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Important question about prostate cancer

  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Nov 06, 2009 5:35 PM GMT
    I will get to my question in a bit but there is a lot of talk lately about prostate cancer. Articles are showing up in major newspapers. At any given time, there are 200,000 men walking around that don’t know they have it. According to facts, if a man lives long enough he will have prostate cancer. Even getting it, most likely you will die of either old age or another disease unless, of course, it is aggressive. I have been diagnosed with having it and I am weighing all the procedures available or do a Watchful/Waiting for a while to see how I am with a new PSA test.

    The consequences of removing the prostate are a major concern – incontinence, both urine and bowl and erectile dysfunction. There are guys that choose doing nothing for quality of life over being subjected to the aforementioned and living the rest of their life in a bathroom and no longer having a social life. With this said, here is a very important question that I asked my urologist and he had no answer. He looked very surprised when I asked the following and said that it was certainly an important question. I wanted to know if when the prostate was removed, would there be any feeling in that area. This is a major and important question for gay men because of anal sex. Since the urologist had no answer, I attended my first prostate cancer support meeting the other night. All the men there were straight. I boldly asked them that since their prostates were removed, did they have any feeling in that area. They all looked surprised by my question and said, “Why do I care about any feeling in that area?” I could sense the immediate defensive attitude by my asking. I said calmly that any form of massaging of the prostate would make a man sexually aroused. One immediately said in an agitated tone, “Well, I am not the least bit interested or about to have my prostate area massaged.” Their ignorance was amusing. How any man can go through life and know little about parts of his body is surprising. Their responses clearly showed me that all they thought the prostate did was be sort of responsible for urine cutoff and to shoot semen and nothing more. To further my question, does anyone know if there is feeling in the area where the prostate once was? This will obviously have to be answered by someone who has had their prostate removed or perhaps, a gay doctor that is a member of the forum.
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Nov 29, 2009 7:17 PM GMT
    Well, gee! I did this post sometime ago and I am surprised that no one has commented or has had any thoughts on this matter. I have decided that all YOU GIRLS think that only REAL MEN get prostate cancer and it doesn’t apply to you. You just might get it and have to have your prostate removed and end up dead down there. Your fucking days will be over. Of course, you can lie there and eat bonbons while your partner is screwing you and say, “When you are through, do you want to have a pizza and watch a movie?”
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Nov 29, 2009 7:21 PM GMT
    LOL this is a fucking riot. Not the subject matter, but the stark contrast in tone bw the first post and the second. That'll be a sure way to get legitimate responses...insult the whole community! Idiot.

    This seems like a fake post anyway.
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Nov 29, 2009 7:32 PM GMT
    It got your attention, yo-yo. I suggest you take the matter more seriously. Fake post, my ass. You need to read more on health issues and spend less time on gay porno sites.
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Nov 29, 2009 7:45 PM GMT
    A 64 year old picture-less with an anger issue.

    Almost every man will get prostate cancer if he lives long enough. Many folks in their elder years live with it, as it is very slow moving. With early detection, prostate cancer is almost always not fatal. In fact, my dad has been dealing with prostate cancer for years now, as did his late brother.

    There's some thought that low testosterone to estrogen ratios cause the issue. Others feel it's the presence of androgen. Most folks who begin HRT early seem to have a protection from it. Testosterone has many benefits, and, especially at 64, if you aren't taking it, you likely should be.

    I'd suggest researching this at http://www.cancer.org (The American Cancer Society) rather than lashing out at folks on RealJock.com. I think you'll find that if you direct your query at the appropriate resource you'll be much more successful towards your end goal.
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Nov 29, 2009 7:52 PM GMT
    markthespot saidI will get to my question in a bit but there is a lot of talk lately about prostate cancer. Articles are showing up in major newspapers. At any given time, there are 200,000 men walking around that don’t know they have it. According to facts, if a man lives long enough he will have prostate cancer. Even getting it, most likely you will die of either old age or another disease unless, of course, it is aggressive. I have been diagnosed with having it and I am weighing all the procedures available or do a Watchful/Waiting for a while to see how I am with a new PSA test.

    The consequences of removing the prostate are a major concern – incontinence, both urine and bowl and erectile dysfunction. There are guys that choose doing nothing for quality of life over being subjected to the aforementioned and living the rest of their life in a bathroom and no longer having a social life. With this said, here is a very important question that I asked my urologist and he had no answer. He looked very surprised when I asked the following and said that it was certainly an important question. I wanted to know if when the prostate was removed, would there be any feeling in that area. This is a major and important question for gay men because of anal sex. Since the urologist had no answer, I attended my first prostate cancer support meeting the other night. All the men there were straight. I boldly asked them that since their prostates were removed, did they have any feeling in that area. They all looked surprised by my question and said, “Why do I care about any feeling in that area?” I could sense the immediate defensive attitude by my asking. I said calmly that any form of massaging of the prostate would make a man sexually aroused. One immediately said in an agitated tone, “Well, I am not the least bit interested or about to have my prostate area massaged.” Their ignorance was amusing. How any man can go through life and know little about parts of his body is surprising. Their responses clearly showed me that all they thought the prostate did was be sort of responsible for urine cutoff and to shoot semen and nothing more. To further my question, does anyone know if there is feeling in the area where the prostate once was? This will obviously have to be answered by someone who has had their prostate removed or perhaps, a gay doctor that is a member of the forum.


