Texas

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    Nov 15, 2009 3:00 AM GMT
    As a whole whats the attatude to homosexuality in Texas:

    Not only do my family have old roots in Australia we have them in the US of A too, on both sides of the family. Just outside of Houston is a Town called Pattison. this come to be from land my family were to donate, thus it has one of my family name.
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    Nov 15, 2009 5:17 AM GMT
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    Nov 15, 2009 5:22 AM GMT
    Sodomy was against the law in Texas until the Supreme Court (in 2003) ruled such laws unconstitutional (Lawrence v. Texas). That should tell you something. Also, Texas currently has no laws protecting sexual orienation for employment discrimination.
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    Nov 15, 2009 5:32 AM GMT
    phemt saidSodomy was against the law in Texas until the Supreme Court (in 2003) ruled such laws unconstitutional (Lawrence v. Texas). That should tell you something. Also, Texas currently has no laws protecting sexual orienation for employment discrimination.


    Wow 2003, that does tell me alot, and they are now behind Utah too, this is a surprise.

    I hope they don'y play banjos in Texas.
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    Nov 15, 2009 5:45 AM GMT
    Pattison said
    phemt saidSodomy was against the law in Texas until the Supreme Court (in 2003) ruled such laws unconstitutional (Lawrence v. Texas). That should tell you something. Also, Texas currently has no laws protecting sexual orienation for employment discrimination.


    Wow 2003, that does tell me alot, and they are now behind Utah too, this is a surprise.

    I hope they don'y play banjos in Texas.


    Utah had Sodomy laws at the time also. Several states had sodomy laws until the 2003 Supreme Court ruling making void all such laws. Illinois was the first state to end its sodomy laws in 1962. Illinois also protects sexual orientation from emplolyment discrimination. Neither Texas or Utah protects sexual orientation from employment discrimation. It is true that Salt Lake City recently passed Sexual orienation protection, but that is just for that city and not the state. Several Texas cities protect sexual orientation for employment discrimation: Austin, Fort Worth, Houston, Dallas, and El Paso. I am not sure what you mean that Texas is behind Utah?
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    Nov 15, 2009 5:56 AM GMT
    phemt said
    Pattison said
    phemt saidSodomy was against the law in Texas until the Supreme Court (in 2003) ruled such laws unconstitutional (Lawrence v. Texas). That should tell you something. Also, Texas currently has no laws protecting sexual orienation for employment discrimination.


    Wow 2003, that does tell me alot, and they are now behind Utah too, this is a surprise.

    I hope they don'y play banjos in Texas.


    Utah had Sodomy laws at the time also. Several states had sodomy laws until the 2003 Supreme Court ruling making void all such laws. Illinois was the first state to end its sodomy laws in 1962. Illinois also protects sexual orientation for employment discrimination. Neither Texas or Utah protects sexual orientation from employment discrimination. It is true that Salt Lake City recently passed Sexual orientation protection, but that is just for that city and not the state. I am not sure what you mean that Texas is behind Utah?


    I meant Utah now had laws protection homosexuals in housing and employment, and Texas is still to do so. But as you just told me it's only salt Lake City. Thats hard for me to get my head around, because if my City in Oz got a right, so would the rest of the state; I belive.
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    Nov 15, 2009 6:00 AM GMT
    Pattison said
    phemt said
    Pattison said
    phemt saidSodomy was against the law in Texas until the Supreme Court (in 2003) ruled such laws unconstitutional (Lawrence v. Texas). That should tell you something. Also, Texas currently has no laws protecting sexual orienation for employment discrimination.


    Wow 2003, that does tell me alot, and they are now behind Utah too, this is a surprise.

    I hope they don'y play banjos in Texas.


    Utah had Sodomy laws at the time also. Several states had sodomy laws until the 2003 Supreme Court ruling making void all such laws. Illinois was the first state to end its sodomy laws in 1962. Illinois also protects sexual orientation for employment discrimination. Neither Texas or Utah protects sexual orientation from employment discrimination. It is true that Salt Lake City recently passed Sexual orientation protection, but that is just for that city and not the state. I am not sure what you mean that Texas is behind Utah?


