My own unintentional demonstration of the antibiotic properties of cranberries.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 07, 2007 6:05 PM GMT
    In case you didn't know, cranberries not only pack vitamin C, but also have anitbiotic properties.

    Cranberry Juice Shows Promise as Alternative to Antibiotics (scroll down to this section)

    The above article describes the antibiotic characteristics of cranberries against E. coli and gential herpes infections. However, I figure it has the ability of helping to clear the body of its bacterial load in general.

    So I have been juicing fresh cranberries, along with apples, to make a homemade cran-apple juice. I drink the juice (duh!) and put the mash that is left over out in special compost pile in the garden.

    The compost pile is growing. The mashes are decaying and being totally covered with fungus....EXCEPT the cranberry mash. I interpret this as the antibiotic properties of the cranberry mash preventing the fungi from growing. It will be interesting to see how long the cranberry mash holds out.
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    Dec 07, 2007 10:03 PM GMT
    Groundbreaking work Caslon! But seriously, you could be onto something.
  • Squarejaw

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    Dec 07, 2007 10:20 PM GMT
    Maybe it's the vodka you mix with the cranberries.
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    Dec 07, 2007 10:31 PM GMT
    Most likely, there is just a difference in the pH of your pulp piles.

    That reference btw, uses a hype technique common to supplement promoters. A few statements about well-known properties of E. coli are combined with a few unremarkable statements about the product, in a way that leads the unwary reader to conclude that the product has some special properties. In fact, any tart fruit juice is likely to have the same effect.
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    Dec 07, 2007 11:31 PM GMT
    If you have any of those Ph indicator test strips test the ph of the cranberry mash. Maybe it is super acidic.
  • MikePhilPerez

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    Dec 08, 2007 12:17 AM GMT
    Why oh why is it that when there is an alternative to drugs or a possible alternative to drugs, there is always someone trying to rubbish iticon_question.gif

    If it was a drug that Caslon was talking about, no one would try and rubbish it.

    Eat your cranberries and stop complaining. You'll be healthier.

    Mike
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    Dec 08, 2007 2:04 AM GMT
    Cranberries are good HOWEVER, if your really interested in antioxidant activity and such, blueberries are the godsend of fruits. If you're interested in Vitamin C AND antioxidant activity, try making a juice with blueberries, kiwi, and a banana. The glycemic index will be a bit high (so maybe a half a banana if you're sensitive) but it's a great mix!*

    *Bananas can contribute to an extra release of seratonin in the brain which will aid in your sleeping but may cause you to oversleep if consumed in abundance.
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    Dec 08, 2007 4:52 AM GMT
    Fine. Tomorrow, weather permitting, I will take a picture and post it.

    But if you read the link, you will see that they have an indepth understanding of how the cranberry impacts the E. coli.

    And antibiotic means against life. So its antibiotic properties can work against bacteria, fungi, and viruses. It isn't "an antibiotic."

    In the case of herpes..."In a manner similar to the way the tannins in cranberries protect against bladder infection by preventing bacteria from adhering to the bladder wall, cranberries' antiviral compound, proanthocyanidin A-1, inhibits the attachment and penetration of the herpes virus."

    HWDIB!
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    Dec 08, 2007 5:05 AM GMT
    True Caslon, but the title of the article, 'Cranberry Juice Shows Promise as Alternative to Antibiotics', is referring to the medications as antibiotics without or without the article is not a general term that also covers anti-fugals or anti-virals.

    I'm am skeptical though, as it's very unusual that something would work against bacteria, fungi and viruses, and equally unusual that it would the same mechanism against these different organisms.
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    Dec 08, 2007 11:01 AM GMT
    well, wrerick, for bacteria, it is the tannins that apparently block their adhesion, and for herpes, it is proanthocyanidin A-1. I can see that.

    The anti-herpes is in separate section from the antibiotics of the article on Cranberries. I post the link so y'all can read it for yourselves.

    As for the fungi in my compost pile, they aint growing on the cranberry mash. It must be doing something.
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    Dec 08, 2007 5:39 PM GMT
    Wouldn't it be benifical to add the cranberry mush into some yogurt or say a bran muffin mix. The mush will add fiber to healthy but non fiberous foods. Also the skin of any fruit/veg has a lot of trace nutrients that can be benifical.
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    Dec 08, 2007 6:19 PM GMT
    [quote][cite][/cite]Why oh why is it that when there is an alternative to drugs or a possible alternative to drugs, there is always someone trying to rubbish it[/quote]

    Good Grief. Because some of us have spent our entire lives studying this stuff and didn't just read it off some dodgey web site.
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    Dec 08, 2007 8:09 PM GMT
    That's a good suggestion, Madsoccer. I would just have to coordinate my juicing with the other.

    I suppose I could refrigerate it for a while. Or freeze it.

    But then I juice so much that there still would be lots left over...day after day.

    I figure by composting it I will get it "back" in the veggies next year. I am thinking the mash composte would be great for the tomatoes.

    You do know the best way to plants tomatoes, dont you? hahahahahahaa ... icon_lol.gif
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    Dec 08, 2007 8:14 PM GMT
    "A series of studies led by Terri Camesano from Worcester Polytechnic Institute, the latest of which were presented September 19, 2006 at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in San Francisco, show that compounds in cranberry juice have the capacity to actually change E. coli bacteria-even strains that have become resistant to conventional treatment-in ways that render them unable to initiate an infection."

    Mindgarten, the article gives the source. It doesnt sound like some "dodgey site."

    I am coming to the conclusion that people on here dont read the links provided.
  • MikePhilPerez

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    Dec 09, 2007 2:09 AM GMT
    Well mindgarden, I think Caslon has giving you a good response.

    It's like the vitamin C studies. It has been proven in the lab (on rats) that no virus can survive vitamin C, if the cells are saturated with it. Yet they will not test it on humans. Why is that? If you don't know, I will tell you.

    Mike