Twink...?

  • dannyboy1101

    Posts: 977

    Nov 18, 2009 2:53 AM GMT
    If you were to define someone under the label of twink (which I don't use myself), are you qualifying that person as a twink because of their facial structure, body type, age, amount of body hair, or a combination of some or all of these factors? Are there any assumptions that you make on the basis of this label?
  • mcwclewis

    Posts: 1701

    Nov 18, 2009 3:08 AM GMT
    There've been threads on this before



    I personally don't call anyone that. I think it's degrading
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    Nov 18, 2009 3:22 AM GMT
    People call me a twink a lot. It's starting to get on my nerves
  • jrs1

    Posts: 4388

    Nov 18, 2009 5:50 AM GMT

    http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=twink
  • trl_

    Posts: 994

    Nov 18, 2009 5:52 AM GMT
    When applied to me I feel it implies I'm unintelligent. icon_confused.gif
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    Nov 18, 2009 1:21 PM GMT
    mcwclewis saidThere've been threads on this before



    I personally don't call anyone that. I think it's degrading


    how is that degrading?

    are you against calling guys bears too?

    It's just a label, and you can choose not to use it, but I don't see how it is degrading.
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    Nov 18, 2009 1:40 PM GMT
    I much prefer the 'twink' label over the 'are you 12?' label.

    I think the label is more often given for one's perceived age with the attendant lack of body/facial hair. A muscular build, on an obviously young guy, is still, more often than not, twinkified.

    Just another way that we, as a society, obsess over youth and looking young, all the while dismiss youth as nothing more than nice packaging with nothing "real" to offer.
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    Nov 18, 2009 1:49 PM GMT
    BradySF saidI much prefer the 'twink' label over the 'are you 12?' label.

    I think the label is more often given for one's perceived age with the attendant lack of body/facial hair. A muscular build, on an obviously young guy, is still, more often than not, twinkified.

    Just another way that we, as a society, obsess over youth and looking young, all the while dismiss youth as nothing more than nice packaging with nothing "real" to offer.


    Well said Brady... I think you hit the nail right on the head with your responsed. I "was" a twink when young, we all mature. How you age in body, mind and spirit is up to the individual. Bless you all.
    Chris
  • mcwclewis

    Posts: 1701

    Nov 18, 2009 3:57 PM GMT
    danielryan said
    mcwclewis saidThere've been threads on this before



    I personally don't call anyone that. I think it's degrading


    how is that degrading?

    are you against calling guys bears too?

    It's just a label, and you can choose not to use it, but I don't see how it is degrading.



    I don't like labeling in general. I think it promotes stereotyping and unnecessary assumptions. If other people want to call other people that, ok. If other people want to be called that, ok. I personally find it degrading
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    Nov 18, 2009 4:08 PM GMT
    I don't prefer to be called a twink at all, but a lot of people call me that.

    Aren't twinks suppose to be super skinny and young and dumb? I really don't know.
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    Nov 18, 2009 4:11 PM GMT
    danielryan said
    mcwclewis saidThere've been threads on this before



    I personally don't call anyone that. I think it's degrading


    how is that degrading?

    are you against calling guys bears too?

    It's just a label, and you can choose not to use it, but I don't see how it is degrading.



    I agree. We label all the time. Bears, jocks, twinks, geeks, whatever. They are single-word descriptions. I always felt a twink was describing a body type -- small, smooth, less muscle definition, boyish. I'm not sure what's degrading about that, or how it's a worse label than "jock" (if we're assuming that jock describes an athletic, toned body type and not literally an athlete).

  • mcwclewis

    Posts: 1701

    Nov 18, 2009 4:15 PM GMT
    [quote]

    I agree. We label all the time. Bears, jocks, twinks, geeks, whatever. They are single-word descriptions. I always felt a twink was describing a body type -- small, smooth, less muscle definition, boyish. I'm not sure what's degrading about that, or how it's a worse label than "jock" (if we're assuming that jock describes an athletic, toned body type and not literally an athlete).

    [/quote]


    Body image, my friend. Some people don't like being thin and take offense to being called "skinny." "Twink" is a dreaded label for someone who isn't happy with their size
  • ATLANTIS7

    Posts: 1213

    Nov 18, 2009 4:27 PM GMT
    I have never used it and never will and where did it come from USA?
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    Nov 18, 2009 4:31 PM GMT
    mcwclewis said[quote]

    I agree. We label all the time. Bears, jocks, twinks, geeks, whatever. They are single-word descriptions. I always felt a twink was describing a body type -- small, smooth, less muscle definition, boyish. I'm not sure what's degrading about that, or how it's a worse label than "jock" (if we're assuming that jock describes an athletic, toned body type and not literally an athlete).



    Body image, my friend. Some people don't like being thin and take offense to being called "skinny." "Twink" is a dreaded label for someone who isn't happy with their size[/quote]


    What would you suggest as an alternative to twink or skinny as a description? People take offense way too easily... I have an "average" body type. Who wants to be average? But a spade is a spade...

    By the way, I think your body is quite damn hot.

  • mcwclewis

    Posts: 1701

    Nov 18, 2009 4:51 PM GMT
    Thanks...



    "Thin" works just fine for me. I think it's context anyways. If a conversation comes up where my body weight relevant, "skinny" doesn't bother me nearly as much. If I just walk by one of my coworkers and hear them say "What's up, skinny?" That's what pisses me off. Unnecessary attention to something I'm already self-concious about. I actually have pretty thick skin inmost situations.
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    Nov 18, 2009 5:09 PM GMT
    mcwclewis saidThanks...



    "Thin" works just fine for me. I think it's context anyways. If a conversation comes up where my body weight relevant, "skinny" doesn't bother me nearly as much. If I just walk by one of my coworkers and hear them say "What's up, skinny?" That's what pisses me off. Unnecessary attention to something I'm already self-concious about. I actually have pretty thick skin inmost situations.



    Good point -- context is everything on a topic like this.