How to live to 100

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 05, 2009 2:41 PM GMT
    By Dr. Maoshing Ni - Posted on Tue, Sep 29, 2009, 3:29 pm PDT

    People often ask me if it is actually possible to live to age 100, especially if they had bad habits in the past. I always answer that while aging is inevitable, poor health is not. Read on to find the most effective ways to live to 100.

    It really is possible to live to 100.
    The good news is that your body was designed to be 100 — but, you have to get out of the way. Getting out of the way means taking an honest look at the habits and lifestyle you are living with today. Most of us have developed habits that limit our true health potential. But don't let these bad habits of the past discourage you. What matters is what you do from this moment forward. Leave behind the habits that aren't serving you — smoking, eating fast food, and so on — and start choosing habits that your body needs to thrive.

    Lifestyle habits that age you most quickly
    The culprits that will most quickly age you and negatively affect your health are:

    1. Poor diet
    2. Lack of exercise
    3. Stress and worry
    4. Exhaustion
    5. Unhappiness
    6. Lack of love
    7. Toxic overload
    8. Blockages and congestion of the transportation highways within our bodies.

    Healthy habits to live long
    It takes 14 to 21 days of repetitive behavior to form a new pattern in your brain. Once the pattern is formed, it becomes an automatic behavioral response. As you develop new healthy habits, they will begin to replace bad habits. Here are some of the most transformative longevity habits:

    1. Drink more water
    Drink 8 glasses of fresh, filtered water every day. Water is very important for proper lymphatic drainage and hydrating the cells to prevent buildup of toxic waste products. Your safest bet is filtered water. The best kind of filtration processes for removing contaminants use activated charcoal, which removes the impurities but leaves the water-soluble minerals. Avoid water softeners, which take away essential minerals. To learn about a high-performance filtration system that I recommend, click here.

    2. Eat like a centenarian
    The rural community of Rugao, four hours north of Shanghai, enjoys the reputation as the "longevity county of China" because there are over 200 centenarians in the small region -- the highest number per 1,000 residents anywhere in China. Rugao residents eat mostly fish, vegetables, mushrooms, seaweed, corn and buckwheat. There was virtually no meat or poultry present in the majority of their diet. Scientists have confirmed the health benefits of a diet high in fish and vegetables and low in animal products.

    Know what foods to enjoy and what to avoid:

    • The very best thing you can do for your health is to eat a wide array of colorful fruits and vegetables every day.

    • Eat fish and cut back on meat and poultry.

    • Choose the right fats. Cut back on saturated fats like butter and avoid all trans fats. Instead, choose mono-saturated fats: olive, sesame, canola, flax, and fish oils.

    • Avoid all refined sugars.

    3. Restore with regular rest
    Get 7 to 8 hours of quality sleep every night.

    4. Take the stairs!
    Take a walk. Go for a swim. Join the gym. Find an exercise activity that works for you and stick to it, practicing at least four times a week for thirty minutes a session. Regular exercise can strengthen your immune system, uplift your mood, maintain joint mobility, increase energy - the list goes on and on!

    5. Manage your stress.
    Stress is the root cause of most of the diseases that shorten our life span. Meditation is a powerful way to manage your stress level. For the best results, meditate every day. Start with five minutes and work your way up to fifteen or twenty minutes. (See 3 Easy Beginner Mediation Techniques.) For a guided CD that is filled with meditations for living to 100, click here. Another option? Get your exercise and stress-management all in one by beginning a tai chi practice.

    6. Detoxify your surroundings.
    With environmental factors causing ever more damage to our well-being, it is important to know what to look out for and avoid. For starters, you can avoid many dangerous chemical compounds if you buy organic foods and use glass and recycled paper products. In addition, it is beneficial to undergo periodic detoxification treatments with special dietary and herbal regimens to lower your body's toxic load. An herbal blend that is specially formulated for helping your body detoxify is Internal Cleanse. Also learn how to eliminate the toxins with this 5-Step Detox to Revitalize You.

    I hope you found the answers to get you started on your own longevity quest! I invite you to visit often and share your own personal health and longevity tips with me.

    May you live long, live strong, and live happy!

