Deepest Space: This should make you feel really insignificant

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    Oct 14, 2009 9:51 AM GMT


    I almost cried after watching this. So much information out there that you'll never come close to understanding the beginnings of in your lifetime.
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    Oct 14, 2009 9:56 AM GMT
    kool...icon_biggrin.gif
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    Oct 14, 2009 1:36 PM GMT


    WOW!
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    Oct 14, 2009 1:41 PM GMT
    so humbling...


    I don't feel "insiginficant" having seen that, but humbled.
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    Oct 14, 2009 2:08 PM GMT
    Inspirational
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    Oct 14, 2009 2:13 PM GMT
    And the universe still revolves around me.
  • Spacerik

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    Oct 14, 2009 2:16 PM GMT
    Here's hoping i'd still be around when we start venturing into deep space discovering other life forms.

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    Oct 14, 2009 2:24 PM GMT
    It's stuff like this that makes you 'think big' and start to question so much about life and belief, purpose and time. Faced with such expansive context as this, you can see why people flee intellectually into rigid, yet safe, extremes.
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    Oct 14, 2009 3:24 PM GMT
    It doesn't make me feel insignificant at all. Everyday faith and mythology is enough to make me already feel mildly insignificant. Each day I come more and more to terms with the fact that I am mortal, that I am dying, and that eventually I will be dead. I no longer believe in a heaven, or an after life. Concepts of energy being neither created nor destroyed no longer bring me solace on account of that electrical system of my body may just as well become expanded as heat and entropy.

    But this, this is different. There is something about it that I actually find uplifting. To know that all is not certain, and there is still so much to be learned.

    Perhaps it is somewhat depressing to know that I will never see those discoveries, much like the many discoveries I know to be made some day, from the first extra terrestrial, to the ability to grow a child outside of the womb, the fusing of man and machine and perhaps the first few steps towards human immortality.

    But it is times like these when perhaps our greatest and most under rated achievement comes in handy. The ability to write, record, and thus continue to socially and technologically evolve as a species building off of the accomplishments of the past, those ones that we would probably never discover ourselves had someone not recorded their findings.

    And in that same way, we pass down our DNA, and our offspring live the lives and experience the amazingly mundane truths of the new world for us.

    Yes, very very uplifting and perhaps brings our own simple lives into much greater context. We are no longer individuals, when we all interconnected we took the first few steps towards becomming one. Despite our differing beliefs, in many ways we all want the same thing. This collective concious will get us there, if we allow our DNA to thrive, our genes will be part of that experience.
  • Sparkycat

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    Oct 14, 2009 3:30 PM GMT
    I already feel insignificant.
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    Oct 14, 2009 3:32 PM GMT
    "You may see beyond yourself where you may find peace of mind is waiting there. Then the day will come when you'll see we're all one and life flows on within you and without you." - George Harrison (The Inner Light)

    For some reason i thought of this quote while watching the video.
  • EricLA

    Posts: 3461

    Oct 14, 2009 4:49 PM GMT
    The Nova episode airing this week on the most recent repair mission to Hubble really drew me in. Usually I'm multi-tasking and websurfing while watching TV, but I put my computer down. It might not have been a suspense thriller, but I was still captivated. In the opening they cover some of Hubble's major discoveries: before Hubble we didn't know the size or age of the universe. Now we do. Before Hubble we'd never seen evidence of black holes. Now we know they're all over. Before Hubble we'd never seen evidence of planets outside of our solar system. Now we have. And then there are the pictures that almost defy imagination.

    I remember when Spacelab burned up years and years ago. I felt a tug in my heart when it burned up. But I feel more of a connection to Hubble because all it's given us.
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    Oct 14, 2009 4:53 PM GMT
    Once again proving that the Cosmos is wonderous

    And we really don't know
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    Oct 14, 2009 5:25 PM GMT
    Life presented in it's most grandest of scales, maginfied for all to see. magnificent I tell you!
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    Oct 14, 2009 6:17 PM GMT
    Thank you jakebenson for sharing that clip. It was awesome and very moving. There is so much out there that we do not know and need to know to understand our universe.
  • DanielQQ

    Posts: 365

    Oct 14, 2009 7:04 PM GMT
    Loved the clip.. the music was awesome. Doesn't make me feel insignificant at all, though, just like a really rich person doesn't make me feel poor. Sure, i suppose taken as a whole our lives are insignificant to the order of the universe, but relative to my perspective, my life is... well, my life. It's likely the only chance I'll have to experience the world. To me, it's the most significant thing in the universe.
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    Oct 14, 2009 7:39 PM GMT
    Anyone know what the resolution of the Hubble CCD is?
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    Oct 14, 2009 7:59 PM GMT
    Sparkycat saidI already feel insignificant.


    icon_sad.gif You shouldn't.
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    Oct 14, 2009 8:32 PM GMT
    Insignificant? No for I already knew there were more Galaxies than the human eye could possible see. When they find an intergalactic race then i'll feel insignificant maybeicon_lol.gif
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    Oct 14, 2009 8:50 PM GMT
    great video, man. It actually makes me feel extremely significant. I'm here. I'm alive. I exist. It's an amazing experience just to be and witness the day. There's a purpose for it and my journey is in finding that purpose.


    This clip reminds me of a fun take on our existence. I'm sure many have seen this but here goes:


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    Oct 14, 2009 9:52 PM GMT
    deep%20space.jpg

    100,000,000,000 galaxies.

    200 billion stars like our Sun in the Milky Way alone.

    NASA estimates (in 2002) there are 70 solar systems in the Milky Way.
    (http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/en/kids/phonedrmarc/2002_march.shtml)

    The human brain has 100,000,000,000 neurons, and 100,000,000,000,000 synapses.
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neuron)


    Smi32neuron.jpg
    atom2.jpg
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    Oct 17, 2009 9:36 AM GMT
    n8698u saiddeep%20space.jpg

    100,000,000,000 galaxies.

    200 billion stars like our Sun in the Milky Way alone.

    NASA estimates (in 2002) there are 70 solar systems in the Milky Way.
    (http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/en/kids/phonedrmarc/2002_march.shtml)

    The human brain has 100,000,000,000 neurons, and 100,000,000,000,000 synapses.
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neuron)


    Next time someone says to me "I don't want to live forever I'll get bored," I'll just show him these stats and say, "No you'll just be too stupid to fathom the existence of forever which is clearly this!"
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    Oct 17, 2009 9:48 AM GMT
    I don't feel insignificant at all, it's moving in a way
  • NickoftheNort...

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    Oct 17, 2009 11:51 AM GMT
    I don't feel insignificant because of the absurd-yet-real size of our universe. Instead, it makes me appreciate how much we have yet to learn and uncover (and how our religious approaches to understanding our universe by and large fall short of explaining its complexity and size).

    As for the numinous experience of appreciating its size, I have already gone through it by just looking up at the skies at the stars (when there is little to no light pollution blocking my view). Seeing (and reflecting on) a purely starlit heaven should be a mandatory part of a science curriculum.
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    Oct 17, 2009 11:58 AM GMT
    Cool, now all we need is tereseus1 to carefully review the images to find the link proving once and for all that Big Foot, the Loch Ness Monster and chupacabras are all advanced scouts for an alien invasion of apocalyptic proportion.