So....my theory was right

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 23, 2009 5:16 AM GMT
    Book are going to be soon (by soon I mean decades and decades, hopefully centuries from now) going to be only an anachronism displayed in your local museum of fucking history. Here's why:

    http://www.cracked.com/blog/so-book-like-youd-think-it-was-a-book-but-its-not/


    I blame the damn public for being so lazy icon_mad.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 23, 2009 6:21 AM GMT
    thank gawd but give me something other then a kindle, something more open sourced!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 23, 2009 6:25 AM GMT
    So it is lazier to read a book on a machine than it is on paper?
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    Aug 23, 2009 7:28 AM GMT
    E-book or real book.. does it matter? You're still reading a book. That's what really counts.

    Also, e-books saves trees. And you don't have to haul around super heavy boxes of real books whenever you move to a new place. icon_lol.gif
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    Aug 23, 2009 10:51 AM GMT
    LMOA that link was a funny read
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    Aug 23, 2009 1:49 PM GMT
    With data storage densities becoming what they are, and bandwidth becoming faster every day, the days of recreational paper documents and daily newspapers are numbered. Technology changes. Now, we have not just a few pictures in print, as in a book, but movies, sounds, ... a completely different experience.

    Wikipedia is a fairly good example, as are any of the modern online newspapers, or a paid encyclopedia online.

    So MUCH information / entertainment is INSTANTLY available. No more Dewey Decimal. No more drives to the library. No more waiting on a book. It's click, click, and no trees died, and the books weren't hauled around.

    I think, at some point, everyone will have a heads up display (similar to military tech) and be on The Net all the time.

    As far as lazy goes, I don't know that it's lazier to read a story from a device, as opposed to a bound book, or paper back. I'm not seeing the lazy part.
  • fitartistsf

    Posts: 638

    Aug 23, 2009 5:41 PM GMT
    It's progress... before Guttenberg and his press, illuminated, hand-painted/inked manuscripts, read by just a few, learned men, was the norm. Even kings were sometimes illiterate, having their information read to them... the press opened up the ability of the masses to become more learned, articulate, and to be able to converse about anything... back then paper, well, vellum/parchment, was the medium utilized. Today, it's digital. If something like a Kindle can "teach", in a faster way than old manuscripts hauled on the backs of burros and transferred from town to town over centuries, great... again, that's progress.
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    Aug 23, 2009 8:31 PM GMT
    Funny link. but at least we now know your humor, Inmate ;)
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    Aug 23, 2009 8:37 PM GMT
    An ebook machine will be available much like the Kindle from Amazon but something much more affordable on which all our books will be accessible. That being said, unless it turns into an affordable tablet pc then ALL of academe will still buy books bc we cover ours in writings, notes, etc...

    I would enjoy the technology for the green effects.
  • DiverScience

    Posts: 1426

    Aug 23, 2009 9:36 PM GMT
    xrichx saidE-book or real book.. does it matter? You're still reading a book. That's what really counts.

    Also, e-books saves trees. And you don't have to haul around super heavy boxes of real books whenever you move to a new place. icon_lol.gif


    As long as they can steal it off my damned reader, then yeah it matters.

    Sides, kindles just don't smell right (yeah I smell my books, what of it?). I wish the Kindle DRM didn't fucking blow goats, or I'd own one, but I also like my library.
  • Delivis

    Posts: 2332

    Aug 23, 2009 9:41 PM GMT
    Nothing wrong with e-books. But nothing beats the feeling of a real book in my hands, curled up in bed, reading by candlelight.
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    Aug 23, 2009 9:47 PM GMT
    I'm all about books being smelly. Knowledge should be tangible, should have a feel. I like that books exists in libraries, in shelves, in specific places. Putting books entirely on computers loses some of the beauty, at least it does to me.
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    Aug 23, 2009 10:28 PM GMT
    Music was never as good as it was when you had a real, tangible CD jewel box, with the information booklet. You could flip thru the the booklet, with lyrics, and artwork, and the smell of fresh plastic. I believe you should be able to smell and touch your music, not just hear it. The move to full digital distribution destroyed the tactile, aural, olfactory and sensual experience of music forever. I blame the damn public for being so lazy.

    ...

    Music was never as good as it was when you had a true analog vinyl record, to capture the full "emotional timbre" that digital renders into just so many "chopped up packets of data." And the smell of fresh vinyl! Album covers were true works of art that were often suitable for framing. The move to CDs destroyed the tactile, aural, olfactory and sensual experience of music forever. I blame the damn public for being so lazy.

    ...

    Music was never as good as it was when you had to crank the Victrola to play your Edison tin cylinders. Flat vinyl on motorized turntables forever changed the tactile connection with the music to a cold, automated, background process. Music was no longer special. The move to vinyl disks destroyed the tactile, aural, olfactory and sensual experience of music forever. I blame the damn public for being so lazy.

    ...

    Music was never as good as it was when you bought it on piano rolls at the music store. Playing music on a tin cylinder is a completely artificial and inadequate replacement for the actual sound of a real piano playing what the composer intended. The move to tin cylinders destroyed the tactile, aural, olfactory and sensual experience of music forever. I blame the damn public for being so lazy.

    ...

    Music was never as good as it was when people actually played their own instruments in their parlors, versus simply threading some cold, punched-out paper roll into an infernal automated player piano. This music is merely a faint reproduction of true music, which was meant only to be played live, by humans, and never frozen impersonally in some infernal punched paper machine. The move to player pianos destroyed the tactile, aural, olfactory and sensual experience of music forever. I blame the damn public for being so lazy.

    ...


