Researchers claim AIDS vaccine breakthrough

  • metta

    Posts: 39090

    Sep 03, 2009 11:28 PM GMT
    Researchers claim AIDS vaccine breakthrough



    [QUOTE]



    US researchers have discovered two powerful new antibodies which could hold the key to achieving a viable AIDS vaccine, according to a study published in the journal Science.



    The antibodies are produced naturally by a minority of people infected with HIV and are able to neutralise a high percentage of the many types of the virus currently in circulation worldwide.



    Researchers in California believe they can create an effective vaccine if they are able to stimulate the body to produce such "broadly neutralising" antibodies before exposure to HIV.



    "The findings themselves are an exciting advance toward the goal of an effective AIDS vaccine because now we've got a new, potentially better target on HIV to focus our efforts for vaccine design," said Wayne Koff, senior vice president of research and development at the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative.



    "And having identified this one, we're set up to find more, which should further accelerate global efforts in AIDS vaccine development."



    These are the first broadly neutralising antibodies to have been identified in more than a decade and are the first from donors in developing countries, where 95 per cent of new HIV infections occur.

    [/QUOTE]





    Story Continues:

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2009/09/04/2676186.htm

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 04, 2009 12:51 AM GMT
    coolios!
  • DCEric

    Posts: 3713

    Sep 04, 2009 1:04 AM GMT
    Meh. I've gotten my hopes up before.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 04, 2009 3:28 AM GMT
    DCEric saidMeh. I've gotten my hopes up before.


    Any breakthrough is a good breakthrough.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 04, 2009 3:33 AM GMT
    We'll see. The Public has been down this path before. A retro-virus can be very difficult to form preventative measures against.

    Time will tell.

    Until we know: USE SOUND JUDGMENT.
  • Mepark

    Posts: 806

    Sep 04, 2009 3:43 AM GMT
    I can't tell you how many articles I've read over the years that claim the same thing.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 04, 2009 3:45 AM GMT
    I won't hold me breath on this one. But it does comfort me to know that with every failure they learn a little bit more and that all these seemingly dead ends have value even if it is sometimes only telling them what direction not to look in.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 04, 2009 4:06 AM GMT
    I stopped believing a miracle would come long ago. But every little step excites me and makes me want to fight more. Find your local AIDS Walk and participate!
  • hartfan

    Posts: 1037

    Sep 04, 2009 5:06 AM GMT
    Always be careful about putting too much stock when you see the word "breakthrough" in a news article about advances in medicine or science. The use of breakthrough would be less offensive if the writers who use it also would agree to publish a long-term follow-up--a batting average--of how many "breakthroughs" actually panned out. True breakthroughs are better measured over years, not overnight.

    There are other terms commonly used in the media that readers should be careful about when they read them.

    Cure has always been one of the most loaded and ill-defined terms used in medicine. Does it mean absence of disease? Does it mean no recurrence of once-existing disease? Does it mean today, next week, 5 years, or a "normal life expectancy"? Does it mean the same thing to doctors as it does to those they treat? The term can be quite meaningless when used flippantly.

    The story of a man who had undergone a successful lung transplant illustrates why miracle has lost its luster. The man had heard others describe the procedure and his outcome as a miracle. He said, "This was no miracle. Moses didn't come down and part my chest with his staff. A surgeon did it with a knife, and it hurt, and I had a lot of problems afterward. I'm very grateful, but this was no miracle." There is no need to elevate the accomplishments of medicine to a supernatural level. They are worthy of admiration for what they are: tremendous achievement by highly-trained, caring professionals, working with health care consumers who must do their part to increase the likelihood of a successful outcome. This reality may be lost if readers absorb the word "miracle" without critical reasoning.

    A veteran writer once chided medicine and the media by saying, "It seems like there's only two types of medical news: new hope and no hope." Audiences should decide how much "hope" to assign to each story as the word has lost its meaning when the media uses it.
  • dfrourke

    Posts: 1062

    Sep 04, 2009 5:12 AM GMT
    this doesn't sound like an AIDS vaccine breakthrough...but it does sound like significant progress...which is always good news...

    ...preventative vaccine is always a great first step...but a therapeutic vaccine is necessary as well...

    Let's hope this produces great strides.

    - David icon_wink.gif
  • stevendust

    Posts: 398

    Sep 04, 2009 5:18 AM GMT
    Even something preventative would be a help since apparently not everybody will put a condom on to prevent transmission.
  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    Sep 04, 2009 5:34 AM GMT
    Pretty much by definition, there isn't such a thing as a therapeutic vaccine, as vaccines are prophylactics. The only thing I know of which could even be called a therapeutic vaccine is for MS, and that's Copolymer 1 (glatiramer acetate), which I found reference to in a 2004 PNAS paper discussing the possibilities of the future of therapeutic vaccines.
  • dfrourke

    Posts: 1062

    Sep 04, 2009 5:42 AM GMT
    MSUBioNerd saidPretty much by definition, there isn't such a thing as a therapeutic vaccine, as vaccines are prophylactics. The only thing I know of which could even be called a therapeutic vaccine is for MS, and that's Copolymer 1 (glatiramer acetate), which I found reference to in a 2004 PNAS paper discussing the possibilities of the future of therapeutic vaccines.


    I'm not going to argue your point...which IS correct, but...

    http://www.pnas.org/content/101/suppl.2/14559.full

    - David icon_wink.gif
  • MattyC0709

    Posts: 1199

    Sep 04, 2009 9:29 AM GMT
    I hope something good comes out of this new research. Hopefully they are close to the vaccine.

    And if that doesn't work, we can always hope for something like this:







  • metta

    Posts: 39090

    Sep 05, 2009 4:43 PM GMT


    Here is an interview with Chris Smith, the "Naked Scientist" on the radio, ABC Radio National in Australia:

    in an mp3 format (you need a real player or some player to play it)

    http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2009/09/bst_20090904_0637.mp3
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 05, 2009 4:52 PM GMT
    Two questions I have:

    1. Would this vaccine have any effect on existing HIV infections, or just be preventive against new ones?
    2. Can it be produced in sufficient quantities?