Vets and Active Duty Military -- Speak out !!!

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    Nov 07, 2009 5:25 PM GMT
    What do you want, or hope for from the public, your family, your friends when you come home, or when your active in the military? What is most helpful ? Do you just want friendship, friendliness? Do you just want to be left alone? Do you sometimes feel that offers of friendship, a helping hand comes off as pain in the ass do-gooders? What can we do for you? We all appreciate your serving for us. So tell us what you think, and the rest of us lets listen and offer thanks if your so minded.
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    Nov 07, 2009 6:14 PM GMT
    realifedad said What do you want, or hope for from the public, your family, your friends when you come home, or when your active in the military? What is most helpful ? Do you just want friendship, friendliness? Do you just want to be left alone? Do you sometimes feel that offers of friendship, a helping hand comes off as pain in the ass do-gooders? What can we do for you? We all appreciate your serving for us. So tell us what you think, and the rest of us lets listen and offer thanks if your so minded.

    I never expected anything. I did it for me, not for them.

    I get mostly scorn & abuse from RJers here regarding my 25 years in uniform, and also in person. Not too long ago a prominent Republican attorney sarcastically addressed me a "Colonel" at the dinner table in the most mocking tone, again & again. He never served a day himself, but he thought he was entitled to put me down. Odd how Republicans feel they have the right to send others into combat, but not themselves, and then denigrate & fail to support those they've sent.

    It's what we of the Vietnam era have come to expect. We were spit on 40 years ago, and today it's not much better. Brave words, but just talk, especially from the deceitful Republicans. Veterans are forgotten like they've always been. Dying for your country is convenient, but being disabled is just an inconvenience.
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    Nov 07, 2009 7:27 PM GMT
    I've never seen anyone scorn those who serve or have served. Even down here in the south for the past half year being active military is a source of pride.

    I'm suspicious of anyone who claims society looks down on vets or active service personel. Forgetten by elected leaders sometimes but that's it.
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    Nov 07, 2009 7:32 PM GMT
    You guys from the Vietnam era did for sure have a rough time with public reaction when you returned that's for sure. it was like the public was so against the war that they took it out on the vets themselves. Through years as director/manager of Government subsidized housing I have had many a revealing conversation with vets going back to the 2nd world war, it was like night and day the difference between how the two different war vets were treated, and the troubles they seemed to have. I'll never forget the stories of one 2nd world war vet about D-day and how his unit were received once they got inland. One day after several such conversations he came in my office with an envelope and gave me several things he found as he went through some villages in Belgium and Holland. I'll always cherish those things.
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    Nov 07, 2009 7:38 PM GMT
    Hey Red Vespa, we certainly feel you and other vets deserve much for what you did. This morning while out shopping we ran into an exPOW from WW2.

    His license plate also said EXPOW. My Uncle was one. Tremendous respect is a pretty mild description of how we both feel about vets.

  • Menergy_1

    Posts: 737

    Nov 07, 2009 9:32 PM GMT
    As a retired USAF officer, I can attest to the earlier scorn and denigration of us who had been in the military and re-entered civilian life trying to move on with our carerrs during the Vietnam and just post-Vietnam period.

    Despite a college degree and 4 years at that point of active duty managerial training and duties (with outstanding ratings, by the way), I was frequently faced with attitudes of "Well, besides getting a degree, what else have you done?" while the job interviewer was looking at my resume with the experience as an officer right there on paper.... I would explain I had managed x number of staff, doing all sorts of analyses and decision making for my own office and advising/making recommendations for actions by the exeuctive-level officers, and all sorts of other "managerment" duties.

    Then the guy would repeat, "Yes, but what else besides getting a college degree have you done? You didn't "manage" - you were an officer and you gave orders and if you weren't obeyed, you court-martialled your subordinates..." I refuted that that was perhaps the "old days/brown shoe days" but it doesn't work that way now. One has to elicit performance, train staff, lead, and too many courts martial will reflect on the officer at some point, resulting in relief from duty. Management of military staff is not that much different (although not exactly the same as business of course) from general management, projects, goals and reviews, constant improvement hopefully, etc.

