Getting over exercised enduced asthma

  • Artesin

    Posts: 482

    Dec 14, 2007 7:52 AM GMT
    About 7 years ago I came down with bronchitis which coupled with harvesting allergies and left me with an exercise enduced asthma. The overall affect of it has nearly gone, even when I had it I only used an inhaler for a maximum of two months, but a few annoying tendencies still remain. For instance when I run continuously it feels as if I can't recover my breath during and after. It takes me slightly longer than average to recover after I have been running and I do have a slight weeze that isn;t even audible. Are there any cardio plans that can help to get rid of this completely?
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    Dec 14, 2007 8:36 PM GMT
    Interval training with cardio might be better for you; also, sustained cardio work at a moderate pace would also work. Good luck!
  • auryn

    Posts: 2061

    Dec 14, 2007 11:26 PM GMT
    I found this... hopefully it will help some. If you can get to a MD and find some info, post it. This is the first time I've heard of it.

    http://www.asthma-any-question.com/exercise-induced-asthma.html
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 16, 2007 4:28 AM GMT
    I had this same exact problem, only my asthma lasted through college and was triggered by things such as cigarrette smoke and other irritants.

    I haven't used an inhaler in several years so I think one outgrows it. But I always make it a point to jog for at least 20 minutes before doing a hard work out in cold weather.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Dec 16, 2007 2:17 PM GMT
    I had bronchitus in 1994 used lobelia in small then moderate amounts for 6 months in dry capsule form, and I have never had it since. A Dr. told me I would need an inhaler for the rest of my life. I did many biatholons since then. Do not take this if you smoke!! Eventhough it was once used to help people quit smoking.

    ***Make sure you get advice from an MD on dosing, it can be toxic in larger amounts.***

    Good Luck. mike3

    Uses of this Herb
    Asthma
    Bronchitis
    Cough

    Drugs that Interact
    Summary

    Learn More About
    Herbal medicine

    Lobelia
    Also listed as: Asthma weed; Bladderpod; Gagroot; Indian tobacco; Lobelia inflata; Pukeweed; Vomitroot

    Overview
    Plant Description
    Parts Used
    Medicinal Uses and Indications
    Available Forms
    How to Take It
    Precautions
    Possible Interactions
    Supporting Research


    Overview
    Lobelia ( Lobelia inflata ), also called Indian tobacco, has a long history of use as an herbal remedy for respiratory conditions such as asthma, bronchitis, pneumonia, and cough. Native Americans historically have smoked lobelia as a treatment for asthma. In the 19th century, American physicians prescribed lobelia to induce vomiting in order remove toxins from the body. Because of this, it earned the name "puke weed." Today, lobelia is considered effective in helping clear mucus from the respiratory tract, including the throat, lungs, and bronchial tubes. Although few studies have thoroughly evaluated the safety and effectiveness of lobelia, some herbalists today incorporate lobelia into a comprehensive treatment plan for asthma.

    An active ingredient in the lobelia plant, lobeline, is similar to nicotine in its effect on the body. Like nicotine, it stimulates nerves in the central nervous system. For this reason, lobeline was once used as a nicotine substitute in many anti-smoking products and preparations designed to break the smoking habit. In 1993, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) prohibited the sale of lobeline-containing smoking products. The FDA reported that such products lacked effectiveness in helping people quit or reduce smoking.

    It is important to note that lobelia is a potentially toxic herb. Lobelia can be safely used in very small doses (particularly homeopathic doses), but moderate-to-large doses can cause serious adverse effects ranging from dry mouth and nausea to convulsions and even coma (see Precautions). Under the guidance of a qualified health care provider, however, lobelia, in combination with other herbs that affect the respiratory system, is considered relatively safe.



    Plant Description
    Lobelia is an attractive annual or sometimes biennial (replanted every year or two) herb that grows to a height of three feet. Its erect, hairy stem is angular, branching at the top, usually green with a tinge of violet. The pale green or yellowish leaves have a sharp taste and a slightly irritating odor. The sparse flowers are pale violet-blue outside and pale yellow inside.



    Parts Used
    The above-ground portions of the lobelia plant (namely the leaves and seeds) are used for medicinal purposes.



    Medicinal Uses and Indications
    Lobelia has not been well studied in animals or people. However, a qualified health care provider may recommend this herb (usually in combination with other herbs) for the treatment of the following respiratory problems:

    Asthma
    Bronchitis
    Cough
    Lobelia is also diluted to a homeopathic dose and used alone or in combination with other products for smoking cessation, muscle relaxation, nausea, vomiting, and various respiratory illnesses.



