Overworking myself

  • sfboy987

    Posts: 209

    Aug 30, 2009 8:38 PM GMT
    So how much excercise is too much excercise? I want to lose body fat, and I have in the past by going to the gym and doing weights/cardio 3 times a week. However, I feel like I can push myself a lot more. Maybe I'm just not working hard enough on my workout days, but I feel I can keep going longer. I was thinking of a new workout program where I still do weights/cardio 3 times a week and then run like 6 miles on three more days of the week. I was possibly thinking of doing even more than this, but I heard resting after lifting weights is really important too. Would working out more mean boosting my caloric intake as well, or can I just leave it at 2000 like I usually do?
  • jrc2005

    Posts: 74

    Aug 30, 2009 9:36 PM GMT
    You'll probably get many different answers to this. But, it is difficult to lose fat while maintaining or even increasing lean mass. There are no perfect answers to it. Depending on your body type, it can also be difficult to do as much cardio as you're talking about and not lose lean mass or it can at least make maintaining or gaining lean mass more difficult. It's all about striking the right balance of calories in, calories out, and being sure your body has enough resources (through diet and through rest) to repair after lifting. *shrugs*
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    Aug 30, 2009 11:01 PM GMT
    There are several ways to guage over-training. The easiest is to take your morning pulse (wake up, lie there for a moment to let it seettle, then take it). A sudden rise of more than 5 beats per minute means it's time to rest.

    Other signs: difficulty sleeping, persistent soreness, mental dullness.

    Most serious athlete tend to train too much, not too little. Everyone wants to do more. There's wisdom in "train, don't strain". Keeping the routines varied is a big mental help.

    In endurance sports one thing we stress is learning to listen to the body, and developing an internal clock for knowing how hard we're going. You can do the same with food, and the signs of eating too little are the same as above.

    Drink lots of water.
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    Aug 31, 2009 2:34 AM GMT
    sfboy987 saidSo how much excercise is too much excercise? I want to lose body fat, and I have in the past by going to the gym and doing weights/cardio 3 times a week. However, I feel like I can push myself a lot more. Maybe I'm just not working hard enough on my workout days, but I feel I can keep going longer. I was thinking of a new workout program where I still do weights/cardio 3 times a week and then run like 6 miles on three more days of the week. I was possibly thinking of doing even more than this, but I heard resting after lifting weights is really important too. Would working out more mean boosting my caloric intake as well, or can I just leave it at 2000 like I usually do?


    By being so lazy / scared as to be a profile-less, and picture-less, you don't provide enough information to answer the question in a qualified way. Had you taken time to think, even for a moment, you would have known that before posing the question. We don't even know what you look like, to make the most basic of judgments. You've shot yourself in the foot on this one.

    We can't even guess at calories without knowing body mass, and activity levels, so, that part is unanswerable, in any qualified way.

    We don't know your history, and you haven't put it forward. A well-trained individual with adequate calories can train much harder, and rest, can recover much faster and train with a higher intensity than someone just starting out. If someone is inexperienced, never been an athlete, they won't be able to train with the seem intensity as someone who has been doing it for decades.

    Here's something you need to know: anything worth doing should be worth doing well. If you want people to answer you in a qualified way, you have to put forth the information requires to answer that question in a qualified way. You need to approach your goals in that way, if you wish to formulate a plan for success. Come prepared.

    2000 calories would be on the very, very, very, low end of adequate calories. Unless you're very tiny, that's way short. At 160#, and 12% fat, you'd need about 2820 calories, just to maintain a sedentary lifestyle. Add 600 for working out. Add 600 for trying to gain. 2000 calories would be a plan for failure under almost all conditions.
  • sfboy987

    Posts: 209

    Aug 31, 2009 4:04 AM GMT
    Alright I don't know what the fuck your problem is, but if you're deliberately and blatantly going to write such a rude response, then why the fuck respond at all? I could easily answer some of your questions, but after reading your very ignorant remarks, all I'll say is FUCK OFF BITCH


    chuckystud said
    sfboy987 saidSo how much excercise is too much excercise? I want to lose body fat, and I have in the past by going to the gym and doing weights/cardio 3 times a week. However, I feel like I can push myself a lot more. Maybe I'm just not working hard enough on my workout days, but I feel I can keep going longer. I was thinking of a new workout program where I still do weights/cardio 3 times a week and then run like 6 miles on three more days of the week. I was possibly thinking of doing even more than this, but I heard resting after lifting weights is really important too. Would working out more mean boosting my caloric intake as well, or can I just leave it at 2000 like I usually do?


