Resume Help

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 08, 2009 3:09 AM GMT
    Hey everyone,

    It may have been posted before (not sure), but could anyone give me some good tips on making my look the very best it can. I'm applying for a very important job and want to make sure I do everything correctly. Thanks so much!
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    Nov 08, 2009 3:47 AM GMT
    I just was interviewed last week and the interviewer said one of the reasons he was interviewing me was because I knew how to write a resume.

    I have just updated my resume following the guidelines on Careerbuilders.com. "they aint writing resumes like they used to" I can tell you that.

    http://www.careerbuilder.com/JobSeeker/Resources/CareerResources.aspx?sc_cmp2=JS_Nav_CarRes

    Scroll down to the bottom of this page and you will see "Cover Letters and Resumes." There are a lot of articles there. Pick the ones that look most interesting to you.

    Good luck
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    Nov 08, 2009 4:52 AM GMT
    running11 saidHey everyone,

    It may have been posted before (not sure), but could anyone give me some good tips on making my look the very best it can. I'm applying for a very important job and want to make sure I do everything correctly. Thanks so much!


    Check your spelling
    Use a font like Verdana
    From the job you are applying for try to enculcate some of the words into your resume
    Use lots of action words
    Try to not use buzzwords.
    Most recruiters prefer a chronologically based resume
    Try not to pad. People can usually see thru this
    Be honest
    Check your spelling
    If you can quantify some of your accomplishment do so
    If you need space get rid of the line - References will be furnished on request". It is understood that they will be.
    Check your spelling

    These are the basics - each recruiter has his or her preference beyond this.
  • jrs1

    Posts: 4388

    Nov 08, 2009 4:52 AM GMT
    you're adorable ... put that on your résumé ...
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    Nov 08, 2009 5:00 AM GMT
    It really depends on what sort of job it is and who is going to review the resume. You may need to have half a dozen completely different ones prepared. Something that would appeal to an HR flunky will be almost completely opposite to one that would impress a technical group leader, for example.
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    Nov 08, 2009 5:14 AM GMT
    jprichva said
    Blackguy4you saidMost recruiters prefer a chronologically based resume.

    As a former headhunter, I agree with everything Blackguy4you said...

    ...except this one. The most effective resumes highlight any jobs or education that are relevant for the job being sought. This information should be the first thing the recruiter sees.

    I had to tell everyone I recruited to remember one simple thing:
    A resume is NOT a personal history. It is a display ad for yourself. That's all it is.

    And under NO circumstances include "References available on request." It's the sort of thing that makes you look like a kid.


    What about "References furnished upon request?" >.>
    -------
    Once you have written it have someone else check it for errors- grammatical- spelling- etc. You can sometimes overlook minor things.... It's happened to me before...
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    Nov 08, 2009 5:23 AM GMT
    Everyone,

    Thank you so much for all the help. I greatly appreciate it, and I will put it to good use.

    icon_biggrin.gif
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    Nov 08, 2009 6:34 AM GMT
    . . . learn as much as you can about the organization/company before you submit your resume and especially before your interview . . . and be very nice to the receptionist . . .
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    Nov 08, 2009 6:49 AM GMT
    I'll reiterate what has already been mentioned…ensure your spelling and punctuation is flawless.

    I typically throw away (by than I mean delete the candidate’s resume from my e-mail) when I find spelling errors that Microsoft Word spell check would have caught.

    Anyway good luck and remember to sell yourself.
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    Nov 08, 2009 6:53 AM GMT
    Spell out why you fit the job and vice versa. When I was hiring assistants, noone said why they were a match for the job until the girl I hired put her resume in. My research project involves sport, and she is a runner. It made her stand out from a rather lame ass pool of candidates.
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    Nov 08, 2009 7:01 AM GMT
    I agree with noren about being pleasant to the receptionist!

    Great stuff from blackguy.

    Also can't stress the connecting or dropping in words/phrases that fit the job you are applying for enough!

    One other thing (as if you don't have enough to think about) is the layout. Be sure not to cram everything together and let there be plenty of whitespace. Doing so allows the eye to move across what you put down and will generally be more pleasing to the reader. (And hopefully will rise above the rest of the applicants'.)

    Good luck!

    PS - One great tool I found is to set up a few base resumes and then tailor them to each application. If applying online I suggest saving and sending the finished resume as a pdf document, so it can't be messed with by any one.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Nov 08, 2009 7:25 AM GMT
    Employers usually take just a few seconds to visually scan a resume for something relevant that jumps out at them.
    They never read every word of it.

    Use bullet points, not complete sentences.

    Try to keep it to just one page, unless you're applying for a high ranking position.