    In “The Ups and Downs of Gay Sex After Prostate Cancer Treatment,” Steven Goldstone, MD, addresses practical questions regarding gay sex after a man has been treated for prostate cancer. He also addresses some of the concerns of the partners of gay man with prostate cancer. Dr. Goldstone offers the reader a practical and matter of fact primer of what may happen during and what to do after prostate cancer treatment.

    http://www.malecare.com/gay-prostate-cancer_68.htm. This may help you. I very informative sight that addresses your concerns and many links and suggested readings.


  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Nov 29, 2009 9:27 PM GMT
    Thanks, chuckystud and deimos66329. See, guys, it isn’t so tuff to make a response. Chuckystud, you make a good point but it really is unwise to ignore one having prostate cancer. You need to find out if it is aggressive and if it is, you damn well better do something about it. Men at a certain age, around 70 at times can ignore having it because likely they will die of another disease. Normally, it is a slow growing disease. My question was originally a very important one. I sent an email to a gay doctor on his site that said he would respond to all questions. Well, I am still waiting. I sent another note and no response. This is why I decided to post on this forum, thinking someone might have an answer.

    Deimos66329, welcome to the forum and thank you for your suggestion, as well as input on the subject.

    No need, deebram (d-brain) for your snide and ignorant remarks. If you haven’t got anything positive or worthwhile to say, keep it in your pants.
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Nov 29, 2009 9:34 PM GMT
    markthespot saidThanks, chuckystud and deimos66329. See, guys, it isn’t so tuff to make a response. Chuckystud, you make a good point but it really is unwise to ignore one having prostate cancer. You need to find out if it is aggressive and if it is, you damn well better do something about it. Men at a certain age, around 70 at times can ignore having it because likely they will die of another disease. Normally, it is a slow growing disease. My question was originally a very important one. I sent an email to a gay doctor on his site that said he would respond to all questions. Well, I am still waiting. I sent another note and no response. This is why I decided to post on this forum, thinking someone might have an answer.

    Deimos66329, welcome to the forum and thank you for your suggestion, as well as input on the subject.

    No need, deebram (d-brain) for your snide and ignorant remarks. If you haven’t got anything positive or worthwhile to say, keep it in your pants.


    You might wish to try another venue, as I suggested.
  • QUOTE Aug 16, 2010 9:18 AM GMT
    I am late in posting but think this is an important issue too.

    The thought of losing or reducing the power tool is pretty shockingicon_eek.gifhttp://assets.rjstatic.com/images/global/icon_eek.gif

    Talking to doctors is best but you normally get the "standard" responses of treatment and surgery, etc, ignoring what caused it in the first place.

    I researched allot and belong to yahoo groups where other researchers discuss options.

    My PSA was rising but not too high of a score so I have been experiementing with herbal remidies. I find that testorsterone can be converted to a bad hormone called DHT in older men. Thats why doctors typically prescribe testosterone blockers to treat cancer. Instead, I have been on a couple of estrogen blockers that some what help reduce the DHT. I stopped taking the androgen suppliments as well. I am over due for a PSA check up, but will post again when I have results. So far I have stalled the previous increasing PSA scores. I have allot more info too, but too tired to write anymore, lolls.

    sorry for the bad spelling.

    ED
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Aug 16, 2010 11:49 PM GMT
    There is a great gay men's prostate group on Yahoo:

    prostatecancerandgaymen@yahoogroups.com

    the guys on there will answer anything. Even straight guys belong because gay men talk so much more openly about sexual stuff.

  • QUOTE Aug 17, 2010 5:39 AM GMT
    Yeah, most of the stuff I learned was from belonging to the yahoo groups,
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Aug 17, 2010 6:03 AM GMT
    My indirect experiences with prostate cancer:

    A friend and sometimes bedmate got prostate cancer in 2005 at 70. His urologist recommended total removal of the prostate, which he got. It left him incontinent and impotent. Even my mouth couldn't get a rise out of him. His dick is dead.

    My current partner got prostate cancer in 2004. His urologist recommended radioactive seed implants. His cancer is gone, his PSA blood readings are lower than mine, and he is fully functional sexually. Plus no incontinence, really no change in him in any way, except he basically shoots blanks now. He is not a bottom, so I can't answer that part of your question.