    -Dr. Mao

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 05, 2009 4:07 PM GMT
    theantijock saidWhat's 100 in gay years?

    25
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 05, 2009 4:20 PM GMT
    theantijock saidNot what I had in mind but very funny.


    Or sad?
  • DrewT

    Posts: 1327

    Oct 05, 2009 6:56 PM GMT
    Pinny said
    theantijock saidWhat's 100 in gay years?

    25


    Yup. Sounds about right!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 05, 2009 7:23 PM GMT

    Yer right, I need more love in my life.
    Anyone want to help me out? icon_surprised.gif

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 05, 2009 7:27 PM GMT
    It has a lot to do with genetics.

    Centenarians are pretty common in my family, no matter if they were bible thumpers or sat on a barstool for 40 years.

    Personally, I'm not looking forward to it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 05, 2009 7:34 PM GMT
    "The good news is that your body was designed to be 100..."

    what?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 05, 2009 8:01 PM GMT
    Tapper said"The good news is that your body was designed to be 100..."

    what?


    When Jesus made us he had 100 as the expiry date.
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19129

    Oct 05, 2009 8:11 PM GMT
    I kind of think I'll be bored with this life on EARTH thing by about 95 icon_rolleyes.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 05, 2009 8:26 PM GMT
    I want to have a happy life, whether it be 100 years long or only 40. As long as I'm living to my fullest potential and actually *enjoying* myself, then so be it. It reminds me of this quote:

    Why tiptoe through life only to arrive at death safely? I want to arrive at death, sliding sideways, body all used up and having a ball!

    Amen! I'm all for being healthy, but living off of only rice, veggies, fish and water so that I can see 100 laps around the sun doesn't sound like a very fulfilling life to me. Yes, the body is a temple and it should be respected, but throwing a party and trashing the place a little now and then can be so satisfying! icon_smile.gif
  • swimbikerun

    Posts: 2835

    Oct 05, 2009 8:54 PM GMT
    C'mon guys: 100 is the new 90!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 05, 2009 8:57 PM GMT
    swimbikerun saidC'mon guys: 100 is the new 90!


    Ah, shit! It's not the new pink? I gotta go change my clothes again. jeezuz h!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 05, 2009 9:34 PM GMT
    Uh, this is just an advertisement for Dr. Mao's detox BS.

    It doesn't take a genius to figure out the method to live to 100, if that is the goal and if you have the genes that will allow it. Each organ in our body decays at a different rate, so you may be 100 with very poor sight and hearing but an excellent liver (for example).

    If you really really intend to live to 100, your finances will be as important as your health. You might run out of money if you retire at 65 instead of 75 or 80. No problem working that long because you're such a health guy to start with, right?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 05, 2009 10:10 PM GMT
    I think the best way to live to be 100 or more is to find something new to bitch about every day. Keeps the mind active and you have something new to look forward to every morning.
  • dannyboy1101

    Posts: 977

    Oct 05, 2009 10:55 PM GMT
    I don't want to live to a hundred. Just cuz you're alive doesn't mean that you're well. Anyone want to be 105 with Alzheimer's? 102 but unable to drive or even walk? No thanks!

    And I'm sorry but I will eat meat until the day I die. I'm not going to try and eat like a rabbit for 80 more years.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 06, 2009 5:57 AM GMT
    If you want to live to 103, watch this video and don't be a fool

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 06, 2009 6:35 AM GMT
    icon_eek.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 06, 2009 6:40 AM GMT
    I think G_Force meant to post this in a positive light, and thank you for that!

    still, i dread the day i get "old"..icon_sad.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 06, 2009 6:48 AM GMT
    If 25 is 100 in straight years.
    Is our mid-life crisis later on in just before 20?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 06, 2009 7:30 AM GMT
    Damn, would you guys please look at the quality of life of those 100 year olds. It sucks. Quality over quanity evertime for me.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 06, 2009 2:12 PM GMT
    Alpha13 saidDamn, would you guys please look at the quality of life of those 100 year olds. It sucks. Quality over quanity evertime for me.


    I think that makes it all downhill after 45 or so.

    And maybe you just don't expect the same life that you do when you're that age than you do when you're 30, so it's relative.