    Use plain white paper, black ink, and a font large enough so that it's very easy to read.
    That may sound obvious, but some people have been known to use colored paper, colored ink, and flowers all around the border, because they wanted their resume to stand out. Well, it certainly did stand out, as unprofessional.
  • jrs1

    Posts: 4388

    Nov 08, 2009 1:18 PM GMT

    harvard res & cov letter:
    http://www.law.harvard.edu/current/careers/opia/landing-your-job/resumes/index.html

    UMichigan res builder:
    https://umich.optimalresume.com/

    although for business majors, there are some features that you may find useful here:
    http://businessmajors.about.com/od/sampleresumes/Sample_Application_Resumes.htm

  • tbone25

    Posts: 144

    Nov 08, 2009 2:27 PM GMT
    A couple thoughts... Make sure that the resume looks good -- it is readable, things are tabbed and line up well without too many tabs... keep some free space on the page as well.

    Have references on the resume, and if you want have additional references available -- and have them with you when you interview.


    In the interview, when they ask you, "Could you do ... so and so." Don't say, "I think I can do it." That is our natural response to things like that. Instead say, "I'm confident that I can do it." Even if they are asking you about something you have never done before or have never really considered before.... You are confident that you could do it.

    Self Confidence is not often expressed in our conversations... it has to be in an interview.
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    Nov 08, 2009 2:55 PM GMT
    I would agree with almost everything that's been said here, but I have a few different takes on things.

    * Write in the style of the people who are going to read it. Nobody's taken a course on how to read a resume.

    * You don't need to list everything about yourself; just the things that the people reading it need to know. The resume isn't about you; it's about what the reader needs to know about you. You could be the best flamenco guitarist in the world, but I don't need to know that if I don't need a guitarist.

    * Make sure that I get the same impression of you from reading your resume that I get when I meet you. If there's a disconnect, I'll be confused.

    * Not everything has to be bulleted, but not everything should be in a paragraph either. Mix things up and make sure that whatever formats you use serve to make it easier for me to find out what are the things you have that would make me want to work with you. (Pet peeve of mine is having everything bulleted: since a bullet is about showing something is special, they lose there bunch if everything is bulleted or "special".)

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    Nov 08, 2009 3:25 PM GMT
    Webster666 saidEmployers usually take just a few seconds to visually scan a resume for something relevant that jumps out at them.
    They never read every word of it.

    Use bullet points, not complete sentences.

    Try to keep it to just one page, unless you're applying for a high ranking position.

    Use plain white paper, black ink, and a font large enough so that it's very easy to read.
    That may sound obvious, but some people have been known to use colored paper, colored ink, and flowers all around the border, because they wanted their resume to stand out. Well, it certainly did stand out, as unprofessional.


    I can confirm everything Webster666 said. But then I work in engineering. If you're applying for work in a more creative arts type of field, it might be different.

    One thing you might want to indicate - probably during the interview, not on the resume - is if you're flexible. For example, are you willing to travel for extended periods, or re-locate, if needed. Or if you're willing to put in 50 or 60 hour weeks every now and then, when needed. This is a big consideration in my company when they consider hiring someone new. They've had problems with "high maintenance" people in the past who weren't willing to be team players, and instead tried to make everybody else on the team work around their personal schedule.
  • MikePhilPerez

    Posts: 4357

    Nov 08, 2009 3:55 PM GMT
    Keep the BS out of it. Too many people put stuff in their resumes that they never done. And that is why there are so many people in jobs that haven't a clue what they are doing. Be proud of what is in your resume.
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    Nov 08, 2009 4:23 PM GMT
    There are some amazing comments above, especially the UMICH resumé reference- go blue! I was recently promoted/hired at the University.

    Research research research! Know the org./company and build you're entire resumé package around your skills/experiences that support or compliment that company. They're most likely looking for a person who brings a fresh perspective to the position at question.

    Have a vision for the position and ask the interviewer about their vision- It's always good to bring up the warm and fuzzies near the end of the interview.

    If you can, use a design program to create your resumé. ie Adobe InDesign or Illustrator etc. Avoid Comic Sans, Papyrus like the plague! I like to use san-serif fonts for headings and serif fonts for body information. The combination has real visual interest. Serif fonts are the easiest to read when in small point size.

    Avoid colors, images and weird personalized stationary. Remember that your resumé will most likely be photocopied, so strong contrast and simplicity goes further. Great graphic design starts with text and space.

    Please avoid the bi-fold, #10 envelope approach- it's soo dated! Aim for a nice document mailer and if possible print your resumé and coverletter on around 80lb coverstock. Look at paper finishes. You might laugh, but a huge part of our memory is based on tactility.

    Good luck! ;-)





  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 08, 2009 4:35 PM GMT
    oh just win the lottery and fuck the whole thing .... icon_rolleyes.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 15, 2009 3:14 AM GMT
    Caslon12000 saidoh just win the lottery and fuck the whole thing .... icon_rolleyes.gif


    Haha, I'll be sure to let you know if that happens. But until then, thank you all for the advice. It has helped so much.