    I meant Utah now had laws protection homosexuals in housing and employment, and Texas is still to do so. But as you just told me it's only salt Lake City. Thats hard for me to get my head around, because if my City in Oz got a right, so would the rest of the state; I belive.


    Note: I edited my post to include cities in Texas protecting Sexual orientation from employment discrimation.
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    Nov 15, 2009 4:03 PM GMT
    phemt said
    Pattison said
    phemt said
    Pattison said
    phemt saidSodomy was against the law in Texas until the Supreme Court (in 2003) ruled such laws unconstitutional (Lawrence v. Texas). That should tell you something. Also, Texas currently has no laws protecting sexual orienation for employment discrimination.


    Wow 2003, that does tell me alot, and they are now behind Utah too, this is a surprise.

    I hope they don'y play banjos in Texas.


    Utah had Sodomy laws at the time also. Several states had sodomy laws until the 2003 Supreme Court ruling making void all such laws. Illinois was the first state to end its sodomy laws in 1962. Illinois also protects sexual orientation for employment discrimination. Neither Texas or Utah protects sexual orientation from employment discrimination. It is true that Salt Lake City recently passed Sexual orientation protection, but that is just for that city and not the state. I am not sure what you mean that Texas is behind Utah?


    I meant Utah now had laws protection homosexuals in housing and employment, and Texas is still to do so. But as you just told me it's only salt Lake City. Thats hard for me to get my head around, because if my City in Oz got a right, so would the rest of the state; I belive.


    Note: I edited my post to include cities in Texas protecting Sexual orientation from employment discrimation.




    yeah, we had sodomy laws. We also have humongously gay friendly areas, pride parades and the whole lot.

    I realise the legislation is off because it's run by a bunch of old farts, but it's not like the cops were banging your door down because of sodomy.
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    Nov 15, 2009 6:55 PM GMT
    Houston (TX), America's 4th largest city is likely to have it's first openly gay mayor. The current city Comptroler an openly gay woman is in a runoff. Keep your fingers crossed and for those in Houston - vote often :-)
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    Nov 15, 2009 7:17 PM GMT
    Pattison saidAs a whole whats the attatude to homosexuality in Texas:

    Not only do my family have old roots in Australia we have them in the US of A too, on both sides of the family. Just outside of Houston is a Town called Pattison. this come to be from land my family were to donate, thus it has one of my family name.


    Given the size (both geographically and population wise) of Texas it would be hard to say that Texas has a single consistent view on homosexuality.
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    Nov 15, 2009 9:20 PM GMT
    Funkapottomous said

    yeah, we had sodomy laws. We also have humongously gay friendly areas, pride parades and the whole lot.

    I realise the legislation is off because it's run by a bunch of old farts, but it's not like the cops were banging your door down because of sodomy.


    Tell that to John Geddes Lawrence and Tyron Garner: They were the ones arrested by Harris Country (Houston Area) Sheriff for having consensual anal sex in their apartment. Their case eventually made it to the Supreme court (Lawrence v. Texas 2003) thus leading to the ending of all Sodomy laws in the USA.
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    Nov 16, 2009 10:29 PM GMT
    phemt said
    Funkapottomous said

    yeah, we had sodomy laws. We also have humongously gay friendly areas, pride parades and the whole lot.

    I realise the legislation is off because it's run by a bunch of old farts, but it's not like the cops were banging your door down because of sodomy.


