question for therapists

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 09, 2009 10:47 PM GMT
    I have, for a long time, wanted to learn some body or energy work modality. One strong possibility is shiatsu or chinese acupressure, and I am attracted to something like Rolfing (though i have never had it in its pure form)... or some sort of fascia release work.

    What I was wondering is (1) does anyone have a modality that they find amazing or want to recommend and (2) therapists: is what you do demanding on your body? I donĀ“t think it would be wise to do something that needed a lot of force through my hands.

    What have you found techiques or schools that really have many good tools?
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    Nov 10, 2009 1:40 AM GMT
    jprichva saidHm, remind me....what is the sound a duck makes?

    Quack? I just wish a duck could translate the OP, cause making sense of it is beyond my limited ability. icon_confused.gif
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    Nov 10, 2009 1:55 AM GMT
    Lostboy, you need to find yourself a quality school that teaches massage or bodywork. Generally during the initial training you will be exposed to a wide variety of bodywork modalities -- Swedish, deep tissue, cranial sacral, reflexology, shiatsu, accupressure, sports massage, etc. as well as anatomy, pathology, kinesiology, and other related areas. Once you have a basic level of training, you will more than likely find an area or two that appeals to you and your career plans and then you can get more advanced training or certifications. If you are drawn to Rolfing (Structural Integration), you will likely be best served by getting your basic massage training first and then applying at the Rolf Institute in Boulder.

    I myself specialize in bodywork for the athletic community. I use a variety of modalities to meet the needs of my clients, but I do tend to use more deep tissue and Structural Integration techniques. Is the work physically demanding? Yes, it can be, but if your school trains you well, you will have proper body mechanics which will allow you to do your job without sacrificing your body. I do roughly 130 sessions per month and am in the best shape of my life.
  • Celticmusl

    Posts: 4330

    Nov 10, 2009 5:28 AM GMT
    I enjoyed being a guinea pig for those studying Reiki about ten years ago. Seemed to help general aches and pain, and my allergies for some reason.
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    Nov 10, 2009 8:11 AM GMT
    jprichva saidHm, remind me....what is the sound a duck makes?


    It always sounded like "fuck fuck fuck off" to me icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Nov 11, 2009 9:48 AM GMT
    I need to be rolfed ;)

    matt_f_b1_a10.jpg

    matt_l_b1_a10.jpg
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    Jan 08, 2010 2:44 PM GMT
    It's much more involved than just putting a hand on someones body. The first thing you need to learn are the basic movements, effleurage, petrissage, etc..then you HAVE to learn correct posture so that you don't wreck your body, ruin your arms and hands, then you'll have to learn every muscle of the body, where it attaches, what it's action is, how to get to the muscle if it's deep to another muscle, where the bony landmarks are etc..., then you'll have to learn structural mechanics, then you learn pathology, then you learn eastern thoughts on meridians...once you have most of this down you can start on some of the modalities like shiatsu, Russian, Swedish, Cranial Sacral, Refleology, accupressure just to name a few....Without proper training you can do serious damage to someone, ie, someone has varicose veins and you start dooing deep tissue work over the area and you can possibly cause a blood clot to be released, not good....
    If you just wana do fluff and buffs try checking out utube