Ideal & Simple Meals

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    Sep 16, 2009 12:29 AM GMT
    I've recently (last year or so) have been watching my food intake. Eating out less, cooking more. However, I'm a pretty simple guy looking for other ideas for eating heathly. I'm usually in a routine, work 8-5 Monday - Friday, and the weekend kinda kill my healthy week. Usually try to squeeze in eating 3-4 times a day.

    It would be great if everyone could share what they normally do, or have tips that have help them out.

    I have this weight that just won't go away, I'm around 170 - 175LBS. My ideal weight would around the 155LB mark.

    If you got any tips for that too, mention them!
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    Sep 16, 2009 4:15 AM GMT
    Eat more vegetables, frozen, canned, whatever, but I guess a variety of fresh ones are best. You can get those pre-made bags of salads with mixed greens. Drizzled with balsamic vinegar and olive oil, salt and pepper and maybe a little Parmesan cheese. It is something quick and easy and if you don't go crazy with dressing it is pretty nutritious.

    Also I go through a lot of bags of those frozen chicken breasts. You can buy lots of different types of marinade for flavor and moistness. Grilling them is a good option or even baking. You can make a weeks worth at a time very easily. You can also chop them up and put on salad or in soup.
  • mustangd

    Posts: 434

    Sep 16, 2009 4:28 AM GMT
    ActiveAndFit saidEat more vegetables, frozen, canned, whatever, but I guess a variety of fresh ones are best. You can get those pre-made bags of salads with mixed greens. Drizzled with balsamic vinegar and olive oil, salt and pepper and maybe a little Parmesan cheese. It is something quick and easy and if you don't go crazy with dressing it is pretty nutritious.

    Also I go through a lot of bags of those frozen chicken breasts. You can buy lots of different types of marinade for flavor and moistness. Grilling them is a good option or even baking. You can make a weeks worth at a time very easily. You can also chop them up and put on salad or in soup.


    chicken breasts in the oven as i write this. turkey works too, even lean pork from time to time to mix things up. do you like rice? brown over white, rice is low in fat, and high in protein, what you want. so, chinese stir fry is a good change up. seafood(s), though, avoid tuna, as it is listed as high in mercury ( pollutant ), not good for the central nervous system.

    lean red meat from time to time, but, its hard for your body to digest, and not good for your intestinal tract. i read once where the average american male at age 75 has 15 lbs. of red meat trapped in his intestinal tract. which reminds me, do a colon cleanse once a month or so...
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    Sep 16, 2009 4:47 AM GMT
    mustangd saidlean red meat from time to time, but, its hard for your body to digest, and not good for your intestinal tract. i read once where the average american male at age 75 has 15 lbs. of red meat trapped in his intestinal tract. which reminds me, do a colon cleanse once a month or so...
    I have to tell you I am skepitcal of the meat being trapped in your intestine thing. Did you know your stomach generates a new layer of lining about every 3 days? Anyway that does bring up another thing .. fiber. Each fruit - it's natures candy but nutritious. I like a variety: melons (watermelon is actually very high in lycopenes), apples, oranges and other citrus, nectarines, plums, berries -- I don't know how abundant they are else where, but California is the land of fruits and nuts icon_lol.gif Also things like shredded wheat or whole grain toast for breakfast is good for adding fiber to your diet. Adding berries or banana to the shredded wheat is a good way of naturally sweetening it. Kashi has lots of good grain products. http://www.kashi.com/products
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    Sep 16, 2009 11:51 AM GMT
    The whole colon cleanse thing is myth. Garbage. Jarring your system, with fasting, also doesn't do you any good. It invokes a famine response, which slows your body's metabolism. catbolizes muscle, and makes it a fat-storing machine, which really isn't a very intelligent thing to do. In fact, it's very dumb.

    Everyone has a few pounds of junk in their guts. It's how the process of digestion works. Healthy bacteria does its work on your food as it works its way through your guts. If you're overweight, you have even more gunk inside, but, the whole colon cleanse thing, like organic food, is nothing more than urban myth, with not a lick of good science to support it. You do more harm than good when you starve yourself, particularly if you're trying to optimize your metabolism for staying lean.

    A diet with real food, fiber, and plenty of water is the best way to keep your body in balance.

