make sure I get 8hours sleep on the Sunday night so that I'm fresh for Monday morning - and all the preparation and rest kinda sets the tone for the rest of the week. Weeks when I don't do the prep, I am way less consistent.

    4) Hanging around here and other places/people that are inspiring/interesting/motivating.

    Hope there's something in there to help you buddy.


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    Aug 23, 2009 2:26 PM GMT
    Finding a healthy exercise that could double as a fun hobby. For me it was cycling
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    Aug 23, 2009 2:40 PM GMT
    Working with a trainer helps. If you have scheduled sessions that you've already paid for you're pretty certain to show up. The trainer will also correct your mistakes and show you new routines to address your specific body issues.
    You don't have to keep the trainer forever but it does help you get focused. The rest is up to you.
  • DuggerPDX

    Posts: 386

    Aug 23, 2009 5:44 PM GMT
    1. Trainer
    2. Keeping to a schedule
    3. eating breakfast, simple I know but something I had never done before going to the gym
    4. Seeing results
    5. Seeing more results!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 23, 2009 6:47 PM GMT
    There's danger in the other direction, too. I've seen top-level athletes who become too wedded to their routine, log, schedule, etc., and tip over into over-training, and/or become unglued when they can't follow the routine.

    One of our top skiers finally threw out his training log and simply went with what he felt he needed (that's a very educated 'feel" by the way, not the get up and see what you want to do kind) because he felt the routine and schedule were driving things, not his real needs.

    Flexibility is important, especially when it comes to recognizing the very real need to rest.
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    Aug 23, 2009 7:22 PM GMT
    Completing a candida cleanse (30 days) and sticking to a diet with no complex sugars. I became more focused, more organized, less irritable, less moody, and far more productive. Best thing I ever did for myself.
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    Aug 24, 2009 12:00 AM GMT
    Thanks for all the thoughts, guys.

    tahoejock, do you have any recommended reading when it comes to the diet without the sugars you're talking about? I've noticed that sugary foods can have a big affect on my focus.