    My father got prostate cancer in his 70s. He stalled with getting any treatment, and by the time he finally did, it was too late. The cancer had metastasized to his bones, and he was doomed. A heart attack actually killed him, but he was told the cancer would take him in a few months anyway. And it wasn't pleasant or easy for him.

    With something like cancer always get a second opinion, but act quickly & aggressively. Prostate cancer is USUALLY relatively slow acting, and some doctors recommend a more conservative approach with most forms of it in older men. The thought is they'll die from other causes before the cancer, so why reduce their quality of life. Instead, it's closely monitored and a surgical approach is only used when absolutely necessary.

    If this is about yourself, then at your age, and mine (61) I think the seed implant should be discussed with your doctor. For myself I would resist surgical removal of any part of the prostate. But that is dependent upon the extent of the cancer, and what a biopsy reveals about its nature. If it's an aggressive form, there may be few options.
  • nicepecs Posts: 3
    QUOTE Apr 01, 2011 12:59 AM GMT
    II'm responding to this on March 31, 2011. I was diagnosed with prostate cancer after 3 years of monitoring my blood work. My PSA level jumped from 4.4 to 12.2 over 3 years. My second biopsy came back positive for the presence of cancer. I had a Gleason score of 6 which is an intermediate growing cancer. I met with one of the top radiologists in the country who recommended I have it removed. I was 52 at the time. Radiation is reserved mostly for older guys who will out live the cancer. If they radiate and don't get it on the first go around, they have to remove the prostate and both nerve bundles that control erections. I decided to have DaVinci Robotic Surgery in Miami in Nov, 2011. The road has been rough. Four months later I now have 98% bladder control but still wear protective pads to the gym. Straining causes me to leak maybe a teaspoons worth of piss. Of course there is no more semen. I can reach an orgasm but I have to use a medical vacuum pump to achieve a firm erection. Or I can jerk off a soft penis. It can be done, it just takes time and concentration. I've used Cialis alone but no luck. I was told not to expect much of an erection until 8 to 12 months. I use the pump 6 days a week to keep the blood vessels active or I will loose the ability to ever get an erection again.

    Doctor said I should not attempt anal sex for at least 8 months for fear of doing internal damage to where my urethra is re-attached to my bladder. I'm very interested to know if anal sex will ever be enjoyable again. Yes, I'm gay. It's bad enough loosing the visual of seeing semen shooting out of me, but loosing the enjoyment of anal sex will just be a cruel joke. There are 219,000 new prostate cancer paitents each year and 33,000 of those men die from not getting checked or finding out too late. Moral of the story, get your PSA levels checked. I just found out about my level by acciident. I had no symptoms. I was having routine blood work and my PSA was slightly elevated. Hope this helps anyone going through what I've been through.
  • DanOmatic Posts: 1141
    QUOTE Apr 01, 2011 1:17 AM GMT
    Hey Nicepecs, thanks for the candid response on here. I'm really sorry that you're going through all that (and sorry as well for the other posters who have also had to contend with the negative side effects of prostate cancer treatment).

    My dad is still suffering from the aftermath of radiation treatment for his prostate cancer. It's very disheartening to see, though he keeps a stiff upper lip about it (typical issues: incontinence, loose bowels, and I'm sure some serious sexual side effects, though probably less so than if he had had it removed).

    Good luck with everything, Nicepecs, and good luck to the OP.
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Apr 01, 2011 11:59 PM GMT
    nicepecs saidII'm responding to this on March 31, 2011. I was diagnosed with prostate cancer after 3 years of monitoring my blood work. My PSA level jumped from 4.4 to 12.2 over 3 years. My second biopsy came back positive for the presence of cancer. I had a Gleason score of 6 which is an intermediate growing cancer. I met with one of the top radiologists in the country who recommended I have it removed. I was 52 at the time. Radiation is reserved mostly for older guys who will out live the cancer. If they radiate and don't get it on the first go around, they have to remove the prostate and both nerve bundles that control erections. I decided to have DaVinci Robotic Surgery in Miami in Nov, 2011. The road has been rough. Four months later I now have 98% bladder control but still wear protective pads to the gym. Straining causes me to leak maybe a teaspoons worth of piss. Of course there is no more semen. I can reach an orgasm but I have to use a medical vacuum pump to achieve a firm erection. Or I can jerk off a soft penis. It can be done, it just takes time and concentration. I've used Cialis alone but no luck. I was told not to expect much of an erection until 8 to 12 months. I use the pump 6 days a week to keep the blood vessels active or I will loose the ability to ever get an erection again.

