A new way of curing cancer is being offered...

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 20, 2009 3:34 PM GMT
    Greetings

    I'm a student, in my second years, studying animation. Approximately a week ago we had a very interesting lecture held at our university.

    A group of people are launching a project (which I'll hopefully be a part of) related to the discipline I chose. They are offering a new way of treating certain kinds of cancer (and need help with getting their campaign 'out there', so we are producing an animated short related to this issue in essence to help inform people that something like that exists).

    Anyway, what we were basically explained is that cancer cells can be eliminated by injecting chlorophyll-based drugs into cancer-infected tissue and lighting this area with a specific kind of light, which results in cancer dying from oxygen deprivation.

    Apparently this treatment proved to be successful multiple times and this year this campaign is going to make a push to spread the word about this treatment. In case someone would like to look at it in more depth, the official website is http://www.killingcancer.co.uk/home.asp

    I hope it's ok that I'm posting this, just though it's useful to know a thing like that.

    Thank you for your time icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 20, 2009 8:46 PM GMT
    hey thanks for the info! Oncology is one of my interests, im going to check it out right now!
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    Oct 20, 2009 9:05 PM GMT
    As a survivor I really hope this new technique pans out As it sounds more humaine than the current treatment.

    Also as a survivor I would be skeptical of anything that was not proven and highly recomended agreed upon by qualified doctors
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    Oct 20, 2009 9:37 PM GMT
    Don't tell Pfizer, Merck, etc. They have a lot to lose in a cure scenario.
  • DiverScience

    Posts: 1426

    Oct 20, 2009 10:04 PM GMT
    Well... they might find themselves less underfunded if they A) Had real information on their site and B) If the information they had wasn't impossible.

    "the reaction changes the oxygen molecule that feeds the cells"

    What? This doesn't make any sense.

    First, oxygen doesn't feed cells. It's an oxidation agent to allow the final stages of the electron transport chain.

    Second, there is no "oxygen molecule." If there were, you'd die. Oxygen is exceptionally toxic to cells. If they mean hemoglobin, the oxygen carrying molecule, then they need serious work on their terminology.



    In fact, the website has it almost backwards.

    The photochemicals don't CHANGE oxygen, they directly RELEASE it, killing the cells it's in. The photosensitive chemicals are retained longer in cancerous cells, than in normal cells allowing the "targeting" of these cells.

    In short, it's a promising therapy, on which there is a LOT of work being done.

    If you want real information, check here.

    http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Therapy/photodynamic
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    Oct 20, 2009 10:29 PM GMT
    Cancer research has come so far. Where I live here in Tennessee we have the 2nd largest Relay For Life event in the state in raising money for Cancer research. I truly hope this will be something that will help in saving many lives.
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    Oct 20, 2009 11:43 PM GMT
    Diver...you rock.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 21, 2009 12:07 AM GMT
    Did anyone see this on 60 minutes?

    Diver, what do you think about it?

    http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=5394576n&tag=contentBody;housing

    (why when I click on the URL and insert the HTTP between the boxes it will not show up as a link?)
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    Oct 21, 2009 12:15 AM GMT

    Watch CBS News Videos Online
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Oct 21, 2009 12:42 AM GMT
    Any easy cure is always welcomed. How do you get the light to the tumor though?
  • DiverScience

    Posts: 1426

    Oct 21, 2009 1:59 AM GMT
    barriehomeboy saidAny easy cure is always welcomed. How do you get the light to the tumor though?


    Multiple methods. For near surface ones, shorter wavelength light will penetrate farther. For deeper ones, they've been using fiber optic filaments.
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    Oct 21, 2009 2:04 AM GMT
    Igeneer saidAs a survivor I really hope this new technique pans out As it sounds more humaine than the current treatment.

    Also as a survivor I would be skeptical of anything that was not proven and highly recomended agreed upon by qualified doctors

    ditto...but it sounds weird. I would need lots of success data.
  • DiverScience

    Posts: 1426

    Oct 21, 2009 2:06 AM GMT
    pecfan saidDid anyone see this on 60 minutes?

    Diver, what do you think about it?


    Conceptually, there's nothing new about it. It's a method they've been working on for years. I first read about the theory almost 10 years ago now.

    Therapeutically, it's a great idea, the problem is finding a method of delivering the gold nanoparticles. You can inject them, but that only gets the local cells, which means the incidence of resurgence is exceptionally high.

  • Sabreur

    Posts: 4

    Jan 06, 2010 11:23 PM GMT
    Thank goodness there are biochemists out there who immediately question something stated.
    Upon reading the initial post and the info on the pages suggested, I'd just like to re-iterate what DiverScience has said, if you had oxygen freely moving around your cells they'd be in serious trouble, due to its exceptional reactivity and the fact that almost every single; protein, lipid or carbohydrate will react adversly to the presence of an oxidative compound. A prime example of oxidative stress is Alzheimers disease, where oxygen free radicals and hydroxyl free radicals destroy the cells in the cerebral cortex of the brain. This is believed to be due to the build up of Beta plaques within those areas.
    Besides, chlorophyll, which is a heme-like structure, possess the ability to bind oxygen and thus release it once stimulated by light causing free radical oxgyen formation, and thats bad for the cell unfortunate enough to have chlorophyll in it. Plants get around this problem by having the powerful compounds called the carotenoids, these are found right next to the cholorphyll in plant cells.

    So in essence when the chloropyll is stimulated by the specific wavelength of light it releases the oxygen free radical which kills the cell.