5-Year-Old Body Builder: Kid Sensation or Child Abuse

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    Oct 28, 2009 11:12 PM GMT
    This has been all over the news and media lately. I am surprised nobody has mentioned it. What do you guys think?


    http://www.thefrisky.com/post/246-five-year-old-body-builder-child-sensation-or-child-abuse/
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    Oct 28, 2009 11:28 PM GMT
    some fitness experts like Jessie Pavelka, host of Diet Tribe, thinks that push the body that hard at such a young age can damage epiphyseal plates ( or growth plates) stunting growth
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    Oct 28, 2009 11:50 PM GMT


    Hopefully he at least becomes an Olympian or something!
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    Oct 29, 2009 12:02 AM GMT
    i see nothing too wrong with it

    i'd rather see that than ur avergae american 5 year old(fat piece of unathletic shit)
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    Oct 29, 2009 12:31 AM GMT
    track_boi saidi see nothing too wrong with it

    i'd rather see that than ur avergae american 5 year old(fat piece of unathletic shit)


    true, no one likes seeing a real life jabba the hutt, but seriously, I've read in MANY sources that extremely early development of muscles causes stunt in growth and a superiority complex. It sort of seems like the dad is pushing the kid. I think that as long as the kid is cool with it then whatever, just the parents should be informed about the drawbacks. And I don't think the "average" American five year old is a fat piece of shit, seriously though, I've seen rail thin kids, as well as fat kids. icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Oct 29, 2009 1:24 AM GMT
    The following is from the American Academy of Pediatrics...Committee on Sports Medicine and Fitness policy statement on "Strength Training by Children and Adolescents"


    A limited number of case reports have raised concern about epiphyseal injuries in the wrist and apophyseal injuries in the spine from weight lifting in skeletally immature individuals. Such injuries are uncommon and are believed to be largely preventable by avoiding improper lifting techniques, maximal lifts, and improperly supervised lifts.

    Strength training programs do not seem to adversely affect linear growth and do not seem to have any long-term detrimental effect on cardiovascular health. Young athletes with hypertension may experience further elevation of blood pressure from the isometric demands of strength training.

    In preadolescents, proper resistance training can enhance strength without concomitant muscle hypertrophy. Such gains in strength can be attributed to neuromuscular "learning," in which training increases the number of motor neurons that will fire with each muscle contraction. This mechanism helps explain strength gains from resistance training in populations with low androgen levels, including females and preadolescent males. Strength training can also augment the muscle enlargement that normally occurs with pubertal growth in males and females

    http://aappolicy.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/pediatrics;107/6/1470

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    Oct 29, 2009 1:37 AM GMT
    ThePenIsMyTier said

    Hopefully he at least becomes an Olympian or something!


    I have to say this is at least fascinating to watch.
    I wonder if this training is a bit excessive for his ageicon_question.gif
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    Oct 29, 2009 2:29 AM GMT
    tryingtolive saidsome fitness experts like Jessie Pavelka, host of Diet Tribe, thinks that push the body that hard at such a young age can damage epiphyseal plates ( or growth plates) stunting growth


    Actually there's no evidence to support that. If anything, he'll be in far better physical shape, have better motor skills, have better discipline, and have an overall better quality of life than his peers.
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    Oct 29, 2009 2:39 AM GMT
    Yeah, but being a 5 year old should be about having fuuunn. Maybe he has some by training. Maybe his dad is extremely strict. Whatever he does he better be having fun! Hope he has some friends (mutual training buddies? lol).

  • Oct 29, 2009 2:53 AM GMT
    Wow that was the gayest thing i ever saw....that poor kid, his dad is setting him up to be a raging homo just like the rest of us!