    If you remove the healthy bacteria from your guts, you're induce problems, too. Again, not a very bright thing.
  • HotCoach

    Posts: 247

    Sep 16, 2009 12:44 PM GMT
    Try steel cut oats for breakfast. Works for me!
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    Sep 16, 2009 2:54 PM GMT
    "Eat food, not too much, mostly vegetables."
  • mustangd

    Posts: 434

    Sep 16, 2009 3:11 PM GMT
    chuckystud saidThe whole colon cleanse thing is myth. Garbage. Jarring your system, with fasting, also doesn't do you any good. It invokes a famine response, which slows your body's metabolism. catbolizes muscle, and makes it a fat-storing machine, which really isn't a very intelligent thing to do. In fact, it's very dumb.

    Everyone has a few pounds of junk in their guts. It's how the process of digestion works. Healthy bacteria does its work on your food as it works its way through your guts. If you're overweight, you have even more gunk inside, but, the whole colon cleanse thing, like organic food, is nothing more than urban myth, with not a lick of good science to support it. You do more harm than good when you starve yourself, particularly if you're trying to optimize your metabolism for staying lean.

    A diet with real food, fiber, and plenty of water is the best way to keep your body in balance.

    If you remove the healthy bacteria from your guts, you're induce problems, too. Again, not a very bright thing.


    who mentioned fasting? in fact, cleaning our your insides is a good thing from time to time, fiber does it...
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    Sep 16, 2009 3:27 PM GMT
    Get a frozen bag of chicken tenderloins - they cost about 7 bucks and are low in fat and high in protein.

    Get Uncle Ben's whole grain instant rice in the pouches that you nuke for 90 seconds.

    Get a lemon.

    Get some Montreal Garlic and Herb chicken seasoning.

    Put 4 frozen tenderloins on a plate - and speed defrost them for about 5:30. Drain off any excess water. Sprinkle the garlic and herb seasoning on one side of the tenderloins. Get a frying pan, put about a teaspoon of olive oil in it. Turn the heat on the stove to about 6. Put the tenderloins in the pan, seasoned side down. Season the other side directly in the pan. Cover the pan. You'll hear it sizzling and about 5 minutes afterward, turn them over and cook for about 3-4 minutes. You can cut one of the tenderloins with a knife and check that there's no pink in the middle. Remove your tenderloins from the heat and start cooking your 90 second rice (just follow Uncle Ben's directions). Once your rice is done, put the four tenderloins on a plate along with 1/2 of the rice you cooked (save the other 1/2 for another time). Cut a wedge of lemon and squeeze it over everything. Mangia!

    Very simple, very yummy, very quick.
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    Sep 17, 2009 2:23 AM GMT
    Thanks for the ideas, Men!

    What does everyone usually do for a breakfast?

    I've always heard that you should snack a couple times a day? What's the word on this? Is there a standard or what do people usually do for this?
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    Sep 21, 2009 10:35 AM GMT
    Breakfast is usually flavoured porridge... Either ginger, cinnamon, coconut or vanilla. Sometimes I have two slices of wholemeal toast with vegemite, and very occasionally I go nuts and have 2 pop tarts. Wraps sometimes, too.

    I have a morning tea snack of nuts, then lunch is usually left overs from the night before.

    For dinner, I make a huge range of things, but always three or more serves at once for lunches and backup dinner on busy nights. I poach chicken, make curries, make wraps. Dinner tonight was pork rissoles using low fat pork mince, chilli, coriander, spring onions, soy sauce and peanuts.
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    Sep 21, 2009 11:11 AM GMT
    Not to sound like I've drank too much RJ kool-aide, but I signed up for Nutrition 4 You and they've had some really interesting ideas on how to improve my diet. I'm vegetarian and struggle to keep muscle, and low-and-behold I find out I'm running about 50% of my protein needs.

    Snacking is definitely recommended - don't go more than 4 hours without eating something (usually fruit and a protein) and don't skip breakfast.

    Nu4you.net also gives out some shopping lists of what to buy at the grocery store, based on your activity level and caloric intake. They've got some things on the menu I'd never have thought of. So, that would speak directly to what you're looking for.

    If you go with meat - go for very lean meats, like chicken, and avoid high-fat meats like bacon, or full-fat cheese.

    Good luck, but you look great as is!
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    Sep 21, 2009 11:19 AM GMT
    chuckystud saidThe whole colon cleanse thing is myth. Garbage. Jarring your system, with fasting, also doesn't do you any good. It invokes a famine response, which slows your body's metabolism. catbolizes muscle, and makes it a fat-storing machine, which really isn't a very intelligent thing to do. In fact, it's very dumb.

