Witricity

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    Aug 30, 2009 2:03 AM GMT
    I just found this conference on TED tonight, its truly amazing. Apparently there is a way to make electricy travel wireless using a magnetic field and it works just great. You will also see a small demonstration towards the end of this talk.

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    Aug 30, 2009 2:16 AM GMT
    WOW this is amazing and is going to open the doors for SO MANY things. I just hope nothing bad comes out of this, like the secret service developing a frequency that makes people heads explode. icon_sad.gif
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    Aug 30, 2009 2:36 AM GMT
    this shit has been going on for years, they've been able to do it for decades..

    It's inefficient, has distance problems, is energy wasting and useless.

    The technology that makes this has to be switched on, so it's always using energy regardless of if it's being used or not (think much like a radio signal, always being sent, not always being listened too)

    And while it is directional in this application, to use it in the home it would have to be omnidirectional.

    An application that will be released shortly is a mat you can sit things on, while useful, connecting a cable isn't that difficult and a lot more direct and energy efficient, plus for each item you will need to buy a connector.. hmm.. a connector icon_wink.gif

    The car was complete bullshit, who wants to plug in there electric car? what a load of bull, who wants to plug in there gas/petrol car?? besides, induction charging has already been developed and built into some cars, it was this massive paddle you slipped into the slot, the argument was that it was safer incase water got into the slot. It never took off and direct contact currant transfer is still the mainstay and there have been no reported cases (that I know of) of someone being electrocuted with a well designed plug.

    Battery technology is getting to a point where you'll have to plug in things less and less and this wireless electricity might be interesting, it's going to have a far far far less impact then what the hype says it will.
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    Aug 30, 2009 2:54 AM GMT
    lilTanker saidthis shit has been going on for years, they've been able to do it for decades..

    It's inefficient, has distance problems, is energy wasting and useless.

    The technology that makes this has to be switched on, so it's always using energy regardless of if it's being used or not (think much like a radio signal, always being sent, not always being listened too)

    And while it is directional in this application, to use it in the home it would have to be omnidirectional.

    An application that will be released shortly is a mat you can sit things on, while useful, connecting a cable isn't that difficult and a lot more direct and energy efficient, plus for each item you will need to buy a connector.. hmm.. a connector icon_wink.gif

    The car was complete bullshit, who wants to plug in there electric car? what a load of bull, who wants to plug in there gas/petrol car?? besides, induction charging has already been developed and built into some cars, it was this massive paddle you slipped into the slot, the argument was that it was safer incase water got into the slot. It never took off and direct contact currant transfer is still the mainstay and there have been no reported cases (that I know of) of someone being electrocuted with a well designed plug.

    Battery technology is getting to a point where you'll have to plug in things less and less and this wireless electricity might be interesting, it's going to have a far far far less impact then what the hype says it will.


    I have no clue how this works in detail but it seems to be in a very immature phase still this doesnt mean it has no potential to become more efficient and effective, it only means this technology needs more support and research to make it happen. I do think the idea as a concept is a way better alternative than wire conducted electricity.

    Im pretty sure they could find a way so this equipment would be sending a radio signal first searching for devices to be powered and once it gets a response from the device it could trigger the switch to send electricity trough a magnetic field back to the device. Of course this would require some radio receptor on the device itself but this could be something easily attachable.

    Again I have no idea of how this really works, but just because it doesnt work perfectly doesnt mean it has no potential. There are very smart scientists out there capable to figure it out if they really want to.
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    Aug 30, 2009 3:06 AM GMT
    lilTanker said
    It's inefficient, has distance problems, is energy wasting and useless.


    It's actually about 75-80% efficient at this point. Wires also have distance and efficiency problems. "Useless" is obviously hyperbolic.

    I'm not sure how much energy it would really be wasting (compared to convention) in a home application since so many of the devices it is intended to power use standby modes.