    Doctor said I should not attempt anal sex for at least 8 months for fear of doing internal damage to where my urethra is re-attached to my bladder. I'm very interested to know if anal sex will ever be enjoyable again. Yes, I'm gay. It's bad enough loosing the visual of seeing semen shooting out of me, but loosing the enjoyment of anal sex will just be a cruel joke. There are 219,000 new prostate cancer paitents each year and 33,000 of those men die from not getting checked or finding out too late. Moral of the story, get your PSA levels checked. I just found out about my level by acciident. I had no symptoms. I was having routine blood work and my PSA was slightly elevated. Hope this helps anyone going through what I've been through.

    Sorry about your diagnosis. Good luck with the surgery. I went the radiation and hormone blocker treatment route. Blogged my experience on RJ: http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/150050

    This is a great gay men's prostate cancer support group online: http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/prostatecancerandgaymen/ I definitely recommend you join the site and chat with the guys on there about the surgery and what to expect afterwards. There are guys from all over the world on there. Kinda interesting to hear about the treatments in other countries. There are also straight men on there....cuz gay men talk more openly and candidly about it...esp the sexual side effects ... hahahahaha

    Oh the only up side to all this is more intense orgasms.
  • Anto Posts: 2035
    QUOTE Apr 02, 2011 12:11 AM GMT
    Just some new info about the PSA testing:
    3/31/2011 - Prostate cancer test doesn't cut death risk, longest study finds
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Apr 02, 2011 12:19 AM GMT
    nicepecs saidII'm responding to this on March 31, 2011. I was diagnosed with prostate cancer after 3 years of monitoring my blood work. My PSA level jumped from 4.4 to 12.2 over 3 years. My second biopsy came back positive for the presence of cancer. I had a Gleason score of 6 which is an intermediate growing cancer. I met with one of the top radiologists in the country who recommended I have it removed. I was 52 at the time. Radiation is reserved mostly for older guys who will out live the cancer. If they radiate and don't get it on the first go around, they have to remove the prostate and both nerve bundles that control erections. I decided to have DaVinci Robotic Surgery in Miami in Nov, 2011. The road has been rough. Four months later I now have 98% bladder control but still wear protective pads to the gym. Straining causes me to leak maybe a teaspoons worth of piss. Of course there is no more semen. I can reach an orgasm but I have to use a medical vacuum pump to achieve a firm erection. Or I can jerk off a soft penis. It can be done, it just takes time and concentration. I've used Cialis alone but no luck. I was told not to expect much of an erection until 8 to 12 months. I use the pump 6 days a week to keep the blood vessels active or I will loose the ability to ever get an erection again.

    Doctor said I should not attempt anal sex for at least 8 months for fear of doing internal damage to where my urethra is re-attached to my bladder. I'm very interested to know if anal sex will ever be enjoyable again. Yes, I'm gay. It's bad enough loosing the visual of seeing semen shooting out of me, but loosing the enjoyment of anal sex will just be a cruel joke. There are 219,000 new prostate cancer paitents each year and 33,000 of those men die from not getting checked or finding out too late. Moral of the story, get your PSA levels checked. I just found out about my level by acciident. I had no symptoms. I was having routine blood work and my PSA was slightly elevated. Hope this helps anyone going through what I've been through.



    omg, that's horrible! icon_sad.gif I'm so sorry you're going through this. I wish you a speedy, painless, and victorious battle with cancer. *hug*
    Two hugging smileys
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Apr 02, 2011 12:21 AM GMT
    Anto saidJust some new info about the PSA testing:
    3/31/2011 - Prostate cancer test doesn't cut death risk, longest study finds

    So what do they want you to do? Sit around until your bones hurt cuz the cancer has already metastasized?
  • MuchMoreThanM... Posts: 21492
    QUOTE Apr 02, 2011 12:29 AM GMT
    Hey there, everyone. My uncle is actually undergoing radiation treatment for prostate cancer. I did a term paper on it in honor of him for a college course I took called "Chronic Illness."

    I know there are a couple of spelling errors but I will fix them. I could not find the final copy I submitted to my professor but please disregard the spelling errors and I will fix them later tonight.

    I will post the paper here. It is a very basic paper. Hopefully it will give you guys some information.

    Introduction

    There are many types of cancers. One of them can be classified as hormone dependent. Hormone dependent cancers are those that affect the sexual reproductive tissues in both men in women. In women, hormone dependent cancers can involve breast tissue, ovaries, the cervix and uterus. Hormone dependent cancers in men involve the testicles and prostate. Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer that American men suffer from. The American Cancer Society estimates that 217,730 cases of prostate cancer were diagnosed for 2010 and that over 32,000 men will die of prostate cancer. Basically one in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during his lifetime and one in thirty-six will die of complications due to advanced prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death trailing behind lung cancer.

    What is the Prostate?


