Hiking Insurance??

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 18, 2009 10:57 PM GMT
    I just moved to Las Vegas and am discovering the huge amount of outdoor opportunities. While hiking in Red Rock Canyon My friend started to tell me about the number of times a year people get hurt and need to be airlifted out of the various canyons or inaccessible areas in the mountians ( which standard insurance doesn't cover )
    A friend back home told me that when he goes hiking in Colorado he gets hiking insurance.. has anyone else ever heard of it, bought it, had to use it??
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 19, 2009 2:29 PM GMT
    I've not heard of hiking insurance, but you can get a membership to Life Flight in the Northwest (Idaho, Oregon, Washington) that is really cheap, like $50 a year, that will pay all the expenses of being lifted out if it's ever necessary. Look into whether or not there's something similar in your area to Life Flight and whether they have a similar program, if all you're looking for is a way to ensure that you don't get hit with a gigantic chopper bill.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 19, 2009 4:25 PM GMT

    If hiking insurance is available and not hemmed in by too many exclusions, etc it might be worth considering - provided you're sure that knowing you have it won't encourage you to take risks you otherwise wouldn't.

    Here in New Hampshire there is fury among hikers because the state has started charging hikers for the cost of search and rescue missions if some board makes the decision that the rescued hiker exercised poor judgement. Traditionally, these services were regarded as public safety functions - like the Fire Department. Yes, sometimes people do idiotic things - either out of stupidity or inexperience. But the risk of someone who is in need of help (or of people who know they are overdue returning) failing to raise the alarm because they fear being financially ruined by the rescue cost is too high.

    There is also the worry that this change in policy will simply discourage some new hikers from even stepping on to a trail, which would be a pity as one of New Hampshire's greatest assets is its network of well maintained accessible mountain hikes.