    As far as connectors, though they obviously present familiar inconveniences at this point, they are still neater than corded chargers. Further, if this technology were to catch on, phones etc would probably just be built with the receiving hardware standard.

    I honestly have no idea about the car, so I'm not going to argue.
  • CincyBOJ

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    Aug 30, 2009 3:07 AM GMT
    Cool stuf. thanks for posting


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    Aug 30, 2009 3:09 AM GMT
    Tessla descovered how to wirelessly transfer electricity back when he and edison were competing in their experiements. he found that with a giant Tessla coil, it could be pumped through the air.... even managed to illuminate light bulbs in a field from a mile away by that technique. he'd planned on having a monstrous Tessla coil built in NYC to power it wirelessly, but halfway through the construction the funding ran out and the building was later dismantled. we're just now realizing how much better Tessla's approaches to electricity were than Edison's... or at least that they hold more untapped potential than was previously thought
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    Aug 30, 2009 3:14 AM GMT
    charlitos said
    I have no clue how this works in detail but it seems to be in a very immature phase still this doesnt mean it has no potential to become more efficient and effective, it only means this technology needs more support and research to make it happen. I do think the idea as a concept is a way better alternative than wire conducted electricity.

    Im pretty sure they could find a way so this equipment would be sending a radio signal first searching for devices to be powered and once it gets a response from the device it could trigger the switch to send electricity trough a magnetic field back to the device. Of course this would require some radio receptor on the device itself but this could be something easily attachable.

    Again I have no idea of how this really works, but just because it doesnt work perfectly doesnt mean it has no potential. There are very smart scientists out there capable to figure it out if they really want to.

    I've a pretty good understanding of how this works.

    For larger applications yes, it has a use, imagine being able to set up 20 towers to transmit energy from say sydney to perth.. no masses of wire, just a couple of towers each one powered by the transmission.

    That's incredible.

    Same thing, the idea of putting photovoltaic panels in space to collect energy and transmit it to earth, could seriously be an application in that for massive power generation.

    In the home though, I don't think it has such a place, the power usage of a home is primarily made up of larger items, fridges, washers, dishwashers, heaters, tv's and so on, they are all stationary and large power draws (excluding portable tvs of course)

    The main items in a home that are portable are phones, remote controls, portable media players and the like, small objects. these could potentially benefit this technology too to an extent.

    The problem here is that manufacturers need to come to an agreement for how they will accomplish something like this, otherwise, everyone will be releasing there own version and then your back to everyone having different things and the clutter and waste.

    The technology is already pretty mature, far more then what this man in the ted talks video leads you on to believe, merchantable products have been produced but the problem lies in the execution, you still have to plug something into the device you want to charge, say you have a nokia phone, an apple iphone, a samsung phone, a rechargable remote control for the tv (logitech comes to mind) you'd have to buy a little dongle for each and everyone of them for this technology to work now.

    Thats just a pain in the arse and no more useful then using a powerpack which will charge the phone faster and more efficiently.

    The technology does need more work however, one thing it suffers is being unable to maintain a tight transmission, if you project the energy forwards as you get further and further away the energy fans out and so, much is lost when it reaches the destination, this is the biggest reason its being held up for larger applications since there are already MASSIVE applications just waiting to get there hands on this stuff.

    I'm not trying to say this doesn't have a use, it has big uses just, not really in the home.
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    Aug 30, 2009 3:19 AM GMT
    superchump said
    lilTanker said
    It's inefficient, has distance problems, is energy wasting and useless.


    It's actually about 75-80% efficient at this point. Wires also have distance and efficiency problems. "Useless" is obviously hyperbolic.

    Wire has very very little lose, on the scale of an entire country, yes, massive quantities of power is lost, but this technology isn't anywhere near capable of handling the sorts of power that transmission lines can handle.

    Like I mentioned in my previous post though, transmitting power through the air isn't anything like a wire, the signal fans out and starts to weaken, unlike a powerful which is a very very thin line through space.

