These kind of records make me sad...

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 13, 2009 12:58 PM GMT
    Guy catches record 41.45-pound trout

    http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/living/2009/09/11/wwtv.record.trout.wwtv

    So he killed this magnificent fish....for what? It makes me sad when I hear about some animal being killed for sport, but esp. with all the gloating when it is some large example. ....So he took some magnificent specimen out of the gene pool. How sad.
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    Sep 13, 2009 2:05 PM GMT
    How customary is it for sporting fishers to throw back? I know nothing about fishing manners but I would agree that killing it wasn't the best thing unless he is greedy and wants it mounted. For me, a picture and local press would have been enough.
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    Sep 13, 2009 2:51 PM GMT
    I believe some sports-fishers do practice "catch & release" though I wonder how damaging that is to the fish. Still. a fish doesn't have much of a brain and they're regularly eaten alive in the wild. I'm not sure if humans fishing them is any worse.

    It does bother me when higher animals are made trophy kills, mainly deer & elk in this country. But of course one can argue that wolves eat them, too. In any case, I don't eat their meat, nor most meat these days, except for fish, other seafood and birds.
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    Sep 13, 2009 2:52 PM GMT
    Are you a vegan? I love to fish. I don't hunt much else tho.


    Me and my boys a few weeks ago in Orient Point. some great catches that day!
    tn?sid=24769797954424975&mid=ALsMDUwAALg P.S. we ate and eat our fish everytime
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    Sep 13, 2009 2:55 PM GMT
    Imagine what it feels like as a fish to have a hook lancing your mouth and then pulled with a ton of force, being pulled out of the water so you can't breathe, then having the hook ripped out of your mouth, and then being thrown back into the water so that the hook wound will get infected.

    Some sport.
  • Celticmusl

    Posts: 4330

    Sep 13, 2009 2:58 PM GMT
    If fish could scream and cry out in pain than I think the Sport Fishing industry would dwindle. Fish have a nervous system somewhat similar to ours for the most part so yeah there is pain. If your looking for something that would not feel pain it would have to be more simpler like a starfish or jellyfish.
  • jrs1

    Posts: 4388

    Sep 13, 2009 2:58 PM GMT

    I don't eat fish, so - like Pinny - I'm wondering if the fish was tossed back.
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    Sep 13, 2009 3:13 PM GMT
    icon_sad.gif
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    Sep 13, 2009 3:14 PM GMT
    I'm with you Caslon...and since we haven't had a poem from you in ages, here's a fine one from Elizabeth Bishop on the topic:

    The Fish

    I caught a tremendous fish
    and held him beside the boat
    half out of water, with my hook
    fast in a corner of his mouth.
    He didn't fight.
    He hadn't fought at all.
    He hung a grunting weight,
    battered and venerable
    and homely. Here and there
    his brown skin hung in strips
    like ancient wallpaper,
    and its pattern of darker brown
    was like wallpaper:
    shapes like full-blown roses
    stained and lost through age.
    He was speckled and barnacles,
    fine rosettes of lime,
    and infested
    with tiny white sea-lice,
    and underneath two or three
    rags of green weed hung down.
    While his gills were breathing in
    the terrible oxygen
    --the frightening gills,
    fresh and crisp with blood,
    that can cut so badly--
    I thought of the coarse white flesh
    packed in like feathers,
    the big bones and the little bones,
    the dramatic reds and blacks
    of his shiny entrails,
    and the pink swim-bladder
    like a big peony.
    I looked into his eyes
    which were far larger than mine
    but shallower, and yellowed,
    the irises backed and packed
    with tarnished tinfoil
    seen through the lenses
    of old scratched isinglass.
    They shifted a little, but not
    to return my stare.
    --It was more like the tipping
    of an object toward the light.
    I admired his sullen face,
    the mechanism of his jaw,
    and then I saw
    that from his lower lip
    --if you could call it a lip
    grim, wet, and weaponlike,
    hung five old pieces of fish-line,
    or four and a wire leader
    with the swivel still attached,
    with all their five big hooks
    grown firmly in his mouth.
    A green line, frayed at the end
    where he broke it, two heavier lines,
    and a fine black thread
    still crimped from the strain and snap
    when it broke and he got away.
    Like medals with their ribbons
    frayed and wavering,
    a five-haired beard of wisdom
    trailing from his aching jaw.
    I stared and stared
    and victory filled up
    the little rented boat,
    from the pool of bilge
    where oil had spread a rainbow
    around the rusted engine
    to the bailer rusted orange,
    the sun-cracked thwarts,
    the oarlocks on their strings,
    the gunnels--until everything
    was rainbow, rainbow, rainbow!
    And I let the fish go.