    After 8 months of that sort of thing I became disgusted and wound up applying for and beginning work in a great federal civil service career that lasted 34 years -- using those management skills I'd learned and using my own logic, perspectives, leadership, planning and personnel skills pretty well to advance to a moderately high position both in regional and national offices. And I stayed in the Reserves during those years, and I'm glad I did.

    So today? I'm sure up until recently the men and women volunteering and serving in our military have been supported much more than in the 60's and 70's -- especially after 9/11 and so on. But there is also now much more sentiment for many reasons to get out of two wars and bring our troops home; that could lead to some unexpected side effects on how people in uniform are seen/regarded if public feelings shift about the US military actions and those participating in them.

    The South has always been friendly to the military -- it's a tradition and often one of the few roads open to many southern guys (especially) to have a career if good civilian jobs are scarce. I know there's a huge amount of southern accents in the military! lol
  • Akula

    Posts: 130

    Nov 08, 2009 4:46 AM GMT
    As an active duty Army soldier and now in the Reserves I've never been bad mouthed or scorned by anyone, as a matter of fact I've had my lunch paid for as well as being thanked for my service while getting gas or just walking around while in uniform. I've even been thanked the couple times I've been in Seattle while in uniform even though people like to say the liberals in Seattle don't like military people which is very wrong. But of course you will always have the loud mouths that get on the news and make a lot of people look bad but thats with anything.
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    Nov 08, 2009 5:12 AM GMT
    To all the Veterans on here, THANK YOU!

    Reallifedad, great topic. I've wondered those questions too, I think many of us have.

    The topic seems to have turned to "scorned or not" though. How about the origional questions guys. We want to support you, what is the best way?

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    Nov 08, 2009 6:23 AM GMT
    Hmm well I don't think of myself as a "Hero" so I don't expect much from the public other than the respect. All people in uniform deserve especially if they are risking their lives, so things are better for you.

    I've had people who don't agree with the war, say some pretty nasty things to me or friends. I myself didn't let it get to me, because some people out there are garbage and I wasn't there for them.

    It is a bit annoying when I hear silly civilians, mostly young. Sit back and talk as if they know whats going on overseas. They get all their info from wankers who have no clue, and they believe it as truth because he or she shares the same ideology.

    That's nothing that can be changed though, people have the right to say stupid things heh. They don't matter to me, the ones who do are the people I served with, and the ones who appreciate our service. I'm never a grump when I get a handshake or hug from someone, its always nice. I do the same whenever I run into someone who has served in wars before me.

    I do feel bad for a lot of the vets who get slow help for their problems. I know one guy on here I used to chat with has issues with his PTSD. A lot of the help for him has been slow, its been the same for me. I knew a guy who had flipped out on someone, he went to prison and got abused in there and ended up killing himself. That actually scared me, because he thought I was in a worse situation, so I was afraid I'd maybe end up the same. It also made me angry that everything was so slow for him.

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    Nov 08, 2009 5:52 PM GMT
    Its hard to wrap my mind around why our system to help Veterans through the VA had failed in helping guys with PTSD as they have in the past. I understand that there was a loud outcry several years ago that brought a lot of attention to the subject of giving better assistance to those with PTSD, is it better now than say 2 years ago? We should all open our hearts and ears to these guys. A lot of us don't agree with our governments reasoning behind some of these wars, but that needn't be an issue coming between us and the soldier who gave up part of his/her life for the benefit of our country. Many of these soldiers have paid a dear price affecting the rest of their lives. I hope some of you guys on here that suffer from PTSD or any other physical ailments from the war, will accept our open arms to you and from people who are living around you and more directly involved in your lives. While none of us can totally understand how you feel because we haven't been in your shoes, our hands out to you soldiers can offer at least support and genuine friendship to listen to and alleviate going it alone. US citizens have a lot to be thankful for from the efforts of our veterans.