    The prostate is a sex gland that is roughly the size of a small kiwi fruit or large walnut. It is located anteriorly at the neck of the urethra and just below the urinary bladder and can be palpated during a digital rectal exam. The prostate gland produces the viscid secretion that constitutes the liquid portion of seminal fluid and is alkaline-based. The seminal fluid produced by the prostate is alkaline based in order to neutralize the acidity of the vaginal tract to prolong the life of the sperm in order to increase the odds of successful copulation. (wikipedia.org)

    What Causes Prostate Cancer?

    The etiology of prostate cancer is not completely certain. However, there are genetic factors which seem to be noted in families. In addition, diet may play a role and also certain races may be affected more than others. Interestingly, Asian men living in their native country tend to have a lower incidence of prostate cancer. In contrast, Asian men living in western developed countries and who adhere to a typical western diet appear to increase their risks of prostate cancer. A possible explanation for lowered prostate cancer risks may be linked to an Asian diet which is higher in vegetables and soy. Consumption of red meat (which is high in western diets) is linked to increased risks of prostate cancer. (videojug.com)

    Symptoms of Prostate Cancer

    In the early stages, prostate cancer may go unnoticed. However, as the disease progresses a man will experience either one or a myriad of symptoms. These symptoms include:
    • Difficulty urinating
    • Decreased flow of urine stream
    • Blood within urine
    • Blood within semen
    • Swelling of the lower extremities
    • Pain or discomfort within the pelvic bowl/area
    • Pain within the bones

    If a man has difficulty urinating he may simply have a benign enlargement of the prostate gland or a bacterial infection of the prostate. However, all the symptoms above experienced with bone pain can be an indication that the cancer has metastasized to other tissues such as the lymph nodes and bones. The method to detect any changes within the chemistry of the prostate is to have a blood draw to measure prostate specific antigen (PSA). If a PSA blood test indicates that levels are above normal levels a biopsy of the tissue may be performed in order to either diagnose or rule out cancer. (mayoclinic.com-symptoms)

    William (surname omitted or privacy) is a retired male who lives in the suburbs of Chicago. He will celebrate his seventy-fifth birthday in less than two months. He is reasonably active and spends the winter months in Florida to escape the harsh winters of the Midwest. He owns a trailer home in Florida which is where he lives during the winter. Because of his dual address he applied for health insurance through the state of Florida. He pays only fourteen dollars a month for his HMO coverage. Unfortunately, due to his insurance plan he is not covered outside the state of Florida. He did not anticipate having a second cancer after acquiring his new HMO insurance plan. He now wishes he had paid more money through his HMO to have coverage in the state of Illinois. This is a logical regret as Chicago is home to several cutting edge hospitals for cancer treatment. These include Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center, Northwestern Memorial Hospital and Cancer Centers of America.

    My uncle has only been diagnosed a month prior for prostate cancer (March 2011). His prostate cancer has been diagnosed using the Gleason Scale. Generally the method to diagnose cancer ranges from stage zero to four. State zero is the most un-invasive and generally implies that the cancer was caught very early. Stage four, in contrast, indicates the last stage of cancer and is a stage that is defined by highly advanced development and one that has usually metastasized. The Gleason Scale is a different method to measure the severity of cancer advancement and is only used for prostate cancer. The Gleason scale assigns a score rating from numbers one through ten. A Gleason Scale rating of one through four is considered the least dangerous and is more easily treatable. A scale rating of five through seven is considered an intermediate grade. Most men diagnosed with prostate cancer fall under this category. Lastly, a scale rating of eight to ten is considered the most advanced and the most difficult to treat. Reoccurrence of cancer cells is more common for men diagnosed at this staging (henryfordhealth.org).

    William has been diagnosed at a Gleason scale rating of six which is on the high end of intermediate. After performing the necessary tests no evidence of metastatic activity has been observed. His prognosis for prostate cancer will consist of radiation therapy received daily for a total of forty sessions which will span a period of eight weeks (once a day five times a week Monday through Friday). Treatment will commence within two weeks and each visit will last no more than several seconds. From the time he enters the radiology facility to the time he exits no more than seven to ten minutes will have passed. The majority of time spent receiving a radiology treatment involves proper placement and angling of equipment by the radiologist for correct exposure for the area to be treated.

    Common Side Effects of Radiation Therapy for Men with Prostate Cancer

    The effects of radiation therapy for prostate cancer can be painful and may also cause several long term problems. As previously noted, William will begin treatment shortly. He has no prior experience with treatment for cancer (other than removal of a cancerous kidney which did not require chemotherapy or radiation). Unfortunately he may experience pain that may range from mild to severe and affect surrounding tissues including the genitals and erectile functioning.