    Tell that to John Geddes Lawrence and Tyron Garner: They were the ones arrested by Harris Country (Houston Area) Sheriff for having consensual anal sex in their apartment. Their case eventually made it to the Supreme court (Lawrence v. Texas 2003) thus leading to the ending of all Sodomy laws in the USA.
    well there you go.

    no more sodomy laws.


    quitcherbitchin'
  • jarhead5536

    Posts: 1348

    Nov 16, 2009 10:34 PM GMT
    JW61 saidHouston (TX), America's 4th largest city is likely to have it's first openly gay mayor. The current city Comptroler an openly gay woman is in a runoff. Keep your fingers crossed and for those in Houston - vote often :-)


    Don't hold your breath. If Parker's lesbianism wasn't an issue before, it certainly will be now. Her opponent's campaign has already leaked as much to the media. I grew up in that Godforsaken racist sexist homophobic cowboy town, and all I can say is "it's a nice place to be from." Joel Osteen's presence alone makes the place uninhabitable for any thinking person...
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14348

    Nov 16, 2009 10:47 PM GMT
    Houston is a great city and it is definately the best city in Texas because it offers so much to see and do. The gay nightlife is the best in the lone star state. The downtown skyline is a magnificent work of modern, cutting edge architecture. The museums and parks are fantastic. There is world class shopping and a great sports scene. Houston is also the most ethnically diverse city in Texas. Plus nearby Galveston with its historic architecture, sandy beaches with endless fun in the hot Texas sun is just a short hop down I-45 or if you like a slower pace, Texas Route 3. Yes there are conservative, right wing hotheads in Houston, but most natives are quite open-minded and accepting.
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    Nov 16, 2009 11:07 PM GMT
    phemt saidSodomy was against the law in Texas until the Supreme Court (in 2003) ruled such laws unconstitutional (Lawrence v. Texas). That should tell you something.


    Actually what it tells you is that a dedicated Houston lawyer, Mitchell Katine, and his two courageous clients John Lawrence and Tyrone Geddes, stepped up and fought the sodomy law all the way to the Supreme Court. Texas' own appeals court had actually held the sodomy law unconstitutional but the federal appeal was made necessary by the intervening cross-appeal of a rural District Attorney from Potter County.

    In reality the Texas sodomy law had gone unenforced for years and years and was considered an embarrassing relic by the legal community. It's not clear how Lawrence and Geddes ended up getting charged.

    In any case the gay communities of Houston, Dallas, etc. can hardly be said to be groaning under the lash of oppression. In Houston we are about to elect our first openly gay mayor, Annise Parker.
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    Nov 17, 2009 3:00 AM GMT
    TexDef07 said
    phemt saidSodomy was against the law in Texas until the Supreme Court (in 2003) ruled such laws unconstitutional (Lawrence v. Texas). That should tell you something.


    Actually what it tells you is that a dedicated Houston lawyer, Mitchell Katine, and his two courageous clients John Lawrence and Tyrone Geddes, stepped up and fought the sodomy law all the way to the Supreme Court. Texas' own appeals court had actually held the sodomy law unconstitutional but the federal appeal was made necessary by the intervening cross-appeal of a rural District Attorney from Potter County.

    In reality the Texas sodomy law had gone unenforced for years and years and was considered an embarrassing relic by the legal community. It's not clear how Lawrence and Geddes ended up getting charged.

    In any case the gay communities of Houston, Dallas, etc. can hardly be said to be groaning under the lash of oppression. In Houston we are about to elect our first openly gay mayor, Annise Parker.


    A "relic" of a law could be enforced at anyime. This is the reason "relic" laws should be removed from the books. I am glad that sodomy laws have been found unconstitutional. In several places though there still reminds "relic" laws on the book (and not just dealing with sexuality). It only takes a nut-job or two to start enforcing any "relic" law remaining on the books.
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    Nov 24, 2009 8:14 PM GMT
    phemt said
    TexDef07 said
    phemt saidSodomy was against the law in Texas until the Supreme Court (in 2003) ruled such laws unconstitutional (Lawrence v. Texas). That should tell you something.


    Actually what it tells you is that a dedicated Houston lawyer, Mitchell Katine, and his two courageous clients John Lawrence and Tyrone Geddes, stepped up and fought the sodomy law all the way to the Supreme Court. Texas' own appeals court had actually held the sodomy law unconstitutional but the federal appeal was made necessary by the intervening cross-appeal of a rural District Attorney from Potter County.