    Elizabeth Bishop
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    Sep 13, 2009 3:42 PM GMT
    Elizabeth Bishop - good choice.
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19136

    Sep 13, 2009 4:03 PM GMT
    I hate to quote Sarah Palin because I know it will pain some of you but something she said recently cracked me up because it's actually true.

    "We eat, therefor we hunt"


    If you're a vegan, I can understand having a problem with the killing of other living creatures. But, if you're not, sorry, but something has gotta die to put food on the table.
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    Sep 13, 2009 4:09 PM GMT
    I love sushi. So I'm all for killing fish. Except only ones with scales (no dolphins, no whales, no sharks, no squid, no octopus, etc.)
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    Sep 13, 2009 4:13 PM GMT
    This kind of record makes me sad

    heart-cover2.jpg
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19136

    Sep 13, 2009 4:16 PM GMT
    I remember years ago I was working as a waiter in a restaurant and after explaining to one of my tables the night's "SWORDFISH SPECIAL", one of the women at the table said "I love Swordfish but I refuse to order that because they are on the way to going extinct" to which I replied "M'am, that Swordfish in the kitchen is already dead. Please don't let that fish die in vain".
    Then she proceeded to order the Veal -- WTF??? icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Sep 13, 2009 4:51 PM GMT
    HeyJude saidThis kind of record makes me sad

    heart-cover2.jpg


    That was an amazing album.icon_biggrin.gif
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    Sep 13, 2009 5:05 PM GMT
    Celticmusl said...Fish have a nervous system somewhat similar to ours for the most part so yeah there is pain. If your looking for something that would not feel pain it would have to be more simpler like a starfish or jellyfish.

    A good observation. I believe the sensory system of fish (lateral line) is quite sensitive. But is their perception one of pain as we experience it, or merely a simple sensory input to which they respond? I just don't know.

    What about clams, oysters & mussels, all of which I eat? How about other shellfish, like lobster, shrimp & crab, more of my favorites? Can I eat them in good conscience?

    I'm honestly not being facetious, just interested in hearing the opinions of others. I do not eat sea mammals, like the Japanese do, just fish with scales.
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    Sep 13, 2009 9:21 PM GMT
    If you think that is cruel, check this out

    "Hunting BABY SEALS" is sport in Canada.
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/3618901.stm

    Don't know what kind of sick bastard would enjoy kiiling an innocent animal just for fun and too by hammering its head.

    Well if you guys feel like to help those seals here is link

    http://www.hsus.org/protectseals.html
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    Sep 13, 2009 9:56 PM GMT
    I wonder how lobster feels scenes they get boiled alive.
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    Sep 13, 2009 10:09 PM GMT
    jprichva said
    JakeBenson saidI love sushi. So I'm all for killing fish. Except only ones with scales (no dolphins, no whales, no sharks, no squid, no octopus, etc.)

    Don't let that get around or the fish will all be putting on octopus costumes when they know you're nearby.


