HIV a chronic, manageable disease??? Info for HIV-negative people

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    Nov 03, 2009 1:38 AM GMT
    I think this information should be read by as many HIV-negative guys as possible. It might renew your commitments to safer sex. I copied this over from http://joemygod.blogspot.com/:
    David France http://nymag.com/health/features/61740/Some fifteen years into the era of protease inhibitors and drug cocktails, doctors are realizing that the miracles the drugs promised are not necessarily a lasting solution to the disease. Most news accounts today call HIV a chronic, manageable disease. But patients who contracted the virus just a few years back are showing signs of what’s being called premature or accelerated aging. Early senility turns out to be an increasingly common problem, though not nearly as extreme as James’s in every case. One large-scale multi-city study released its latest findings this summer that over half of the HIV-positive population is suffering some form of cognitive impairment. Doctors are also reporting a constellation of ailments in middle-aged patients that are more typically seen at geriatric practices, in patients 80 and older. They range from bone loss to organ failure to arthritis. Making matters worse, HIV patients are registering higher rates of insulin resistance and cholesterol imbalances, and they suffer elevated rates of melanoma and kidney cancers and seven times the rate of other non-HIV-related cancers.

    Whether this is a result of the drugs or the disease itself, or some combination, is still an open question and certainly varies from patient to patient and condition to condition. Either way, it is now clear that even patients who respond well to medications by today’s standards are not out of the woods. Current life-expectancy charts show that people on HIV medications could live twenty fewer years on average than the general population. “It’s spooky,” says Mark Harrington, who heads Treatment Action Group, a New York–based HIV think tank. “It seems like the virus keeps finding new tricks to throw at us, and we’re just all left behind going, What’s going on?”


    Complete article (pretty long) here: http://nymag.com/health/features/61740/
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    Nov 03, 2009 4:39 AM GMT
    Yes thank you indeed
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    Nov 03, 2009 4:41 AM GMT
    Shit. Thanks. I'm abstaining from sex now.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 03, 2009 4:44 AM GMT
    See, I knew I was going senile early!
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    Nov 03, 2009 4:51 AM GMT
    GuerrillaSodomite saidSee, I knew I was going senile early!


    It's o.k. I'll keep stuffing your face with cookie dough ice cream while we play Old Maid.

    In all seriousness, it's good to educate although don't live in fear.
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    Nov 03, 2009 4:54 AM GMT
    26mileman said
    GuerrillaSodomite saidSee, I knew I was going senile early!


    It's o.k. I'll keep stuffing your face with cookie dough ice cream while we play Old Maid.


    Make it bridge or canasta and you have a deal.icon_wink.gif
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    Nov 03, 2009 4:59 AM GMT
    o.K. and I promise to comb your hair for your passport photo.icon_wink.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 03, 2009 5:03 AM GMT
    26mileman saido.K. and I promise to comb your hair for your passport photo.icon_wink.gif


    No combs! I have much childhood trauma concerning them.icon_cry.gif
  • victor8

    Posts: 237

    Nov 03, 2009 5:11 AM GMT
    generally speaking, its no surprise that taking a cocktail of drugs is going to affect the organs...esp the liver...its tough...and a good reason to keep on keepin on practising safer sex!!
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    Nov 03, 2009 7:39 AM GMT
    Thanks for this. I passed it on to a friend who is ostracized by the gay community for not believing in the current theory of HIV treatment.
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    Nov 03, 2009 8:10 AM GMT
    GuerrillaSodomite said
    26mileman said
    GuerrillaSodomite saidSee, I knew I was going senile early!


    It's o.k. I'll keep stuffing your face with cookie dough ice cream while we play Old Maid.


    Make it bridge or canasta and you have a deal.icon_wink.gif


    would you even know the difference at that point icon_rolleyes.gif

    hehe icon_razz.gif
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    Nov 03, 2009 11:35 AM GMT
    Thanks for the article...very interesting read. And yes, I believe all should read this article. Not being informed is unhealthy for both sides.
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    Nov 03, 2009 2:12 PM GMT
    Being HIV+ this kind of stuff puts a pit in my stomach every time I see it....so, this is for anyone else like me...i asked my doc if he's seeing this. I live in the metro NY area, so for all you HIV+ guys, i wanted to share his info....the cut and dry...keep active and eat well...

    the reply: Yes, we do see it. But a few things to keep in mind; most often the aging and lipodistribution is more common in people that have have HIV for a real long time and have been on the earliest drugs available such as AZT and Crixovan. The newer drugs and combinations do not have as profound an effect. Also this is seen most often in people that are noncompliant with their meds, have frequent drops in their CD4, lead "rough" lives, alcohol, drug use, and smoking.
    Although a newly diagnosed HIV individual today has the same life expectancy as nonHIV (assuming they have access to medical care and medications and are adherent) we do see a phenomena of seeing illnesses earlier. For example, if you were HIV neg and genetically inclined to develop heart disease at age 70, in the presence of HIV you might see the same heart disease at age 60.
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    Nov 03, 2009 2:20 PM GMT
    Triathlete1970 said
    Although a newly diagnosed HIV individual today has the same life expectancy as nonHIV (assuming they have access to medical care and medications and are adherent) we do see a phenomena of seeing illnesses earlier. For example, if you were HIV neg and genetically inclined to develop heart disease at age 70, in the presence of HIV you might see the same heart disease at age 60.