    By being so lazy / scared as to be a profile-less, and picture-less, you don't provide enough information to answer the question in a qualified way. Had you taken time to think, even for a moment, you would have known that before posing the question. We don't even know what you look like, to make the most basic of judgments. You've shot yourself in the foot on this one.

    We can't even guess at calories without knowing body mass, and activity levels, so, that part is unanswerable, in any qualified way.

    We don't know your history, and you haven't put it forward. A well-trained individual with adequate calories can train much harder, and rest, can recover much faster and train with a higher intensity than someone just starting out. If someone is inexperienced, never been an athlete, they won't be able to train with the seem intensity as someone who has been doing it for decades.

    Here's something you need to know: anything worth doing should be worth doing well. If you want people to answer you in a qualified way, you have to put forth the information requires to answer that question in a qualified way. You need to approach your goals in that way, if you wish to formulate a plan for success. Come prepared.

    2000 calories would be on the very, very, very, low end of adequate calories. Unless you're very tiny, that's way short. At 160#, and 12% fat, you'd need about 2820 calories, just to maintain a sedentary lifestyle. Add 600 for working out. Add 600 for trying to gain. 2000 calories would be a plan for failure under almost all conditions.
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    Aug 31, 2009 4:14 AM GMT
    sfboy987 saidAlright I don't know what the fuck your problem is, but if you're deliberately and blatantly going to write such a rude response, then why the fuck respond at all? I could easily answer some of your questions, but after reading your very ignorant remarks, all I'll say is FUCK OFF BITCH


    chuckystud said
    sfboy987 saidSo how much excercise is too much excercise? I want to lose body fat, and I have in the past by going to the gym and doing weights/cardio 3 times a week. However, I feel like I can push myself a lot more. Maybe I'm just not working hard enough on my workout days, but I feel I can keep going longer. I was thinking of a new workout program where I still do weights/cardio 3 times a week and then run like 6 miles on three more days of the week. I was possibly thinking of doing even more than this, but I heard resting after lifting weights is really important too. Would working out more mean boosting my caloric intake as well, or can I just leave it at 2000 like I usually do?


    By being so lazy / scared as to be a profile-less, and picture-less, you don't provide enough information to answer the question in a qualified way. Had you taken time to think, even for a moment, you would have known that before posing the question. We don't even know what you look like, to make the most basic of judgments. You've shot yourself in the foot on this one.

    We can't even guess at calories without knowing body mass, and activity levels, so, that part is unanswerable, in any qualified way.

    We don't know your history, and you haven't put it forward. A well-trained individual with adequate calories can train much harder, and rest, can recover much faster and train with a higher intensity than someone just starting out. If someone is inexperienced, never been an athlete, they won't be able to train with the seem intensity as someone who has been doing it for decades.

    Here's something you need to know: anything worth doing should be worth doing well. If you want people to answer you in a qualified way, you have to put forth the information requires to answer that question in a qualified way. You need to approach your goals in that way, if you wish to formulate a plan for success. Come prepared.

    2000 calories would be on the very, very, very, low end of adequate calories. Unless you're very tiny, that's way short. At 160#, and 12% fat, you'd need about 2820 calories, just to maintain a sedentary lifestyle. Add 600 for working out. Add 600 for trying to gain. 2000 calories would be a plan for failure under almost all conditions.


    Your attitude is why you continue to fail. LOL. I'm the one with the trophies...you aren't coachable, and that's why you suck at it.
  • sfboy987

    Posts: 209

    Aug 31, 2009 4:18 AM GMT
    Well for your information I have already lost weight in the past following my own regimine and the advice of other, more polite people. Don't even bother answering my threads if you're gonna come in with that kind of attitude
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    Aug 31, 2009 4:24 AM GMT
    You still suck at it. You asked, and you got the best answer you could be given, given the information presented. Now, you're pouting because you got the right answer. No wonder you're so bad at it.

    The problem isn't your bad training, but, other issues, especially in the way that you reject advice of experts.

    Now, you're lashing out at me for telling you how to compute your calories, and for telling you how to plan for success.