    Everyone has a few pounds of junk in their guts. It's how the process of digestion works. Healthy bacteria does its work on your food as it works its way through your guts. If you're overweight, you have even more gunk inside, but, the whole colon cleanse thing, like organic food, is nothing more than urban myth, with not a lick of good science to support it. You do more harm than good when you starve yourself, particularly if you're trying to optimize your metabolism for staying lean.

    A diet with real food, fiber, and plenty of water is the best way to keep your body in balance.

    If you remove the healthy bacteria from your guts, you're induce problems, too. Again, not a very bright thing.



    The fast that you are probably talking about is the Master Cleanse. Which I believe ranges from 1 week to 1 month in time and yes you're basically starving yourself.It's suppose to not only cleanses your colon but your liver and other body parts.It is meant to "Cleanse" the body and not be used as a weight lost thingy

    Colonics are great to help get the digested food from the walls of your colon/intestines that have been there for a while. If you do colonics to much you can damage some stuff down there or end up dead. I believe there have been 2 deaths in the U.S from colonics. You can either do it at home or have a professional do it.

    The reason why some people choose to eat organic food over the other kind(whatever you called it) is because organic isn't sprayed with that pesticide stuff to keep bugs from eatting at it.

    icon_biggrin.gif
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    Sep 21, 2009 11:21 AM GMT
    jd24boy saidThanks for the ideas, Men!

    What does everyone usually do for a breakfast?

    I've always heard that you should snack a couple times a day? What's the word on this? Is there a standard or what do people usually do for this?


    For breakfast I usually try and eat a bowl of muesli or low-sugar granola with milk (sometimes yogurt) and a fruit or some pieces of a big fruit. I try eating more, but I just can't manage to fit more into my stomach in the morning.

    For snacks I generally eat fruit or something like PB&J on whole wheat bread, but sometimes I'll eat a little junk-food like a couple of cookies or crackers or chips. There's really nothing wrong with a little bad stuff in moderation. And, it's not always easy to get your hands on healthy stuff, especially if you're out of the house and not near a supermarket.
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    Sep 21, 2009 11:29 AM GMT
    Consider a smoothie for breakfast - good way to get additional fruit.

    Like many people, I'd say snacks (the right ones) are a good idea and I eat every few hours as well. Nuts are always good. Carrots, hummus, yogurt, peanut butter are other ideas...
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    Sep 24, 2009 10:55 PM GMT
    What kinda shakes or smoothies are there to make that are good kick start in the morning?

    Is it better to run then eat? or eat then run?

    I have to make a list here soon to grab stuff at the store, for a week of good strong healthy eatting. So if you have any ideas on that, let me know.
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    Sep 26, 2009 8:47 AM GMT
    take half a cup of rice and a cup of water and put in a non stick pan. Bring to the boil then turn the flame right down and leave for about 20 mins, til cooked

    Take a chicken breast and cut in half down the middle (so it´s not so fat), or use chicken tenders. Put in a bowl with the juice of half a lemon, salt, cumin, chili pepper and leave for 5-10 mins. Dry fry the chicken or cook on a griddle (dry fry is in a non stick pan with no oil)

    Put a lot of spinach on a plate, put the rice to one side of the plate and then put the cooked chicken on top, season with pepper, more lemon juice and a little olive oil.

    Takes 20-25 mins.

  • twostroke

    Posts: 184

    Sep 26, 2009 9:18 AM GMT
    HELP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    I NEED A CHEF
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    Sep 27, 2009 4:15 PM GMT
    I'm with TwoStroke
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    Sep 27, 2009 7:47 PM GMT
    I found this in on my computer. My favorites are # 21 and # 25.

    50 Ways to Feed Your Muscles
    By Phillip Rhodes
    Men's Health

    Every family argues about what to eat for dinner. But the Shrader family of Bluebell, West Virginia, took dinner-table combat to a whole new level last summer when 49-year-old Jackie Lee and his son, Harley Lee, 24, whipped out .22-caliber pistols and exchanged fire after sparring over how to cook their meal.

    What food could trigger a kitchen gun battle? The harmless, boneless, skinless—and often flavorless—chicken breast, that's what.

    Sure, this omnipresent cut of poultry is the leanest source of protein this side of tofu or fish—a single serving offers 26 grams of protein for the price of 1 gram of saturated fat. But it's boring as hell. And it doesn't help that most people eat their annual average of 88 pounds one of two ways: soaked in Italian salad dressing or slathered in barbecue sauce.