    One of the more common tissues to be affected for the treatment of prostate cancer is the rectum. Radiation for prostate cancer, more often than not, causes inflammation of the rectum and can cause painful bowel movements. Rectal bleeding may be observed and the aggravation of preexisting hemorrhoids is commonly observed in patients who receive prostate radiation. In less common circumstances stool incontinence may also occur. Prostatic radiation therapy may also cause permanent abnormal bowel functioning and according to the National Cancer Institute, there is an
  • MuchMoreThanM... Posts: 21492
    QUOTE Apr 02, 2011 12:33 AM GMT
    increased risk of rectal cancer.(livestrong.com).

    Sources also report that patients undergoing prostatic radiation therapy may suffer from diarrhea. However, this side effect typically disappears once treatment ceases. After the bowel tissue recovers from the effects of radiation patients may be able to anticipate normal bowel functioning (---).
    A third possible side effect from radiation treatment may be inflammation of the bladder. According to medical sources, inflammation of the bladder lining causes a frequent urge to urinate accompanied by pain during urination. Bleeding may also result from radiation treatment of the prostate and can be observed in the urine which may appear brown, red or pink. These symptoms usually discontinue after radiation treatment is complete. The National Cancer Institute asserts that patients who undergo prostatic radiation treatment may increase their chances of succumbing to bladder cancer also (---).

    Urinary incontinence is also a side effect from receiving radiation for prostate cancer. Incontinence as a result from receiving prostatic radiation may or may not be permanent. In some cases, men may experience a subtle dribble of urine loss whereas other patients may experience complete loss of control and total voiding of the urinary bladder. Uncontrolled voiding of the urinary bladder may be brought on by so much as a sneeze, a cough or simply by laughing. Men experiencing this side effect may be required to wear proper undergarments in order to avoid embarrassing moments while in a public setting. Fortunately, treatments for prostate cancer continue to improve which help more men to eventually regain full urinary control within time (webmd.com).

    Diminished or impaired erectile functioning is also a potential side effect of prostatic radiation treatment. Particularly, the occurrence of erectile dysfunction appears to increase over time after prostatic therapy is complete. A 2010 study published a report involving 394 men who completed internal radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Within six months fifteen percent of the subjects experienced erectile dysfunction. Notably, more than forty percent of men suffered from erectile dysfunction at five years post-treatment (www.livestrong.com).


    Hardships Faced By Those Who Interact with Sufferers of Prostate Cancer

    Generally speaking, most prostate cancer sufferers are older men who are already enjoying their retirement. However, there have been cases of men diagnosed with prostate cancer in their forties. Men in this age bracket are still usually plugging away within the workforce to financially support themselves. A working man who develops prostate cancer will more than likely need time away from work in order to fulfill his prognostic protocol. Scheduling a convenient time for daily prostatic radiation treatment is not always an option. Depending on geography and availability of appointment times, a prostate cancer sufferer will more than likely need time off from work. This might result in only working half days or taking a temporary leave of absence. Fortunately there are laws in place which prevent cancer sufferers from losing their job due to illness.

    With that being said, however, a cancer sufferer’s place of employment will have to procure alternatives in order to pick up the slack due to temporary absence. It may also be likely that the cancer sufferer’s time away from work is anticipated to be temporary. Depending on the nature of a man’s job position, the employer may request that the remaining employees share the absentee’s workload in order to pick up the slack. This may cause an elevated level of stress for other employees due to increased workload and possibly working longer hours than normal. An employer may be faced with having to exercise creativity in order to boost employee morale to keep employees happy and motivated.

    Men who fall within the typical age bracket (after the age of seventy) to develop prostate cancer, more often than not are already retired and may be able to more easily adhere to daily radiation treatments. Difficulties arise, however, as older men become less independent and need to rely on family members to help them keep daily medical treatments. If a man is not widowed he may be able to rely on his spouse in order to keep up with appointments. If a prostate sufferer has children he might be able to rely on them to help maintain the rigorous schedule necessary for radiation therapy. Unfortunately, this will cause a strain on family members as daily appointments can add to the existing stress of modern day living. One benefit of having children is that they will be able to help the parent in time of need. But typically, adult offspring have dependent children and lives of their own. So not only does the threat of paternal loss loom in the air but family members must also make accommodations in order to ensure survival.

    In addition to the stress associated with managing a rigorous schedule of daily appointments, the emotional stress experienced by loved once is substantial. Generally, when cancer is discovered that is all a doctor knows initially. However, determining staging and possible metastatic activity is not known until a later date. Upon receiving incomplete information, it is natural for people to fear the worst case scenario. Close family members and friends may experience bouts of depression and anxiety and fear. They will basically experience similar emotions that the prostate cancer sufferer is having. The ones most affected are the spouse and it may also be typical that a spouse feels helpless. Fortunately, man hospitals now offer support groups for prostate cancer sufferers and their spouses. In addition to being able to talk openly and express one’s self, hospitals are now providing both the sufferer and his spouse coping strategies in order to better handle the devastation of prostate cancer illness (webmd.com).