    How infantile. THINK, then, create a plan for success.

    Don't pose a question if you don't want an answer.

    I'm hardly ignorant...you see...I'm the one that's 5'5", 215, and built to the gills. I didn't happen by accident. It happened by design and the fact that I listened to many of my peers. You would do will to listen a lot more, and complain a lot less.

    http://www.bodybuilders.com/chuckg.htm read it and weep Little Buddy.

    I feel bad for you, hiding behind misdirected anger at others for your ongoing failures.
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    Aug 31, 2009 4:29 AM GMT
    Chuckystud, Im surprised you didnt tell him to use steroids. Seems to be your solution to everything on this site.
  • sfboy987

    Posts: 209

    Aug 31, 2009 4:36 AM GMT
    Bravo you must feel really good after writing that message. I don't know if you're taking steroids or if you have some other problems, but I'm not the one who lashed out at you. Before you write again, why don't you "think." I don't lash out at other people who give me advice, and I certainly do not reject others advice. You have some serious issues man because I certainly am not the one picking fights with random guys. Again, you do not know me, so how could you possibly make any judgements on my failures or achievements? Instead of leaving more insults, I will just leave the thread open for other people and ignore any further responses you feel the need to write.
  • jrs1

    Posts: 4388

    Aug 31, 2009 9:37 AM GMT

    this is a book that has been thrown around for a bit, see if it helps:

    The New Rules of Lifting.

    check your work-out regimen with the following:

    Sam31488

    Yalemarine

    Cannuck
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    Aug 31, 2009 5:13 PM GMT
    sfboy987 saidBravo you must feel really good after writing that message. I don't know if you're taking steroids or if you have some other problems, but I'm not the one who lashed out at you. Before you write again, why don't you "think." I don't lash out at other people who give me advice, and I certainly do not reject others advice. You have some serious issues man because I certainly am not the one picking fights with random guys. Again, you do not know me, so how could you possibly make any judgements on my failures or achievements? Instead of leaving more insults, I will just leave the thread open for other people and ignore any further responses you feel the need to write.


    Little One, you're still missing the point. You had no profile; you presented no information; you got sound advice on how to compute your calories; to understand what is over-training for one guy isn't for another; that you should come to anything you want to do well prepared. Instead of a thank you, and providing the information requested, you lashed out because your ego wasn't stroked.

    That's why you fail. Your view it as never your fault. You put forth a minimal effort. You don't listen. You distract from the question, which I answered in the most qualified way possible, and explained why a more definitive answer could not be given. Even then, you persist in a plan for failure.

    When you're a good CEO, you realize you don't know everything; surround yourself with experts; make a plan for success. You've failed, miserably, here.

    You completely lost sight of your goal.

    The proper way to have proceeded would have been to say thank you, complete your profile, and upload a picture, and state your weight, body fat percentage, talk about what you eat, and detailed your current workout regimen. Instead, because you got told to come to the game prepared you started lashing out, instead of doing what you should have. That's why you're a mess.
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    Aug 31, 2009 5:24 PM GMT
    chuckystud you're being way to harsh, he asked for advice.

    If you don't have constructive criticism then don't say anything. You could have gone about making your point through asking questions instead of being so adversarial if you really wanted to be helpful, which is what he was asking for.

    He asked a honest question that a lot of guys have. It was the potential for a candid discussion of a common concern, it didn't have to turn into a "you failed" thread.

    Finding the balance starts somewhere and shooting down a guy for starting that process is a sign of an impatient, intolerant and out of touch CEO.

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    Aug 31, 2009 5:31 PM GMT
    He wanted a specific answer and was told how to get one, as well as given a non-specific answer with an explanation of why a more qualified answer couldn't be given. Instead of helping himself, by taking advantage of my generosity, he behaved in an infantile way.

    At the end of the day, the loss of expert advice, from someone who does what he wants to, over and over, at a national level, is his loss.

    As a CEO, I expect people to come to the meeting ready to go; if they don't, to come back with the problems fixed.

    There's no rationale for what you've presented.

    I spent 11 years in commercial broadcasting. Every time, BEFORE I opened the mike, I knew what I was going to say, as do any pro broadcasters. I respected my audience, and myself, by being prepared, and succinct. The original poster would do well to take that away from this discussion.

