Paint sprayers

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    Oct 26, 2009 4:35 AM GMT
    I've just finished drywalling my basement and since the ceilings are only 6'8" high, I'm leaving the joists exposed. I'm tempted to just spray the entire basement (joists included) white.

    Are sprayers awkward to operate and is the coverage as decent as a roller?
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    Oct 26, 2009 5:03 AM GMT
    sprayers are easy once you have the technical stuff down, coverage isn't as good as a roller however you can put down more coats significantly faster.

    depending on the paint you will either thin the paint with water or a flow medium or even not at all depending on the sprayer you are using.

    depending on the sprayer you use you will either have a wide but thin spray pattern or a round one and you want to put down multiple coats rather then one thick one which will prevent runs.

    Something to watch out for are flash drying (the paint dries before it hits the wall) or an over wet spray which will promote runs.

    Good thing with spraying through is usually the pain dries significantly faster so it lets you put down more coats incredibly fast, this place I'm in, the entire house was done with 5 coats in about 4 hours by two people, including the two base coats and three top colour coats.
  • MikePhilPerez

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    Oct 26, 2009 1:03 PM GMT
    26mileman saidI've just finished drywalling my basement and since the ceilings are only 6'8" high, I'm leaving the joists exposed. I'm tempted to just spray the entire basement (joists included) white.

    Are sprayers awkward to operate and is the coverage as decent as a roller?


    Have you a photo? My advice is not to spray the joists white. Make a feature of the joists. I would need to see a photo of it first, to see if it is worth it.
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    Oct 26, 2009 3:58 PM GMT
    meh... sprayers are messy and be sure you have a respirator or some kind of mask. all that floating around is very bad.
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    Oct 26, 2009 4:16 PM GMT
    They are fast when they are working but down time (nozzle clogs) with the cheap sprayers counters acts the savings in a small job.
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    Oct 26, 2009 4:22 PM GMT
    lilTanker saiddepending on the paint you will either thin the paint with water or a flow medium or even not at all depending on the sprayer you are using.


    Very important!

    I found this out the hard way on my own.
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    Oct 26, 2009 4:40 PM GMT
    The clean-up is rather tedious and time-consuming. Unless it's a really big job, it's almost always faster to use disposable rollers and pad edgers. About the only time I use my sprayer any more is to get a nice flat coat on sheet metal.

    And I'm not sure that drywall primer/sealer would work very well if watered down for spraying.
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    Oct 28, 2009 9:37 AM GMT
    mindgarden saidAnd I'm not sure that drywall primer/sealer would work very well if watered down for spraying.

    Primer can be used just as effectively in a sprayer as a roller.

    you can get primers that are specifically formulated for spraying equipment, they have less fillers and if you need to thin the primer you use a specific flow control medium.

    Alpha made a good point about the effectiveness of cheap nozzles, if you are hiring the equipment to do the spraying make sure the nozzle is a good quality one AND that the compressor is powerful enough to handle the spray gun.

    Also there are a couple of different types of spray guns on the market, each needs a slightly different technique to be most effective.

    And for clean up, proper masking and using plastic drop sheets over doors, windows, holes will stop the paint entering areas you don't want.
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    Oct 28, 2009 9:43 AM GMT
    They're intended for big jobs. I think you'd be better off doing it the old fashioned way.