    In my mind, that's exactly how I hear the Shrader feud erupting. "Marinade!" one might have said. "No! Barbecue sauce," the other yelled. Back and forth it went until it came to blows, then bullets. (Harley Lee took a slug to the head, but managed to survive.)

    That's why I came up with this list—not one, not two, but 50 different ways to prepare a chicken breast. What good is eating healthy food if the boredom nearly kills you?

    STIR-FRYING

    Basic technique: Cut the raw chicken into bite-sized pieces or thin strips. Cook them in a nonstick skillet or wok over medium-high heat for 3 to 5 minutes or until browned. Then add the remaining ingredients in the order listed. Cook for 5 more minutes, stirring frequently.
    Tip: Sesame oil gives stir-fries their distinct flavor. Its nutritional profile is similar to that of olive oil (i.e., high in the unsaturated fats you want). But if you don't have sesame, use canola or peanut oil, since olive oil can burn at high temperatures.

    1. 1 Tbsp reduced-sodium soy sauce; 2 tsp sesame oil; 1/2 c green or red bell pepper, cut into strips; 1/4 medium onion, cut lengthwise into strips; 1/2 tsp red pepper flakes

    2. 1 Tbsp hoisin sauce; 2 tsp sesame oil; 1/3 c matchstick carrots; 1/3 c chopped celery; 1 green onion, sliced; 2 Tbsp chopped, unsalted peanuts

    3. 1 Tbsp reduced-sodium soy sauce; 2 tsp sesame oil; 1/2 c asparagus tips; 2 Tbsp chopped, unsalted cashews

    4. 1 Tbsp reduced-sodium soy sauce; 1 Tbsp lemon juice; 1 tsp lemon zest; 1 tsp honey; 1 clove garlic, crushed; 1/2 c snow peas; 1 c chopped celery

    5. 1 whisked egg; 1/2 c (or more) chopped broccoli; 1/4 medium onion, cut lengthwise into strips; 1/2 tsp red pepper flakes; 1 Tbsp reduced-sodium soy sauce

    6. 1 whisked egg; 1/2 c snow peas; 1/2 c green or red bell pepper, cut into strips; 1/4 onion, cut lengthwise into strips; 1 Tbsp hoisin sauce


    BAKING

    Basic technique:
    Preheat the oven to 350°F and bake the chicken breast for 20 to 25 minutes, or until an internal roasting thermometer reaches 170°. Don't overcook it. Err on the side of tenderness. An overcooked, dried-out chicken breast won't give you salmonella, but you probably won't want to eat it in the first place.
    Tip: Quickly searing the breast in a hot skillet will help avoid dryness because it locks in the bird's juices.

    Sauced
    Watery ready-made sauces like salsa will bake fine—some of the liquid will boil away as the chicken bakes. But thicker sauces, like barbecue or ranch, need water or broth mixed in, otherwise you'll be left with a sticky, blackened char.

    Tip: Use a small baking dish to keep the meat covered with sauce.

    7. 1/3 c salsa

    8. 2 Tbsp jalapeño cheese dip, 2 Tbsp salsa, 1 Tbsp water

    9. 2 Tbsp marinara sauce, 2 Tbsp water

    10. 2 Tbsp barbecue sauce, 2 Tbsp water

    11. 2 Tbsp ranch dressing, 2 Tbsp water

    12. 2 Tbsp Dijon mustard, 2 Tbsp honey, 1 tsp olive oil

    13. 3 Tbsp chicken broth; 1 Tbsp mustard; 1 clove garlic, crushed

    14. 2 Tbsp condensed mushroom soup, 2 Tbsp water

    15. 2 Tbsp pesto, 2 Tbsp reduced-sodium chicken broth

    16. 2 Tbsp reduced-sodium soy sauce, 1/4 c crushed pineapple with juice

    17. 3 Tbsp chicken broth, 2 Tbsp light coconut milk, 1/4 tsp curry powder

    18. 1/3 c chicken broth, 1 Tbsp maple syrup, 1 Tbsp apple juice

    19. 3 Tbsp red wine vinegar; 1 Tbsp barbecue sauce; 1 clove garlic, crushed

    20. 2 Tbsp hot sauce, 2 Tbsp Worcestershire sauce, 1/4 tsp chili powder

    21. 2 Tbsp lemon juice, 2 Tbsp orange marmalade, 1/4 tsp rosemary

    Rubbed
    Rub one of the following spice mixtures evenly over each breast, then hit the chicken with a shot or two of cooking spray (not too much, though) to hold the rub in place and help form a light crust when cooking.

