Post surgery weight?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 27, 2009 4:49 AM GMT
    OK, so here's the deal several months ago I had a surgery that put me on bed-rest for several months. I was unable to do much more than get up and go to the bathroom. I went from 150 lbs to 185 lbs. I pretty much ballooned. I'm 21, 5'7", and I was relatively toned before hand. All of this weight has fallen right around my waist giving me love handles (I've never had thos).

    I have never had to lose weight before. I've always maintained the best weight for my body type, so this is difficult for me to do. My question, what am I doing wrong?!? I have tried countless things to lose weight, but I cannot find anything that works. I eat less, my job is extremely physically active for 8 hours of the day, I drink water all day and keep an eye on my calories. Nothing is working!

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated. I want my health, confidence, and figure back.
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    Aug 27, 2009 6:05 PM GMT
    You're freaking out over being 185? Chill. You'll be fine if you get active, and even if not 185 is not much to be worked up about.

    It sounds like you're finally not skinny. Good for you!
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    Aug 27, 2009 6:14 PM GMT
    Did you exercise before? Do you exercise now? Are you tracking the calories you eat and the calories you burn?
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    Aug 27, 2009 6:19 PM GMT
    Unless a good deal of it is muscle, 185 is classified as overweight for someone who is 5'7" (I know I'll probably get flamed for being a skinny fairy for saying that, but it's true).

    That being said, Orph, don't get too worked up about it! It sounds like you're working hard and that's all you need, it just might take some time. Make sure that the foods you eat are low in refined carbohydrates since those are most easily deposited as fat. Try and eat more protein, whole grains and veggies and if you can, eat multiple small meals throughout the day rather than two or three large meals.
  • EricLA

    Posts: 3461

    Aug 27, 2009 6:19 PM GMT
    You're still very young, I wouldn't stress out too much. Make sure you're eating relatively healthy. I'd try to spend more time doing cardio. Assuming activity isn't a problem now, get on a treadmill or other cardio machine five days a week.

    You don't say how often you're working out or what your regimen consists of and what else you've tried since your recovery. That might be helpful for us to know.

    But, you will lose those love handles if you're burning more calories than you're taking in.

    Maybe your metabolism needs to get reset after your several months of bed rest.
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    Aug 27, 2009 10:28 PM GMT
    Here's the basic weight chart for inactive folks. Muscle weighs considerably more than fat, so folks who are fit, or who are muscular will weigh considerably more. BMI is NOT a good indicator of general health, although waist measurement is a good indicator of mortality.

    standard_weight_chart_for_men.jpg
  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    Aug 27, 2009 10:37 PM GMT
    A few additional questions for you:

    Are you on any medications related to the surgery that you weren't before? Many medications have weight gain as a listed side effect. Check yours out.

    How long has it been that you've been your current weight and trying to lose it? Fat can be added to the body much faster than it can be removed.

    You say you've stayed the same weight since you've become more active and more careful about your diet. Has the fit of your clothes changed at all? If you're gaining muscle while losing fat, you can stay the same weight -- even gain weight -- and yet be consistently getting into better shape. Your waist will contract even while your shoulders or chest or legs broaden.

    Are you eating enough? If you're spending too many more calories than you consume, your body will go into starvation mode and horde every bit of energy it can get from whatever food is available. Trying to do too much too fast can prevent you from doing anything at all.

    Beyond pure number of calories (which is probably the most important thing to consider), have you looked at how you're getting your calories? Lean meats, whole fruits and vegetables, and whole grains are a much healthier source of calories than are refined sugar and lard. A larger number of smaller meals is better for most people than a smaller number of larger meals.
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    Aug 27, 2009 10:37 PM GMT
    Chucky, what you say is true regarding muscle being denser and BMI being inaccurate as a result, but the OP says that he gained 35 lbs in (seemingly) fat while he was forced to be completely sedentary, pushing him from 150 to 185. Even if his weight gain was mostly muscle, it would still be over the upper limit as per your chart (which is really very poor as it doesn't tell you what is being defined in each cell. Is it where a certain percentile of the population with that frame falls?). Judging by the fact that he was apparently bed-ridden, I highly doubt he put on any muscle while he was convalescing.

    Edit: I managed to find a copy of the same chart, but it requires you to calculate your frame size in order for it to be accurate. We don't know the OP's frame but if he goes to this link, he can do so.

    http://www.healthchecksystems.com/heightweightchart.htm#frame

    (Orph19, please don't be offended by anything I'm saying regarding your weight)