    But useless was a bad choice in words

    80% efficiency is terrible for power transportation, once the energy is generated, transmitting it over a cable is a thousand times more efficient even taking into account the resistance of the wire
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    Aug 30, 2009 3:21 AM GMT
    lilTanker said
    I've a pretty good understanding of how this works.

    For larger applications yes, it has a use, imagine being able to set up 20 towers to transmit energy from say sydney to perth.. no masses of wire, just a couple of towers each one powered by the transmission.

    That's incredible.

    Same thing, the idea of putting photovoltaic panels in space to collect energy and transmit it to earth, could seriously be an application in that for massive power generation.

    In the home though, I don't think it has such a place, the power usage of a home is primarily made up of larger items, fridges, washers, dishwashers, heaters, tv's and so on, they are all stationary and large power draws (excluding portable tvs of course)

    The main items in a home that are portable are phones, remote controls, portable media players and the like, small objects. these could potentially benefit this technology too to an extent.

    The problem here is that manufacturers need to come to an agreement for how they will accomplish something like this, otherwise, everyone will be releasing there own version and then your back to everyone having different things and the clutter and waste.

    The technology is already pretty mature, far more then what this man in the ted talks video leads you on to believe, merchantable products have been produced but the problem lies in the execution, you still have to plug something into the device you want to charge, say you have a nokia phone, an apple iphone, a samsung phone, a rechargable remote control for the tv (logitech comes to mind) you'd have to buy a little dongle for each and everyone of them for this technology to work now.

    Thats just a pain in the arse and no more useful then using a powerpack which will charge the phone faster and more efficiently.

    The technology does need more work however, one thing it suffers is being unable to maintain a tight transmission, if you project the energy forwards as you get further and further away the energy fans out and so, much is lost when it reaches the destination, this is the biggest reason its being held up for larger applications since there are already MASSIVE applications just waiting to get there hands on this stuff.

    I'm not trying to say this doesn't have a use, it has big uses just, not really in the home.


    so we only need to wait for manufactures to implement this technology in their new releases and that should solve a good part of the problem, in the mean time while this new "adventure" becomes the standard, they can continue their research to make this technology more effective.
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    Aug 30, 2009 3:22 AM GMT
    czarodziej saidwe're just now realizing how much better Tessla's approaches to electricity were than Edison's... or at least that they hold more untapped potential than was previously thought


    It's only reasonable that wireless energy transfer hasn't caught on. We knew how to transfer electricity safely with wires; we did not know how to transfer safely and effectively without them. We decided to wire up; after all, almost nothing was portable. Then, after god knows how much money was spent on wired infrastructure, it just didn't make sense to change our ways for the limited extra benefits of wireless.

    Now that we are interested in much different projects than we were a century ago, wireless energy transfer by magnetic induction or microwaves seems much more appealing.
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    Aug 30, 2009 4:20 AM GMT
    charlitos said
    so we only need to wait for manufactures to implement this technology in their new releases and that should solve a good part of the problem, in the mean time while this new "adventure" becomes the standard, they can continue their research to make this technology more effective.
    it's a whole lot more complicated, hell phone manufacturers only recently agreed to standerdise charging units and that wont see the light of day until 2010

    besides we've have wireless power transmission for ages and it hasn't really gotten anywhere yet and it's far more advanced and researched
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    Aug 30, 2009 5:35 AM GMT
    czarodziej saidTessla descovered how to wirelessly transfer electricity back when he and edison were competing in their experiements. he found that with a giant Tessla coil, it could be pumped through the air.... even managed to illuminate light bulbs in a field from a mile away by that technique. he'd planned on having a monstrous Tessla coil built in NYC to power it wirelessly, but halfway through the construction the funding ran out and the building was later dismantled. we're just now realizing how much better Tessla's approaches to electricity were than Edison's... or at least that they hold more untapped potential than was previously thought


    Tesla was awesome! One of the most original thinkers and inventors of all time.