    Exercises for the reader:

    1) Repeat for VOIP, cell phones, cordless phones, touch tone, rotary dial, party lines, connecting thru an operator, crank phones, etc.

    2) Repeat for supersonic jets, subsonic jets, prop jets, ships, buses, the Wells Fargo Express, wagon trains, and ox carts.

    3) Repeat for politics.

    4) Repeat for art.

    5) Repeat for dating and relationships.

    6) ...

    Once you've mastered the art of properly lamenting change in all areas of life, you will complete your requirements for a Masters degree in "Cranky Old Guy" at Iguana University.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 23, 2009 11:28 PM GMT
    DiverScience said
    xrichx saidE-book or real book.. does it matter? You're still reading a book. That's what really counts.

    Also, e-books saves trees. And you don't have to haul around super heavy boxes of real books whenever you move to a new place. icon_lol.gif


    As long as they can steal it off my damned reader, then yeah it matters.

    Sides, kindles just don't smell right (yeah I smell my books, what of it?). I wish the Kindle DRM didn't fucking blow goats, or I'd own one, but I also like my library.

    If DRM is your concern, then get one of the new Sony readers. Sony's online bookstore isn't quite as vast as Amazon's. But at least the Sony units have native support for PDF files and EPUB files. Lots of books out there for you to download, both legally and illegally.

    With the Kindle, you have to go through some wacky conversion process to get PDF files loaded up. And yeah, the whole remote deletion thing kinda sucks.

    http://www.engadget.com/2009/08/04/sony-reader-pocket-and-touch-editions-lower-cost-of-entry-onlin/
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    Aug 24, 2009 2:36 AM GMT


    ... nothing more to say than consider the happy hours spent reading an e-book during a power failure (which can occur during the day).icon_rolleyes.gif



  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 24, 2009 3:10 AM GMT
    I LOVE my Kindle!
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    Aug 24, 2009 6:49 PM GMT
    BradySF saidI'm all about books being smelly. Knowledge should be tangible, should have a feel. I like that books exists in libraries, in shelves, in specific places. Putting books entirely on computers loses some of the beauty, at least it does to me.



    thank you, someone doesn't think I'm crazy
  • NursePractiti...

    Posts: 232

    Aug 24, 2009 7:30 PM GMT
    I agree, we should ban ebooks of all types. Paper ones too, give me that good old sheep skin pages with monks blood on them. icon_wink.gif

    Seriously, I think the Kindle is nice, but I would prefer something I could download from somewhere other than amazon. I have all my text books on a usb flash drive after downloading them and they are much easier to carry between class. Not too mention the ones on my Iphone I read on long flights. But having said all that, I still enjoy sitting on the couch with a cup of coffee and a novel or newspaper on Sundays which I do recycle. Technology will keep advancing and the way we access information will change with it. But it doesn't mean that all that will go away. There was a quote once I read when studying photography. When Daguerreotypes came out the quote went, "this will be the end of oil portraiture." Obviously it was not. Ebooks will become more prevalent, but will never completely replace books as we know them.
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    Aug 24, 2009 8:21 PM GMT
    Delivis saidNothing wrong with e-books. But nothing beats the feeling of a real book in my hands, curled up in bed, reading by candlelight.


    I like that too, but also like having my kindle since it doesnt weight much and can have it in my gym big when I leave the hosue in the morning to catch the T to work and then home in the evening. Also the Kindle is great for when I travel, but if I just want to read at home, a hard bound book can be very nice.

    I think the Kindle and other type e-books (Ipod) will be used more and more as the source of reading.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 24, 2009 8:31 PM GMT
    Bah, Humbug! Tactile value of a book is far greater than any electronic reader. I don't want to depend on batteries or a power supply to read a book.
    Plus, what about the value of knowing you have a book that your grandfather, or Oscar Wilde, or whomever you like, owned and read?
  • jrs1

    Posts: 4388

    Aug 24, 2009 8:36 PM GMT

    I'll admit that the idea of e-books hurts my eyes ... but I have a feeling that, with a little support, local book exchanges will remain intact for us bibliophiles out there.

    " Fact: Beats, Bears, Battlestar Galactica [... and Books]. "
    - Jim Halpert, The Office
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    Aug 25, 2009 4:43 PM GMT
    I love books. But printed paper accounts for a lot of the deforestation going on.

    EBooks are easier to access (esp. for people like moi) but they hurt the eyes and nothing beats holding actual paper in your hand. Not to mention our data storage media are quite fragile, EMP/Geomagnetic storms can wipe out thousands of years of civilization without hardcopy backups.

    So yeah. Ambivalent on this one. :/ But I don't think it's because the public has gotten lazier on reading books. It's just a transfer of media. Like how theatre became movies and how bards became Britney Spears. icon_lol.gif The feeling of actually holding a book is nice, but what matters is still the content, not the medium.
  • Mikeylikesit

    Posts: 1021

    Aug 25, 2009 4:51 PM GMT
    Im all for technology & e-books....But why on gods green earth are they wasting more tax payers money on building huge libraries??...icon_eek.gificon_confused.gif
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    Aug 25, 2009 4:54 PM GMT
    Mikeylikesit saidIm all for technology & e-books....But why on gods green earth are they wasting more tax payers money on building huge libraries??...icon_eek.gificon_confused.gif


    SIMPLE!

    After the nuclear war we'll eventually have. Survivors will then sift through the ashes and ruins of the great libraries and find intact copies of books and rebuild the human civilization!

    Or not. icon_neutral.gif
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    Aug 25, 2009 7:42 PM GMT
    deforestation is nice and you guys make a valid point. maybe I'm old school and then again I;m a HUGE bibliophile ;)
    however...books don't need chargers