    22. Tex-Mex style: 1/4 tsp each garlic powder, chili powder, black pepper, and oregano; pinch of salt

    23. Southwestern: 1/4 tsp each black pepper, chili powder, red pepper flakes, cumin, and hot sauce

    24. French: 1/4 tsp each dried basil, rosemary, and thyme; pinch of salt and pepper

    Crusted
    A whisked egg acts like glue, holding the crust to the meat. It also gives your poultry a small protein boost. Crack one open in a shallow bowl, whisk it, and dip the chicken in it. Tip: Put your crust ingredients in a shallow plate instead of a bowl—it'll be much easier to coat the breast evenly.

    25. Nut crusted: Dip the chicken in the egg, then roll it in 1/3 c nuts of your choice, finely chopped. Spray lightly with cooking spray.

    26. Parmesan crusted: Dip the chicken in the egg, then roll it in a mixture of 1 Tbsp finely grated Parmesan cheese, 1 Tbsp Italian bread crumbs, and a pinch of black pepper.

    27. "Like fried": Dip the chicken in the egg, then roll it in 1/2 c crushed cornflakes or bran flakes. Spray lightly with cooking spray.

    Stuffed
    Relax, this isn't hard. First, pound the heck out of the chicken breast with a meat tenderizer or the heel of your hand—you want it to be uniformly thin. (Just be careful not to tear it.) Then, arrange your ingredients on the breast, roll it up, and secure it with toothpicks or kitchen twine so it doesn't come undone while it's baking.

    28. 1 slice Cheddar cheese, 2 slices deli ham, 1/4 tsp black pepper

    29. 1 slice mozzarella cheese; 3 slices pepperoni; 3 leaves fresh basil, chopped

    30. 1 slice mozzarella; 1/4 c chopped tomatoes; 3 leaves fresh basil, chopped

    31. 1 small handful baby spinach leaves, chopped; 1 Tbsp blue-cheese crumbles; 1 clove garlic, crushed

    32. 1 slice mozzarella, 1 slice salami, 1 Tbsp chopped roasted red pepper

    33. 1 1/2 Tbsp part-skim ricotta cheese, 1 Tbsp chopped sun-dried tomatoes, 1/4 tsp oregano

    34. 1 1/2 Tbsp part-skim ricotta cheese, 1 Tbsp diced olives, 1/4 tsp lemon zest

    35. 1 Tbsp pesto, 1 Tbsp shredded Parmesan cheese, 1/4 tsp black pepper

    GRILLING, SEARING, OR GEORGE FOREMAN-ING

    Basic technique: Heat the grill, place a nonstick skillet over medium-high heat on the stove until it's hot, or power up the Foreman. Add the marinated chicken, cooking 3 to 5 minutes per side (6 to 8 total on the Foreman), or until an internal roasting thermometer reaches 170°F. The chicken doesn't stop cooking when you take it off the heat. If it's still hot, it's still cooking.


    Marinades
    Marinades need only about an hour or so to penetrate the meat. Whether you're cooking one chicken breast at a time or four at once, just mix the marinade ingredients well in a resealable plastic bag, drop in the chicken, seal, shake, and refrigerate.

    Tip: If you're grilling, make a little extra marinade and reserve it in a separate bag or bowl. Brush it on the chicken during cooking to keep the meat moist.

    36. 2 Tbsp bourbon, 1 tsp deli-style mustard, 1/4 tsp black pepper

    37. 2 Tbsp bourbon; 1 tsp honey; 1 clove garlic, crushed

    38. 2 Tbsp white wine; 1 clove garlic, crushed; 1/4 tsp thyme

    39. 2 Tbsp red wine; 1 tsp barbecue sauce; 1 clove garlic, crushed

    40. 2 Tbsp Coca-Cola, 1/4
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 02, 2009 12:25 AM GMT
    Ok, Men!

    I went to the store, and got some food.

    Chicken Breasts
    Chicken Tenderloins
    Sandwich Meat
    Whole Wheat Bread
    Carrots
    Green Beans
    Sweet Snow Peas
    Black Beans
    Salsa
    Cheese
    Strawberries
    Raspberries
    Blueberries
    Rice (white and brown)
    Oatmeal (kaski)
    Apple Cinn Garnola Cereal
    Mini Wheats Kaski Cereal
    Beef
    Tuna
    Milk

    I have some ideas, for chicken, but if you see anything else that I can make for breakfast, mid day snacks, things like that, Please Let Me Know.

    Thanks
    Dustin