  • MuchMoreThanM... Posts: 21492
    QUOTE Apr 02, 2011 12:34 AM GMT
    Recommendations for Possible Prevention and Improvement

    Prevention


    Some people believe that if a man lives long enough that he will eventually succumb to prostate cancer. Although there might be some truth to this statement it is believed that lifestyle changes may help to delay or prevent prostate cancer. Two approaches in particular are through diet and exercise. The study of nutrition suggests that consumption of certain foods and the avoidance of others may help to decrease a man’s risk for prostate cancer. A diet high in fruit and vegetables and lower in saturated fats and red meat has been linked to lower incidences of cancer in general (www.mayoclinic.com).

    According to the Mayo-Clinic, possible diet recommendations to sustain prostate health and to avoid prostate cancer include:

    • Eat moderate sized meal portions in order to avoid obesity.

    • Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables and look for foods high in folate (B vitamin) which may help to decrease prostate cancer. Additionally, foods such as kale, cabbage and broccoli contain a nutrient called diindolylmethane which may help prevent prostate cancer also. Coincidentally, foods high in lycopene (such as tomatoes and other bright red fruits and vegetables may not have the preventative cancer fighting capacity as previously thought.

    • Reduce or eliminate refined sugars as cancer cells feed on refined sugar and allow them to flourish. In terms of grains, avoid processed white flour and choose whole wheat instead.

    • Significantly reduce or eliminate alcohol consumption as heavy alcoholic consumption has been linked to aggressive prostate cancer.

    • Diets low in Vitamin D have been linked to several different cancers. The Mayo-Clinic recommends to either supplement one’s diet with a good source of vitamin D or to increase consumption of foods high in vitamin D such as fish liver oil, cheeses and egg yolks.

    • Although results of studies are not yet conclusive, foods high in omega 3 fatty acids may also prove to be beneficial in the prevention of prostate cancer. Foods high in omega 3 fatty acids include salmon, mackerel, herring (just about all cold-water fatty fish) and flax seeds.

    • Adopting and maintaining an exercise regimen with regularity helps to control obesity and may assist in preventing cancer of the prostate. At least thirty minutes of aerobic exercise four times a week or more is recommended (www.mayoclinic.com).

    • Studies have correlated lower incidences of prostate cancer with more frequent ejaculatory emissions. The Journal of American Medical Association performed a study in 2004 and concluded that more than twelve ejaculations per month proved beneficial. The study found that more than three emissions weekly were correlated with a decrease in prostate cancer by fifteen percent (askmen.com).

    Counseling For the Patient and For Close Family

    Unfortunately, there will be people who follow the best dietary and exercise protocols who still succumb to illnesses such as cancer. For men, prostate cancer is the number two killer for American men with lung cancer taking first place. With that being said, prostate cancer caught early or prostate cancers that are not aggressive can be treated with high success rates. Living with cancer not only causes severe stress for the person with the illness, but it can also wreak emotional and psychological havoc for loved ones of the cancer patient. Fortunately there is support available for cancer sufferers and their loved ones which can provide coping strategies to improve quality of life (www.webmd.com).

    Not only does the stress of fighting cancer take its toll on men who are directly affected or their loved ones, but there are also other serious concerns. Patients who are diagnosed with cancer may be overwhelmed with treatments, medications and possible outcomes. And lastly, for those who do not have adequate health care coverage, a major illness can cause a significant financial strain. Many people without health care coverage can lose their home due to expensive cancer treatments and medical visits. Several recommendations to improve quality of life to cope with the stress include:

    • Social workers can help assist a cancer sufferer and family members. Social workers can provide pertinent information regarding diagnosis and treatment counseling and education for lifestyle adjustments and referrals for support groups. Social workers can also help patients acquire affordable temporary lodging (for those that need to travel long distances to receive treatment) and be able to act as a liaison for national agencies, community resources and other possible needs.

    • Individual counseling may be more appropriate when working with a social worker. If necessary, medications may be prescribed by a psychiatrist in order to deal with depression during times of illness. A psychiatrist will be able to prescribe the appropriate medication that will not interfere with a cancer prognosis.

    • Joining a support group can be beneficial for both the patient and family members. Properly guided support groups can provide an environment that will enable a person to embrace new coping strategies. Also, other members of the group may be able to provide their own life experience that are more relate-able and strength may be more easily obtained by knowing that there are others experiencing similar hardships. Sometimes, knowing that you are not alone can make a tremendous difference.