    In reality the Texas sodomy law had gone unenforced for years and years and was considered an embarrassing relic by the legal community. It's not clear how Lawrence and Geddes ended up getting charged.

    In any case the gay communities of Houston, Dallas, etc. can hardly be said to be groaning under the lash of oppression. In Houston we are about to elect our first openly gay mayor, Annise Parker.


    A "relic" of a law could be enforced at anyime. This is the reason "relic" laws should be removed from the books. I am glad that sodomy laws have been found unconstitutional. In several places though there still reminds "relic" laws on the book (and not just dealing with sexuality). It only takes a nut-job or two to start enforcing any "relic" law remaining on the books.
    yeah, and then the exact same thing will happen. they will go to court and the relic laws will be taken off the books. the only reason they're not taken off the books now is because no nutjob's gone about enforcing them so there's no need to address it at all.

    the fact of the matter is that Texas can be very progressive (downtown houston; montrose, Austin, etc) or it can be very backwoods. (more rural areas) you just have to find the right place to go about doing your thing.
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    Nov 24, 2009 11:48 PM GMT
    Well I grew up in California, and have since moved to Texas. I can tell you I think it's absolutely amazing here, and am so glad I was able to find a way to move here. I feel more comfortable here than I did in San Francisco, frankly, because California has its own baggage (and San Francisco is a collection of neighborhoods - good luck being gay in Chinatown or Bay View/Hunter's Point).
  • JP85257

    Posts: 3284

    Nov 24, 2009 11:49 PM GMT
    I may be moving back to Dallas after Jan 1.
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    Nov 25, 2009 2:29 AM GMT
    Funkapottomous said
    phemt said
    TexDef07 said
    phemt saidSodomy was against the law in Texas until the Supreme Court (in 2003) ruled such laws unconstitutional (Lawrence v. Texas). That should tell you something.


    Actually what it tells you is that a dedicated Houston lawyer, Mitchell Katine, and his two courageous clients John Lawrence and Tyrone Geddes, stepped up and fought the sodomy law all the way to the Supreme Court. Texas' own appeals court had actually held the sodomy law unconstitutional but the federal appeal was made necessary by the intervening cross-appeal of a rural District Attorney from Potter County.

    In reality the Texas sodomy law had gone unenforced for years and years and was considered an embarrassing relic by the legal community. It's not clear how Lawrence and Geddes ended up getting charged.

    In any case the gay communities of Houston, Dallas, etc. can hardly be said to be groaning under the lash of oppression. In Houston we are about to elect our first openly gay mayor, Annise Parker.


    A "relic" of a law could be enforced at anyime. This is the reason "relic" laws should be removed from the books. I am glad that sodomy laws have been found unconstitutional. In several places though there still reminds "relic" laws on the book (and not just dealing with sexuality). It only takes a nut-job or two to start enforcing any "relic" law remaining on the books.
    yeah, and then the exact same thing will happen. they will go to court and the relic laws will be taken off the books. the only reason they're not taken off the books now is because no nutjob's gone about enforcing them so there's no need to address it at all.

    the fact of the matter is that Texas can be very progressive (downtown houston; montrose, Austin, etc) or it can be very backwoods. (more rural areas) you just have to find the right place to go about doing your thing.


    Someone has to have the will and the means to go about the challenge. The easier way would be for the local legislature to remove the "relic" law themselves. Imagine the legislature being proactive in removing "relic laws" and avoid the whole possible trouble of Judicial Review/challenge.
  • MercuryMax

    Posts: 713

    Nov 25, 2009 2:31 AM GMT
    phemt saidSodomy was against the law in Texas until the Supreme Court (in 2003) ruled such laws unconstitutional (Lawrence v. Texas). That should tell you something. Also, Texas currently has no laws protecting sexual orienation for employment discrimination.


    Omg, just another reason for me to hate texas.....I refuse to capitalize the letter t in texas....ugh!!! So mad.icon_mad.gif