Just ran my first race (10K)!

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    Nov 09, 2009 6:43 PM GMT
    I've been working out at the gym for a long time, but just started running about 3 weeks ago. I finished my first 10K over the weekend in under 51½ minutes. I wore my heart rate monitor, and it was really pumping (180-185bpm) during the last mile of the race--part of that was probably from the adrenaline. My goal was to finish under an hour, so I'm pretty happy with my results. I feel a bit sore today, but managed to jog an easy 3.5 miles this morning.

    My ultimate goal is to do the PF Chang's Rock & Roll 1/2 marathon in January, and it would be great if I could keep it under 2 hours. My primary concern is with losing muscle mass, so I've been doing my regular workout (cardio+weight training) on my non-running days. Hopefully I can keep that training regiment up.

    I never thought I'd be able to do distance running because of prior knee injuries, but I really enjoyed my first race. Having gone through that experience, I now have a huge amount of respect for runners. I think I might just be hooked!

    I'm following this training schedule for my running. Does it seem pretty decent? Any other advice for meeting my goal in January?
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    Nov 09, 2009 8:56 PM GMT
    that program sounds pretty good.
    and congratulations on your first race. That was pretty ambitious for just 3 weeks of running but you did very well obviously.
    i find the bitch in racing is pacing yourself ( except for 5k where it's simple, you just go all out ) . I've done only one 1/2 marathon so i can't really offer genuine advice, my favs remaining 5 and 10k's .

    [the following are only my own opinions based on personal experience.
    possibly debatable to specialists. ]

    following programs:
    I find them a tad constraining so i end up following the rough outlines .
    There are tons of programs and regimen but they usually end up saying more or less the same things with mixed bags of intervals, hills, long distance, easy rides, fartlek, off days etc.
    but
    also important is to vary the style of running, changing where you put stress on joints, tendons and muscles.
    ex: stride, hip rotation, arm positions and movements, how much you lift each leg, standing straight or leaning slightly forward , breathing synchronization ,

    if you have access to trails, it's a big relief to the feet and legs to run on softer ground , alternating it with hard surfaces. ( i try to avoid sidewalks as much as possible.. worst surface ever ).

    what type of shoes do you wear ? over pronation, neutral , under pronation ( more rare) ?do you like a cushy ride or firmer sole ? how much mileage do you put on them ?
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    Nov 09, 2009 9:12 PM GMT
    Awesome! congrats. I can do the 5k's, but need to step it up to 10k.
  • zakariahzol

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    Nov 09, 2009 11:09 PM GMT
    Remarkable for the first time. I run 10k all the times, and I hardly come close to your time. But I am not as well shape as you and I am not trying to break any record or anything. Just enjoying the run and the spirit of running with other people.
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    Nov 09, 2009 11:27 PM GMT
    Congratulations on your race! That's a very good time for your first. I know what you mean about getting hooked on it...

    If you're worried about losing muscle mass, have you considered dropping cardio from your regular workout and just doing weights on gym days, then getting outdoors and running on your other days?
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    Nov 09, 2009 11:47 PM GMT
    Good time for a first race on very limited mileage! Can't wait to see what you'll do with a little more training. Keep us posted and good luck in the next one.


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    Nov 10, 2009 6:38 AM GMT
    According to McMillan's running calculator, you have the speed to break 2:00. The training program looks good too. As you gain more experience you should be able to fly.

    I wouldn't worry too much about losing mass...you probably just need to up your protein and your amino acid intake after your workouts, including your runs/cross training sessions.
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    Nov 10, 2009 7:13 PM GMT
    Thanks all! Two weeks ago I purchased a pair of Nike running shoes (forget the model, don't have them with me), and have been breaking them in. They are a more supportive type according to the salesperson, and I really like them so far. I'm hoping I won't get any blisters, but we'll see when I start doing more distance. I've been doing most of my training runs on the treadmill, because I like how it forces me to keep a certain pace (which I think helped during the 10K).

    I did my first regular workout (since the race) this morning, and had to dial down the crossramp a notch because my legs still felt a bit sore. I was able to complete the rest of my workout without any problems though. I thought about dropping the cardio from my regular workouts, but I enjoy doing the crossramp and think it might be hard to get back into it if/when I should stop running. So I'll see how it goes, and make adjustments accordingly.

    One big side effect of adding running to my routine is that I'm hungry all the time now. I used to eat just a decent sized lunch and a small dinner, but now I'm eating breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snacks. I've already gained 3lbs! I hope some of it is muscle, and that my weight will stabilize once my body gets used to the extra activity.

    Anyway, thanks for the encouragement/advice and I'll you all know how I do.
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    Dec 22, 2009 4:16 PM GMT
    Congratulations on your first race. Your about were I was the first time - 27 years ago. If you keep at it I bet you will find it quite addicting.

    My advice is to use the plan as a guide. If you're scheduled for a long run and you don't feel up to it, put it off a day.

    The race is only 3 weeks away. How goes the training?
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    Jan 17, 2010 11:43 PM GMT
    UPDATE: I finished my 1/2 marathon in 1:51 (McMillan's Running Calculator predicted 1:54). I was nervous because I missed a few runs (right after the 10K, and then the 11 mile run) due to foot pain/issues. I got checked out by the doctor, and luckily nothing was broken, so I continued cautiously and felt pretty good on race day.

    Training on the treadmill helped me tremendously as it enabled me to run faster outdoors, and also allowed me to avoid the impact of hard pavement. I'm glad I decided to walk through all the water stations, because it let my legs recover and run faster. When I approached the finish, I was passing tired runners who had passed by me earlier.

    Interestingly enough, my 10K split time was exactly the same as the 10K that I ran back in November. My overall pace was 8:30, which I'm very pleased with, considering that I only started running in October.

    I'm glad to have completed this goal! icon_smile.gif
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    Jan 20, 2010 11:38 AM GMT
    nphx72 saidWhen I approached the finish, I was passing tired runners who had passed by me earlier.

    Interestingly enough, my 10K split time was exactly the same as the 10K that I ran back in November. My overall pace was 8:30, which I'm very pleased with, considering that I only started running in October.

    icon_smile.gif


    Fantastic! All very good signs. The passing at the end shows that in comparison to those folks, you ran a smart race. And the fact that you matched your 10K time from only two months ago in the middle of a half marathon says a lot about how you're progressing.

    Eager to hear how the next one goes.