    I repeat: anything worth doing should be worth doing well. You don't lash out at the folks that came to help you. You admit you fucked up, get up, fix what's wrong, and go at it again, until you reach your goal. Unfortunately, the immaturity / volatile nature / lack of leadership skills of the original poster didn't allow him to behave properly in that situation. He clearly hasn't been in a performance oriented environment.

    The view that someone asking for generosity doesn't somehow have an obligation to be prepared is warped, at best.

    The original poster had no respect for his audience by being so ill-prepared. He had even less respect because instead of fixing the problem and moving forward, he lashed out. That's a plan for failure. I suspect he has a long pattern of behaving so poorly, and, that's part of the reason why he's a picture-less, angry, and so on.

    The proper response would have been: Oops, my bad. Let me give you more detail so we can figure this out. Instead, he lashed out. I'd fire him, if he worked for me.
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    Aug 31, 2009 6:21 PM GMT
    If you don't like what Chuckystud has to say, you can always ignore his posts. That's what I did, just got tired of his comments. He is way too arrogant and rude.
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    Aug 31, 2009 6:24 PM GMT
    Mike85284 saidIf you don't like what Chuckystud has to say, you can always ignore his posts. That's what I did, just got tired of his comments. He is way too arrogant and rude.


    The first person I've done that too... Thanks Mike!
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    Aug 31, 2009 6:29 PM GMT
    I've read that resistance training will burn more calories in the long run than extended periods of cardio. Muscles require energy to function, so the more muscle you have, the more carbs/fats and calories you burn.
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    Aug 31, 2009 10:29 PM GMT
    Absolutely. Common Sense 101. Lean body mass burns calories, just sitting there. Fat doesn't. If you know how fat someone is, and how much they weigh, it's easy to compute their caloric basal requirement, as I explained above, much to the whining of the original poster. However, without all the information in hand, you can't give very specific advice.
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    Sep 01, 2009 1:20 AM GMT
    Resting muscle does not burn as many calories as we think. One of the common misconceptions in fitness circles is that a pound of muscle will burn 30 to 50 calories a day. The actual amount is much less.
    From the an article on the web page of the American Council of Exercise

    http://www.acefitness.org/fitnessqanda/fitnessqanda_display.aspx?CMP=EMC-HET_0309&itemid=358

    Muscle tissue has been observed to burn roughly seven to 10 calories per pound per day, compared to two to three calories per pound per day for fat. Therefore, if you replace a pound of fat with a pound of muscle, you can expect to burn only approximately four to six more calories a day.Given the fact that the average person who strength trains typically gains approximately 3 to 5 pounds of muscle mass over a period of three to four months, the net caloric effect of such a training regimen is very modest-only 15 to 30 calories per day (the equivalent of a few potato chips).

    That doesn't sound too motivating. But then again, every little bit helps, right? If you were to decide to either burn 15-30 more calories per day or NOT, wouldn't you still choose to burn it? I would. Over time, it adds up. That's 450-900 more calories burned per month, or 5,400-10,800 more calories burned in a year—that's about a 3-pound weight loss, simply by building and preserving your muscle mass. That sounds pretty good to me!

    one pound of fat equals 3500 calories
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    Sep 01, 2009 2:05 AM GMT
    chuckystud said
    2000 calories would be on the very, very, very, low end of adequate calories. Unless you're very tiny, that's way short. At 160#, and 12% fat, you'd need about 2820 calories, just to maintain a sedentary lifestyle. Add 600 for working out. Add 600 for trying to gain. 2000 calories would be a plan for failure under almost all conditions.

    That's completely ridiculous. Most people, especially if they have a sedentary lifestyle, would become a lard ass if they ate 2800 calories a day.

    To lose weight, the Abs Diet recommends just under 1900. Dean Ornish (who knows a thing or two about fitness and nutrition) has a diet plan that recommends a little over 1500. The Volumetrics diet based on Penn State research also recommends around 1500 calories a day.
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    Sep 01, 2009 3:30 PM GMT
    [quote][cite]over_and_over said[/cite]
    Mike85284 saidIf you don't like what Chuckystud has to say, you can always ignore his posts. That's what I did, just got tired of his comments. He is way too arrogant and rude.


    Add me to the list. You can be blunt when needed, but one tires of constant rudeness, most especially when an honest question is asked.