Which came first, JOCK as an athlete, or JOCK as a jockstrap?

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    Aug 29, 2009 6:09 PM GMT
    What is the origin of the word "jock"? From Jockey maybe?
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    Aug 29, 2009 6:10 PM GMT
    OMG, I just found this...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jockstrap
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    Aug 29, 2009 6:16 PM GMT
    From the period c.1650-c.1850, 'jock' was used as slang for penis.

    The more recent slang term 'jock', meaning an athlete, is traced to 1959 and is itself derived from 'jockstrap'.

    We are PENISES! No, we are REAL PENISES.
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    Aug 29, 2009 6:23 PM GMT
    Jock as in a jockstrap came first when compared to jock as in an athlete. But before both, jock was a euphemism for the male genitals.

    So first you had jock, the male genitals. Then you had the jockstrap, the strap that held the male genitals. Then you had the jock, the athlete, who wore the jockstrap, and got the nickname jock from shortening the name of the jockstrap that he wore.

    Speaking of nickname, actually the original was ickname. Ick (originally spelled eke) meant also. So a name that you were also called was your ickname. But when you say something like "An ickname of John is Jack." It was unclear if the n belonged to An or ickname. Over time, it moved off of An and became attached to ickname. And we got nickname. Your also-name...or should I say, n-aslo-name? ... icon_lol.gif

    Edit: I gotta learn not to bother to answer these threads.
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    Aug 29, 2009 6:30 PM GMT
    Jockstrap...


    ...it straps your jock.

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    Aug 29, 2009 6:38 PM GMT

    Since the jocks needed the straps for their junk, the jock strap came after the jock, because without the jock there wouldn't have been a need to strap their junk.

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    Aug 29, 2009 6:39 PM GMT
    I once heard that the word "orchid" also refers to testicles.

    Hey, what was goin' on back in them there 1700 and 1800's? They made every word reference male genitals!

    Ah, those were the good ole days...
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    Aug 30, 2009 3:23 PM GMT
    So if someone calls you a "jock" they are also calling you a dick then... hmmmm pretty apropos for a LOT of the "jocks" I have met LOL
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    Aug 30, 2009 3:44 PM GMT
    I seem to recall that the first use of the word jock for an athlete was kinda risque, and only used among other men, not in general public speech. Indeed, even the word jockstrap was somewhat a man's private slang, the proper term being athletic supporter. You might say jockstrap or jock in the locker room, but athletic supporter, or just supporter, when you went to buy one in a store.

    When the first sports reporters and TV announcers started saying jock to describe an athlete it was a bit daring in the US, as I remember. And as noted above, it derived from the idea that male athletes at the time all wore them. They are much less common today, except in contact sports where a cup is required.
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    Aug 30, 2009 3:49 PM GMT
    Remember:
    "If you can't be an athlete, be an athletic supporter!"icon_lol.gif
  • Webster666

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    Aug 30, 2009 9:37 PM GMT
    It was originally called a "jockey strap."
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    Aug 30, 2009 9:45 PM GMT
    wrestlervic saidI once heard that the word "orchid" also refers to testicles.



    You're correct. The word orchid dates back to ancient Greece but many medical terms referring to the testes still use this nomenclature. For example, cryptorchidism (undescended testes) and macroorchidism (large testes).

    I believe the naming for the flowers came from the fact that some part of the plant in some species (I think it might be the root) is shaped like a testis.
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    Aug 31, 2009 12:27 PM GMT
    skifan08 said
    I believe the naming for the flowers came from the fact that some part of the plant in some species (I think it might be the root) is shaped like a testis.



    or·chid (ôr'kĭd)
    n.

    1.
    1. A member of the orchid family.
    2. The flower of any of these plants, especially one cultivated for ornament.
    2. A pale to light purple, from grayish to purplish pink to strong reddish purple.


    [From New Latin Orchideae, family name, from Latin orchis, a kind of orchid, from Greek orkhis, testicle, orchid (from the shape of its tubers).]
    or'chid adj.