    Which would make sense given that HIV is an immune deficiency disease. If you're fighting an immune disease via meds and your own immune system, that busies the immune system, taking time away from other more normative repairs that would prevent premature aging and other "old age" conditions.

    Ugh. The dangers of sexual self-expression. Very disheartening.
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    Nov 03, 2009 2:38 PM GMT
    It seems no real study has taken place, because of the urgency of the illness itself. A person is stuck between side effects and medication or faced with a disease untreated. It's a hard decision either way. We all know if HIV goes untreated, the potential harm, and avoidable illnesses, ultimately resulting in death, is the alternative, if not for the new cocktails. Time is factor, and until we play this out no one truly knows for sure.
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    Nov 03, 2009 3:57 PM GMT
    Either way, it's a chronic disease, and your death date is moved up. The moral of the story? Personal responsibility. Social responsibility to society in general. You see, it's not all about me, me, me. In 2009, HIV is nearly 100% preventable.
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    Nov 03, 2009 4:13 PM GMT
    I don't want to turn this into a bashing but, really, Chucky'stud' as you call yourself, you come off as if you are an expert on things. I equate you to an imbecile.

    Talk to any infectious Disease doctor and you will find that ALL studies being conducted are in their infancy stages as the ARV's available are still being tested.

    True, its a chronic disease, but your comment about it not being about me, me, me....who are you to say anything....I would focus on things like steroids and their abuse to the body if I were you.
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    Nov 03, 2009 4:49 PM GMT
    This is very hopeful. My friend that im "hanging out with" and I got tested yesterday. Even though i was pretty sure im still negative it was still nerve wrecking to be there. Its kind of weird how this disease can really affect the mind and its course of thinking
  • jarhead5536

    Posts: 1348

    Nov 03, 2009 5:10 PM GMT
    Triathlete1970 saidI don't want to turn this into a bashing but, really, Chucky'stud' as you call yourself, you come off as if you are an expert on things. I equate you to an imbecile.

    Talk to any infectious Disease doctor and you will find that ALL studies being conducted are in their infancy stages as the ARV's available are still being tested.

    True, its a chronic disease, but your comment about it not being about me, me, me....who are you to say anything....I would focus on things like steroids and their abuse to the body if I were you.


    I wouldn't go so far as to directly call chucky names (since the only predictable result is another tiresome pie fight), but some people can be so sanctimonious, smugly tossing around the phrase "personal responsibility" as though everyone with this disease is automatically a bad person. The condescension and judgement inherent in such an attitude are, if you can believe it, more painful than any physical symptoms we might have...
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    Nov 03, 2009 5:16 PM GMT
    jarhead,

    agreed and noted
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    Nov 03, 2009 5:20 PM GMT
    I think what Chucky is getting at is that everyone who contracted HIV wasn't raped by a pos guy or under some similar situation. It's more likely to contract it in a lapse in better judgment.

    And Chucky, there's no way this disease is nearly 100% preventable. Especially since we're talking about a community with an overwhelmingly large disposition to regularly perform the riskiest of behaviors.
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    Nov 03, 2009 5:27 PM GMT
    Do you mean the communities of Africa where the disease is most prevalent? Yep, fucking a cunt is very risky for the fucker and the fuckee. Perhaps you mean the communities of Russia where HIV infection rates are out of control primarily from shared needle use? Maybe you mean hemophiliacs engaging in that disgusting business of blood transfusions?
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    Nov 03, 2009 5:57 PM GMT
    McGay saidDo you mean the communities of Africa where the disease is most prevalent? Yep, fucking a cunt is very risky for the fucker and the fuckee. Perhaps you mean the communities of Russia where HIV infection rates are out of control primarily from shared needle use? Maybe you mean hemophiliacs engaging in that disgusting business of blood transfusions?



    Nope, I mean gay men who regularly have anal sex despite the many complications and overall health risk. Health risk evidenced by the fact that, even in this day and age where information and protection are universally available, gay men are STILL contracting the disease at a much greater rate than other communities.
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    Nov 03, 2009 6:58 PM GMT
    Well, that's odd, because you're the only one talking about 1 particular community. The OP's quote doesn't mention any one community at all. Further, what makes you think unprotected anal sex among gay men is the riskiest of all behaviors? Needle sharing's not as risky? Heterosexual anal sex? You're intent on singling out what you think of as lesser people than yourself within the gay population, even though you're gay (despite your denial of same).
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    Nov 03, 2009 7:10 PM GMT
    RunintheCity said
    Triathlete1970 said

    Ugh. The dangers of sexual self-expression.


    That is a very strange and yet very telling remark.