...and the conversation turned to 1957 and the stereo I got then in kindergarten which was a portable, but as big as the 57 Mercury Montclair that brought it home from the shop.

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    Oct 13, 2009 1:59 AM GMT
    The link I've posted here is someone else's copy of the same record that was my very first. It is a rare S T E R E O test record that I just searched for in case I could find a CD version. This vid is of the record, multi-coloured, on a turntable! Wear your headphones for the best result. It's a hoot! And it made me very, very happy to enjoy it again.

    I hope this audio trip down memory lane makes you smile as it has made me. Now, I have to see if I still have my original stuck in the garage some place.

    Thanks, for joining me, 'here in your own home'. icon_biggrin.gif

    Bel Canto Stereo Demonstration from Terrance Tucker on Vimeo.



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    Oct 13, 2009 2:02 AM GMT
    pretty cool.....thanks for sharing icon_biggrin.gif
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    Oct 13, 2009 2:09 AM GMT

    My first record player was this big hunk of plastic red and white and I use to play this all the time (see below)

    [url][/url]

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    Oct 13, 2009 2:37 AM GMT
    Guilty pleasures, all...icon_redface.gif
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    Oct 13, 2009 3:17 AM GMT
    after reading the title of this thread i was expecting something more akin to gertrude stein. but my record player had a function where it could change and/or flip records... my mom put a collection of muppet show songs on each night to help me fall asleep, and the the second vinyl was always abbey road by the beatles.
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    Oct 13, 2009 3:31 AM GMT
    Gertrude should be so lucky to have had a stereo in 1957...LOL! Like that idea of a turntable that actually flipped the discs...autoreverse of sorts!icon_cool.gif
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Oct 13, 2009 4:02 AM GMT
    Hillie,
    That was quite wonderful.
    Phil Harris singing, if I'm not mistaken...
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    Oct 13, 2009 4:04 AM GMT
    ...and Phil Harris was married to what blonde actress/singer?icon_question.gif
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    Oct 13, 2009 2:55 PM GMT
    BiGymGuy said...and Phil Harris was married to what blonde actress/singer?icon_question.gif


    Alice Faye!

    harrisfaye2.jpg


    And here is your 1957 Mercury Montclair...........

    1957MercuryMontclairSeries.jpg
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    Oct 14, 2009 4:10 AM GMT
    R I G H T you are! LOL! icon_razz.gif
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    Oct 14, 2009 5:15 AM GMT
    Hmm... now I'm not quite sure whatever happened to the big Marantz stereo console. Dad kept it around for years after it died, because of the beautiful cherrywood cabinet. When I was a kid, I used to love carrying the tubes down to the store to run them through the tube tester.

    I'm guessing that he eventually threw it on the burning pile.
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    Oct 14, 2009 12:11 PM GMT
    Dang shame...Fisher and Marantz both did high end consoles, and of course, Grundig, but their Euro finish wood did take some getting used to. It was becoming the age of components and it did give them a bridge between the two. icon_sad.gif
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    Oct 14, 2009 1:09 PM GMT
    I remember my folk's stereo very fondly from 1978.

    Big ol' 8-track cassette deck attached externally...
    The record player used to make these weird noises as it shut off...
    It had these crazy dials that looked like a pair of owl eyes looking at me....



    ...but the music it made was wonderful.
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    Oct 14, 2009 1:36 PM GMT
    My grandparents had an absolutely beautiful pecan wood Packard Bell stereo - with the most amazing sound. When nobody else was home - I turned it up - and it sounded like a band was in the house. It had beautiful carved doors that slid inward to uncover the speakers at each end. The speakers were covered in brocade material. Inside - which you approached by lifting a lid - was the AM/FM radio, record player, and built-in 8 track tape player. The piece sat in the living room - was about six feet wide, stood about 3 feet tall - and was just beautiful. I'd like to have it back - really. The sound was comparable to the best of the best sound systems today - - - and this unit was built in 1966!

    It resembled this:
    magnavox2.jpg
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    Oct 14, 2009 1:44 PM GMT
    You boys need to google those beauties. If I can find my first stereo lp, you should certainly be able to find pics of the consoles! Start with the brand and year, etc. Good luck! Would love to see them...especially those owl's eyes.icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Oct 15, 2009 12:06 AM GMT
    This is the closest I could find. It wasn't this style, but something makes me think the cabinet may have been made by the same outfit.
    0321132_20.jpeg
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    Oct 15, 2009 12:18 AM GMT
    Gold brocade and French Provincial; you boys rock! icon_biggrin.gif
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    Oct 15, 2009 12:25 AM GMT
    BiGymGuy saidThe link I've posted here is someone else's copy of the same record that was my very first. It is a rare S T E R E O test record that I just searched for in case I could find a CD version. This vid is of the record, multi-coloured, on a turntable! Wear your headphones for the best result. It's a hoot! And it made me very, very happy to enjoy it again.

    I hope this audio trip down memory lane makes you smile as it has made me. Now, I have to see if I still have my original stuck in the garage some place.

    Thanks, for joining me, 'here in your own home'. icon_biggrin.gif

    Bel Canto Stereo Demonstration from Terrance Tucker on Vimeo.





    OK, here's the delivery truck that brought the stereo home..."room for 3 big men, front or rear", Ed said!