    Oh I would never kill the fish myself. I'm too pussy and would totally cry. I would pay someone to kill it, gut it up, and serve to me as sushi so that I keep fooling myself into thinking I'm not eating a sea creature. icon_biggrin.gif
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    Sep 13, 2009 10:17 PM GMT
    CuriousJockAZ saidI remember years ago I was working as a waiter in a restaurant and after explaining to one of my tables the night's "SWORDFISH SPECIAL", one of the women at the table said "I love Swordfish but I refuse to order that because they are on the way to going extinct" to which I replied "M'am, that Swordfish in the kitchen is already dead. Please don't let that fish die in vain".
    Then she proceeded to order the Veal -- WTF??? icon_rolleyes.gif




    LMAO!
  • art_smass

    Posts: 960

    Sep 14, 2009 2:48 AM GMT
    Yes, that fish probably was a magnificent specimen, but it probably contributed to the gene pool thousands of times already.
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    Sep 14, 2009 9:22 AM GMT
    Used to do a lot of fishing. I always carry a bucket filled with water and I took my catches home and raised them in my ponds (or in rare cases, in my aquarium). Also I preferred using a net and actually wading in the waters rather than fishhooks. I fished for the primary purpose of building my own viable 'ecosystem' in my fishtanks and ponds. I caught crabs too, crayfish, water scorpions, snails, aquatic plants, etc. Even had a pond dug for the sole purpose of cultivating the aquatic plant Hydrilla verticillata (later on in uni, my teachers used to ask me for samples, as Hydrilla is an integral part of our Botany lessons, being transparent, they're ideal for teaching leaf cell structures; I later on helped in establishing their own Hydrilla 'farm' in a pond on campus).

    I even had one experiment where I mixed in the naturalized guppies in our bodies of water with the extensively hybridized fantail guppies from pet shops. The results were interesting but too difficult to actually selectively breed them. There were a lot of offspring with strange new color patterns not present in the parents. As well as another experiment where we introduced snails to a school pond.... resulting in the rapid death of the water lilies there and the subsequent drying up of the pond. ;d

    I've only eaten my catches like... once or twice. And those during picnics with some friends.
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    Sep 14, 2009 10:48 AM GMT
    I think that the true horror for a fish must be being caught in a net - dragged out of your natural environment, suffocating, crushed between hundreds of your family and friends, lingering panic and a slow miserable death. It makes me think that a hook through the mouth and a knife through the brain wouldn't be so bad.

    When people say that they don't eat meat, but they do eat fish, it makes me wonder if they've thought about what it is to die like a fish as opposed to more controlled and instant forms of death.
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    Sep 14, 2009 11:50 AM GMT
    Sedative said......Even had a pond dug for the sole purpose of cultivating the aquatic plant Hydrilla verticillata (later on in uni, my teachers used to ask me for samples, as Hydrilla is an integral part of our Botany lessons, being transparent, they're ideal for teaching leaf cell structures; I later on helped in establishing their own Hydrilla 'farm' in a pond on campus)......


    Hydrilla verticillata is considered to be an invasive weed. It is believed to have been introduced into the United States as a result of aquarium water containing Hydrilla dumped into the natural waters of Florida, but now found from coast to coast. Millions are spent each year trying to control it's spread.

    http://www.ecy.wa.gov/Programs/wq/plants/weeds/hydrilla.html
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    Sep 14, 2009 4:47 PM GMT
    PDSurfer said

    Hydrilla verticillata is considered to be an invasive weed. It is believed to have been introduced into the United States as a result of aquarium water containing Hydrilla dumped into the natural waters of Florida, but now found from coast to coast. Millions are spent each year trying to control it's spread.

    http://www.ecy.wa.gov/Programs/wq/plants/weeds/hydrilla.html


    Ya. Pretty much anything you introduce outside of its native habitat becomes pollution.

    A large amount of our freshwater lifeforms here are introduced. Tilapia nilotica, Water Hyacinths, the Golden Snail, Janitor fish, the American Bullfrog, and the aforementioned guppies for example. The guppies and the janitor fish are also from the dumping of aquarium water here. They have subsequently almost taken over the bodies of water. Pushing off the native flora and fauna. I rarely caught the native Perch, gouramis, and carp here for example.

    Hydrilla though is native here, I think. They remain in manageable numbers because they're also a food source for several fish here (the carp family and the previously mentioned Tilapia).

    A similar (more beautiful) species that also grows here is the Water Milfoil (Myriophyllum), probably introduced, and it's also an invasive species in the US. But I've only collected a couple of specimens of it and since donated it to the bio lab in the nearby university, so it's safe to say they're also under control.