Is Junk Media Making You Sick?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 16, 2007 1:59 AM GMT
    What do you think?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 16, 2007 2:47 AM GMT
    Manufacturing Consent.
  • Alan95823

    Posts: 306

    Dec 16, 2007 3:33 AM GMT
    sigh... I miss Walter Cronkite. You always felt so much better informed after watching him. About the only pseudo-news media personality I trust these days is Jon Stewart.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 16, 2007 4:22 AM GMT
    thanks for sharing the video, i thought it was pretty good
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 16, 2007 4:39 AM GMT
    And much of it prophesied 30 years ago in the 1976 film "Network":

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 16, 2007 5:46 AM GMT
    I think it was also known much before then. The propaganda industry has been rechristened, at least I believe, as the modern-day public relations industry. As any reader of Orwell knows, the British Ministry of Information is a clear testament to the shaping of public opinion, keeping the masses distracted and fragmented. What is most surprising is how many people actually -know- about it but are disinterested in the matter.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 16, 2007 6:39 AM GMT
    Exactly how I feel about the news media...

    Vote Steven Colbert for President 2008! (paid for by Doritos)
  • NickoftheNort...

    Posts: 1416

    Dec 16, 2007 8:29 AM GMT
    Yes, junk media has made me sick, makes me sick, and will likely continue to make me sick for the conceivable future.

    The amount of "substance" contained within contemporary tabloid reporting ensures that watching Pokémon is a more productive investment of my time. Whether it is Dobbs' anti-immigration ranting or the Mrs. Grundry's (probably mispelled) of Fox News, it is still intellectual vomit.

    Somewhat of a digression:
    It reminds me of one of the first few times I watched CCTV, the official Chinese international channel. While there were propagandist tendencies in reporting where propaganda was pertinent, it was still fascinating to watch a report on an international meeting where Presidents Hu Jintao, Vladimir Putin, and George Bush attended; the report focused purely on Jintao and Putin and their political relationship without even mentioning Bush. That alone was a dramatic shift from, well, most of the reporting I have seen in my Euro-American life.

    ***
    As a former gamer and a current games enthusiast, I recognize these tendencies outside of the mainstream socio-political "discussions" and celebrity gossip; reporting on games has taken major hits from the dumbing-down-process where celebrity x-factors overshadow games discussions (Spike TV is one such contributor). Have any of you experienced a similar dumbing-down within any particular hobby or interest you have (say, sports reporting?)?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 16, 2007 10:02 PM GMT
    This should make you question what you think you know about the candidates running for president in my opinion. I doubt the front-runners of the media are the real front-runners among the voting populous.
  • SpartanJock

    Posts: 199

    Dec 19, 2007 8:59 PM GMT
    In addition, people want to hear 'what's important to them' in only 5 minutes. Generally speaking, people are not interested in substantial debate, or discussion of any subject.

    It isn't the holy grail by any means, but I get most of my news from National Public Radio. There has been some dumbing down, if it were, of NPR, but at least they still give more than one side of any issue. However, I was thoroughly upset with NPR, as I was of the rest of the media, for lack of view points leading up to the invasion of Iraq.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 19, 2007 9:15 PM GMT
    Nationalist Propaganda Radio icon_cool.gif

    jk, I respect NPR although I don't listen to it. I like getting news from online because its an easy tool to search out any story and dig into the news.

    The internet news lets you be your own judge rather than trusting the word of a newspaper or news network. The inernet also presents news in a written form you can reread at will, while TV just presents mostly a face which people judge off. I think its part of the reason there is a difference in the polls for various political candidates.

    Online polls will show one minor candidate with a large following yet the paper will list him at 6%. Perhaps its because people who find their news online are more likely to dig deeper behind the bullshit and see the faces of the mainstream demons for what they really are.