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    Oct 15, 2009 12:38 AM GMT
    My mother considered a Mercury Montclair for her new car in 1957, perhaps because that's the name of the town where we lived in Northern New Jersey, just outside New York City. Among some of the Mercury's interesting features was a push-button automatic transmission in the steering wheel hub, and a reverse-slanting rear window that electrically retracted into the trunk. I must say that rear window really impressed me, and the salesman definitely had ME sold! LOL!

    But she finally decided on a Chrysler Imperial, an even more outrageous car, with huge fins and a classic example of US 1950s-era chrome excess. An amazing imitation of a spaceship with its crazy taillights, I featured that car in a short story I wrote about my 1950s boys summer camps, that some of you here have read.
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    Oct 15, 2009 12:44 AM GMT
    R.V.

    Our 57 was red and cream with the turnpike edition ENGINE. Our car had the quad headlights, obviously an add on to a slim fender and my father added fender skirts, huge ones that were stolen in 1 week. Ours did not have the drop window in the back, however, since it was only the full Turnpike Edition that had all the goodies. Ours did include the push button transmission.icon_cool.gif
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    Oct 15, 2009 1:00 AM GMT
    BiGymGuy saidR.V.

    Our 57 was red and cream with the turnpike edition ENGINE. Our car had the quad headlights, obviously an add on to a slim fender and my father added fender skirts, huge ones that were stolen in 1 week. Ours did not have the drop window in the back, however, since it was the full Turnpike Edition that had all the goodies. Ours did include the push button transmission.icon_cool.gif

    Here's some web pics of the 1957 Imperial, none of them ours. My mother's was a 2-door hardtop, in 2-tone coral & white. I included a 4-door coral pic to show that incredible 1950s color, very Floridian, though we lived in New Jersey.

    2788241829_c35d2de645.jpg

    1957-1959-imperial-9.jpg

    1957-imperial.jpg

    Image017.jpg
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    Oct 15, 2009 1:15 AM GMT
    Yeah, my great grandparents had the chrysler with that weird pepto-bismol color. My other grandparents had the edsel with the push-button transmission in the steering wheel. (Dad had a Dart with pushbutton transmission that looked more like an extra radio.)

    The last time I saw it, the push-buttons had been bypassed and there was a piece of steel rod sticking through the floor to operate the transmission.
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    Oct 15, 2009 1:25 AM GMT
    That pink color of the 50s had a note of grey in it that made it muted and really a hot color without being too pink. Remember on the 55 T-bird.

    Here's a pic of my old stereo that the Merc brought home. The pic shows black gator as the case covering. Mine was rattan.icon_cool.gif
    http://estoreoutwest.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=2610

    Click on the image to enlarge.
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    Oct 15, 2009 1:33 AM GMT
    Heh... those were the kind we had at school.

    And speaking of (well... picturing) white-walls: I have to buy new tires for my Mom's mini-van this month. Where on earth did Dad find white-walls for a mini van? I'll probably buy something normal, but it does make it easy to pick out from the herd in the costco parking lot.
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    Oct 15, 2009 1:38 AM GMT
    BiGymGuy saidDang shame...Fisher and Marantz both did high end consoles, and of course, Grundig, but their Euro finish wood did take some getting used to. It was becoming the age of components and it did give them a bridge between the two. icon_sad.gif

    OMG, some of our family friends had Grundig Majestics, incredible radios, almost magical to view their dials, with their unique linear frequency controls, with little icons to represent different musical instruments. And compared to other radios of the period, I found their sound wonderful.

    My parents were slow to accept stereo, though some relatives had those huge 7-foot consoles back in the late '50s, and I always wished we could, too. My parents finally bought me a stereo record player around 1963, and I promptly wore out an LP of the original "Funny Girl" Broadway cast with Barbra Streisand, and one of pianist Robert Browning playing the Samuel Barber piano concerto.

    A year earlier, in 1962, my father suddenly took me shopping for my own bedroom TV, which overwhelmed me, a luxury few of my friends had then. Just black & white, and only a 16" screen, I was nevertheless almost unable to believe I was given such a gift.

    Around 1960 I had gotten my first transistor "pocket" radio, a Zenith, and it seemed so hi-tech back then to have this "tiny" radio that you could actually fit into a (rather large) pocket. In 1965 I bought my own Zenith radio, a Trans Oceanic 3000 for its shortwave capabilities, for something around $200, a good amount in those days. It let me listen to broadcasts all over the world, and I began to teach myself foreign languages thanks to it.

    And today my partner & I have an iPhone and another cell phone, and a couple of new Macs on broadband, all connected to our home wireless network, along with a wireless printer/fax/scanner/copier. And satellite HDTV, and Bluetooth cell in our car, and I could go on.

    You think I haven't seen the whole world change? Hell, I used to have to wait a minute when I turned on a TV, or a radio, for the tubes inside to warm up before I could see or hear anything. And both my parents were born when commercial radio didn't even exist, and all 4 of my grandparents were born in the 1800s, when nothing but telegraph & rudimentary phones existed.

    And I saw those grandparents, and my late parents, adjust to the incredible changes that happened during their lives, and I try to keep pace with the things happening to me.

    So that one of my personal mottos is: I refuse to concede technology to children. LOL!