    no but seriously..is it natural for a 5 year old to be able to do all that? i think the little boy could kick my ass in a fight...
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    Oct 29, 2009 3:06 AM GMT
    I was a terribly skinny kid and I actually kind of wish someone had shown me some kind of strength training when I was young. Maybe being more physically fit, I would not have developed juvenile diabetes in my teens or at least maybe I could have delayed it for a few years.
    The real child abuse is from parents who feed their children pop tarts and Hawiian Punch for breakfast, send them to school with Lunchables, and then take them to McDonalds, Burger King, Or Taco Bell every evening for dinner, especially with all we know today.
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    Oct 29, 2009 3:20 AM GMT
    this is bs... let the kid be a kid. I my little "nephew" whom is also his age has a perfectly defined 6 pack right now but thats from lots of sports... running, swimming, baseball... I mean the kid loves sports... and his parents didn't push him in to it either. Not sure where I stand on this but not sure I could push my child as crazy as apparently his father did.
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    Oct 29, 2009 3:23 AM GMT
    I saw him on a T.V. program ( can't remember which one) it seems a bit excessive for his age. Although on the other hand it looks like he's really enjoying himself. There are a lot of sports kids start at a young age (i.e. I was a swimmer) maybe this is no different.
  • MikemikeMike

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    Oct 29, 2009 3:29 AM GMT
    The kid seems to enjoy it. I think it beats letting him eat fast food daily-now that is child abuse- He will be an oustanding gymnast someday!! It's a bit much for a 5 yr old but he can out do most guys in hereicon_idea.gif
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    Oct 29, 2009 12:59 PM GMT
    terrible!
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    Oct 30, 2009 5:26 PM GMT
    that's kind of excessive but mainly because we're not used to it.,
    It's not part of our culture to bring kids to that level.

    but how many remember Nadia Comaneci ?Olympic Gold medal in gymnastics at 15 y.o. . So obviously she wasn't watching TV at age 5 .

    i prefer seeing that than hearing of kids working in factories , like those extremely young children weaving amazing indian ( and others) carpets all day long in almost complete darkness to protect the fabrics and colors ... carpets 'we' love buying.
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    Oct 30, 2009 5:27 PM GMT
    Sounds like child abuse to me.
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    Oct 30, 2009 5:45 PM GMT
    Looking at the vid he´s just a precocious gymnast... unusually young, but not really unique.
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    Oct 30, 2009 5:52 PM GMT
    My youngest brother's a prodigy with ColdFusion programming and he's only 12. Same general thing, different specialty, and in no way child abuse. He's doing what he likes even if he's getting like no social exposure lol!
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    Oct 30, 2009 6:37 PM GMT
    I bet that kid could kick my ass.

    AAAAAAAAAND now I've given myself a complex
  • GTBL88

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    Oct 30, 2009 6:44 PM GMT
    This is absolutely disgusting. The parents should be ashamed of themselves. I can't watch it for too long, it make me throw up.
  • rdberg1957

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    Oct 30, 2009 6:47 PM GMT
    I think 5 year olds should be playing and having fun, not training. A fit 5 year old needs to be pulled away from the TV/video games to run around and play outdoors as much as possible. Training is primarily for athletes: adolescents and adults.
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    Oct 31, 2009 2:59 AM GMT
    I'm afraid so much time taken for development rather than natural developmental "Play" will come back to bit him later in life. Every child needs Play and freedom to do so to develop, too much structure can do more harm than good. the boy is phenominal though, it would worry me if he were in my family. but of course I don't know the whole story, just concerned.
  • zakariahzol

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    Oct 31, 2009 3:41 AM GMT
    There a lot of this case in Asia. About a miracle boy from India (I forget his age), who run a full marathon. A Malaysian kid who is a mathematic genious. Another genious Malaysian kid who become a media sensation back in the 70's , ended up to be a drug addict and a chicken seller as an adult. The reason....because he cant handle the media attention, the pressure for him to perform, the stress. One cases of a British girl of Malaysian descent Safiah Yusof or Shilpa Lee (my second cousin), create a news frenzy when she graduate from oxford as a teenager (again I forget her age) and hail as extraordinary Malaysian descended . The Malaysian goverment sponsor her education and she was even invited to the audience , with Malaysia King in National Palace. She latter on run away form home and ended being a prostitute, in some sleazy London back alley. She claim her Pakistani father is mentally abusing her to perform . Her family even use mathematic formula to tell a joke. Life at home are pure hell , with her father keep demanding her to suceed. Enough say

    Kids should be kids.

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    Nov 01, 2009 6:20 AM GMT
    if the kid truly enjoys it; and if he is allowed to lose interest; and if he isn't getting injured; and if his family is supportive, even when he isn't focused; and if he is balancing all of this with having a childhood... then i say go for it... however, the real risk here is early burnout and internal collapse.