    Available Forms
    Lobelia is available in liquid extracts, tinctures, and as a dried herb in capsules and for teas.



    How to Take It
    Therapy should begin with lower dosages and increase gradually, depending upon response.

    Pediatric

    Adjust the recommended adult dose to account for the child's weight. Most herbal dosages for adults are calculated on the basis of a 150 lb (70 kg) adult. Therefore, if the child weighs 50 lb (20 - 25 kg), the appropriate dose of lobelia for this child would be 1/3 of the adult dosage.

    Adult

    The following are recommended adult doses:

    Dried herb (infusion or decoction): ¼ - ½ tsp herb in 8 oz of water, preferably mixed with other herbs. Steep 30 - 40 minutes and take 2 oz (60 mL), 4 times daily. (This method is not preferred because of lobelia's acrid taste.)
    Liquid extract (1:1 in 50 % alcohol): 0.2 - 0.6 mL (4 - 18 drops), 3 times daily
    Tincture of lobelia: 0.6 - 2.0 mL (18 - 60 drops) daily
    Vinegar tincture of lobelia (1:5 in dilute acetic acid): 1 - 4 mL (20 - 120 drops), 3 times daily


    Precautions
    The use of herbs is a time-honored approach to strengthening the body and treating disease. Herbs, however, contain substances that can trigger side effects and interact with other herbs, supplements, or medications. For these reasons, herbs should be taken with care, under the supervision a health care provider.

    Lobelia is considered a potentially toxic herb. Active substances in lobelia bind to nicotine receptors in the nervous system and can cause serious symptoms, such as profuse sweating, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, tremors, rapid heartbeat, mental confusion, convulsions, hypothermia, coma, and even death. You should not exceed a total daily dosage of 20 mg lobelia. Doses higher than 500 mg are highly toxic and could be fatal.

    People with high blood pressure, heart disease, tobacco sensitivity, paralysis, seizure disorder, and shortness of breath, and those recovering from shock should not take lobelia. Pregnant and breast-feeding women should also avoid this herb.



    Possible Interactions
    There are no known scientific reports of interactions between lobelia and medications. However, based on some of the chemicals contained in lobelia, use caution with the following medications:

    Psychiatric medications, including anti-depressants, anti-anxiety agents, and stimulants


    Supporting Research
    Bradley P, ed. British Herbal Compendium . Vol. I. Dorset (Great Britain): British Herbal Medicine Association; 1992: 149-150.

    Brinker F. Herb Contraindications and Drug Interactions . 2nd ed. Sandy, OR: Eclectic Medical Publications; 1998:93-94.

    Davison GC, Rosen RC. Lobeline and reduction of cigarette smoking. Psychol Rep . 1972;31:443-56.

    Dwoskin LP, Crooks PA. A novel mechanism of action and potential use for lobeline as a treatment for psychostimulant abuse. Biochem Pharmacol . 2002;63(2):89-98.

    Gruenwald J, Brendler T, Christof J. PDR for Herbal Medicines . 2nd ed. Montvale, NJ: Medical Economics Company; 2000: 479-480.

    Karch SB. The Consumer's Guide to Herbal Medicine . Hauppauge, New York: Advanced Research Press; 1999:127-128.

    Lim DY, Kim YS, Miwa S. Influence of lobeline on catecholamine release from the isolated perfused rat adrenal gland. Auton Neurosci . 2004;110(1):27-35.

    Mazur LJ, De Ybarrondo L, Miller J, Colasurdo G. Use of alternative and complementary therapies for pediatric asthma. Tex Med . 2001;97(6):64-68.

    Newall C, Anderson L, Phillipson J. Herbal Medicines: A Guide for Health-care Professionals . London: Pharmaceutical Press; 1996: 187.

    Rotblatt M, Ziment I. Evidence-Based Herbal Medicine . Philadelphia, PA: Hanley & Belfus, Inc; 2002:259-261.

    Stead LF, Hughes JR. Lobeline for smoking cessation (Cochrane Review). In: The Cochrane Library , 1, 2002. Oxford: Update Software.

    Subarnas A, Tadano T, Oshima Y, Kisara K, Ohizumi Y. Pharmacological properties of beta-amyrin palmitate, a novel centrally acting compound, isolated from Lobelia inflata leaves. J Pharm Pharmacol . 1993; 45(ISS 6):545-550.

    Subarnas A, Tadano T, Nakahata N, et al., A possible mechanism of antidepressant activity of beta-amyrin palmitate isolated from Lobelia inflata leaves in the forced swimming test. Life Sci . 1993;52(3):289-96.

    Subarnas A, Oshima Y, Sidik,