    • Financial counselors are generally available during normal hospital business hours and can help to provide information regarding medical expenses. They can assist with drawing up payment plans, assist in obtaining financial assistance and can answer questions related to medical expenses. (---).
  • MuchMoreThanM... Posts: 21492
    QUOTE Apr 02, 2011 12:35 AM GMT
    Conclusion

    Although prostate cancer directly attacks men, it can be a devastating illness that also affects close family members, friends and cohorts. The worst case scenario is death as cancer can be a killer. However, even if a person survives prostate cancer many aspects of his life will change. He may lose control of certain parts of his body and may not likely be able to perform sexually. This can have a significant impact on a man’s ego. Treatments for successful eradication of prostate cancer can potentially increase risks for other types of cancer affecting surrounding tissues. The best approach to potentially avoid or at least postpone the advent of prostate cancer is to adhere to a healthy diet and lifestyle habits. In addition, men over the age of forty should work closely with their doctor to be screened regularly for prostate cancer in order to treat any concerns as expediently as possible. And if a man should unfortunately develop prostate cancer he owes it to himself to seek the best medical care possible to ensure his chances for effective treatment and survival. Effective treatment entails working with his medical professionals to decide on the best possible prognosis as well as working with counselors on a need be basis in order to exercise the best coping strategies during and post treatment.

    Bibliography

    Ask Men – Become a Better Man. (2011). Four Fun Ways to Prevent Prostate Cancer. Accessed February 2011 from: http://www.askmen.com/sports/health_400/410_4-fun-ways-to-prevent-prostate-cancer.html

    Henry Ford Health System. (2011). Prostate Cancer Grading and Staging. Prostate Cancer Grading. Accessed February 2011 from: http://www.henryfordhealth.org/body.cfm?id=39165

    Live Strong Foundation. (2011). Lance Armstrong Foundation. Prostate Cancer Radiation Treatment Side Effects. Accessed February 2011 from: http://www.livestrong.com/article/126015-prostate-cancer-radiation-treatment-side/

    Mayo Clinic. (2011). Prostate Cancer. Symptoms. Accessed February 2011 from: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/prostate-cancer/DS00043/DSECTION=symptoms

    Mayo Clinic. (2011). Prostate Cancer. What You Can Do. Accessed February 2011 from: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/prostate-cancer-prevention/MC00027

    Mayo Clinic. (2011). Urinary Incontinence. Causes. Accessed February 2011 from: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/urinary- incontinence/DS00404/DSECTION=causes

    Video Jug – Get Good At Life. (2011). How Does Prostate Cancer Develop? Accessed February 2011 from: http://www.videojug.com/expertanswer/prostate-cancer-risk-factors-2/how-does-prostate-cancer-develop

    WebMD ® Better Information. Better Health. (2011). How Advanced Prostate Cancer Affects the Family. Accessed from:
    http://www.webmd.com/prostate-cancer/guide/prostate-cancer-family-impact

    WebMD ® Better Information. Better Health. (2011). Prostate Cancer. Urinary Incontinence. Accessed February 2011 from: http://www.webmd.com/urinary-incontinence-oab/mens-guide/urinary-incontinence

    Wikipedia – The Free Encyclopedia. (2011). Prostate. Accessed February 2011 from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prostate



  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Apr 02, 2011 12:41 AM GMT
    Dont omit mentioning the relative finger length and testosterone exposure in the womb vis-a-vis prostate cancer.

    "...The relative length of index and ring fingers is set before birth, and is thought to relate to the levels of sex hormones the baby is exposed to in the womb. Less testosterone equates to a longer index finger; the researchers now believe that being exposed to less testosterone before birth helps protect against prostate cancer later in life. The phenomenon is thought to occur because the genes HOXA and HOXD control both finger length and development of sex organs. ..."

    http://www.newsucanuse.org/content/finger-length-points-prostate-cancer-risk
  • Tordoggy Posts: 1
    QUOTE May 02, 2011 1:04 AM GMT
    An original question on this thread was: when the prostate was removed, would there be any feeling in that area? Later restated: “..very interested to know if anal sex will ever be enjoyable [following RP]. I’m anxious to get to the Yahoo group myself, but in advance of that, here’s my experience… I'm 52 and had RP 3 mths ago. So far has been, I’ve found that it can be more pleasurable than before. I learned elsewhere that a "new" set of nerves get linked up in body in the area where prostate used to exist. Some may be part of the nerve bundle servicing the bladder sphincter which controls the passing of urine. The combination in the ejaculation makes it feel as an orgasm. Thus, orgasmic sensation does not require a prostate. It would have been so nice to hear pre-surgery, from someone who had been through it, that this pleasant news was possible. I have also been experiencing “climacturia” (urine on climax), with multiple and extended climaxes that go on for several minutes. Now I have a new use for condoms.
  • john0089 Posts: 1
    QUOTE Oct 23, 2011 12:58 PM GMT
    any problem regarding your penis will be solve at http://tinyurl.com/3derf25