LGBT History 101: What All Gay Men Should Know

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    Nov 19, 2009 9:20 PM GMT
    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/718423/
    This thread inspired me to compiled this by no means conclusive list.
    Feel free to add to it, make mental notes and be grateful to the men and women who paved the way for the progress we've seen and the progress yet to come which is based on their hard fought efforts.
    "Thank you".

    Stonewall Riots – June 28, 1969

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stonewall_riots
    It was named after the gay bar in Greenwich Village in NYC the Stonewall Inn at 51-53 Christopher Street. Noted as the first gay uprising as a revolt against a government that was persecuting the homosexual community. Note the date and the date of most Gay Pride events. This marked the start of the gay rights movement in the U.S. some say around the world.

    Mattachine Society
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mattachine
    One of the first, and longest running of its time, national groups conceived with the goal of creating a community for gay men that were isolated and persecuted by society. Founded by Harry Hay in 1950
    Mattachine Review – the national publication for the Mattachine Society

    Daughters of Bilitis

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daughters_of_bilitis
    The national lesbian counterpart to the Mattachine Society, their Mission early on was geared more towards political activism. Founded in 1955 in San Francisco by Del Martin & Phyllis Lyon
    The Ladder – the publication of the Daughters of Bilitis

    Dell Lyon & Phyllis Martin
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Del_Martin_and_Phyllis_Lyon
    Del & Phyllis was the first same-sex couple to marry in San Francisco, on June 16, 2008. It was done by Mayor Gavin Newsom after the California Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriages.

    Proposition 8
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prop_8
    In November 2008 it overturned the California Supreme Courts ruling that legalized gay marriage.

    Dont Ask Dont Tell
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Don%27t_ask,_don%27t_tell
    Policy instated by the U.S. military which prohibits openly gay men and women from serving in the military. It basically says, If your gay you can serve… just don’t act like it and we might not persecute you. Then President Bill Clinton approved the policy.

    G.R.I.D.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gay-related_immune_deficiency
    The first proposed name for what is now known as AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AIDS ) because it was seen as a gay plague in 1982. The virus that causes AIDS now known as HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hiv ) was discovered as the probable cause in 1986.

    Matthew Shepard Act.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matthew_Shepard_Act
    An expansion on the 1969 national Hate Crime Law which includes hate crimes based on gender, sexual orientation and gender identity and disability. The act was named after the torture and killing of a gay 22 year old named Matthew Shepard http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matthew_Shepard in 1998 near Laramie Wyoming who was targeted and killed because he was gay.

    Sodomy Laws
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sodomy_laws
    Frequently categorizes anal and oral sex with bestiality, rarely enforced on heterosexual couples. Laws vary in the U.S. on a state by state basis.

    Johanna Siguroardottir

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J%C3%B3hanna_Sigur%C3%B0ard%C3%B3ttir
    Elected as Icelands he first female and openly gay Prime Minister in February 2009. This made her the first openly gay head of government in modern times.

    Mark Bingham

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Bingham
    He was PR professional, Rugby Player, national hero, my drinking buddy, boss and friend. Mark died in United flight 93 on September 11th, 2001. Mark was a Real Jock before there was a RealJock.
    We have the chance to be role models for other gay folks who wanted to play sports, but never felt good enough or strong enough. This is a great opportunity to change a lot of peoples minds, and to reach a group that might never have had to know or hear about gay people. Lets go make some new friends…and win a few games. – Mark Bingham

    Harvey Milk
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harvey_milk
    He was the first openly gay U.S. politician to be elected to public office. On November 27, 1978 he and then mayor of San Francisco George Moscone were assassinated by Dan White. Dan White was given a lenient sentencing due to his infamous Twinkie Defense which caused the White Night Riots http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Night_riots

    Pink Triangle
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pink_triangle
    The symbol used by the Nazis to identify men who were sent to concentration camps because they were gay. A symbol of persecution once inverted was turned upright as symbol of pride and perseverance.

    1974 -- American Psychiatric Associations votes to remove homosexuality from their list of Mental Illnesses in the Diagnostic & Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. This was due to research done by Alfred Kinsey and Evelyn Hooker.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diagnostic_and_Statistical_Manual_of_Mental_Disorders

    2007 -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration reaffirms their policy on prohibiting men who have sex with men from donating blood despite recommendations from the American Red Cross and the American Association of Blood Banks.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_sexual_orientation_and_medicine
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    Nov 19, 2009 10:04 PM GMT
    Spartan men were allowed to have sex with each other as a rite of passage to manhood, though once they were men they could practice it not longer. Interesting.
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    Nov 19, 2009 10:14 PM GMT
    ancient athenian society demanded pederasty. not so much of sexual relationships, the greeks didn't see it as homosexuality like we do, in fact it didn't even exist to them. the relationships were one of mentor and mentee. there was an elaborate courtship process that ensured that the man wasn't being too "pervy" (a modern way of looking at it) and that the boy wasn't to free, his friends and family would watch him.
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    Nov 19, 2009 10:20 PM GMT
    Athenians are not the same thing as Spartans, unless that was not in response to what the above poster said.
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    Nov 19, 2009 10:24 PM GMT
    it was not, merely and addition. and i agree. though my class did not focus on sparta since they were an anomaly amongst greek city states. the spartans used male/male relationships to strengthen the bonds between their soldiers, you would be much more willing to fight for you lover than just another guy. also it gives background to the story of the army of lovers, 500 couples that were believed to be unstoppable until alexander the great. though, it is just a legend. if only we allowed gays in the army, then we wouldn't have the cluster fuck in iraq and afganistan.
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    Nov 19, 2009 10:32 PM GMT
    Homosexuality was also present in the Chimu (Most famous city is Chan Chan, on the Peruvian coast) and Moche Cultures in Peru.

    The arrival of the Spanish, and the eventual conquest, ended these practices. However, surviving depictions of homosexual pairings in the form of pottery and ceramics show both oral and anal sex.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homosexuality_in_ancient_Peru


    The samurai of Japan also practiced a form of pederasty, commonly called bi-do, or the beautiful way.

    http://www.gay-art-history.org/gay-history/gay-customs/japan-samurai-male-love/japan-samurai-homosexual-shudo.html

    A few sources on the gradual evolution of same-sex practices in Buddhist Japan:

    http://www.westernbuddhistreview.com/vol3/homosexuality.html

    [url]http://books.google.com/books?id=UgKQ4KNDjsgC&pg=PA1&lpg=PA1&dq=homosexuality+in+medieval+japan&source=bl&ots=FcFzSjDdLx&sig=nRQko8f9Eqj0eWHSuPhJvuWMpng&hl=en&ei=QscFS5e_KpDYtgPJ9ID5Bg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4&ved=0CBAQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=homosexuality%20in%20medieval%20japan&f=false[/url]
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    Nov 20, 2009 12:23 AM GMT
    Wow I'm curious but to OP how did this topic come up? I just put something up a few days ago asking for people's memories of Milk/Mascone Assassinations and all that happened around those times. Interesting. Tracking and will look in to all this.
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    Nov 20, 2009 12:51 AM GMT
    That's a great starter list, though pretty modern & US-centric.

    A couple of other notable events/people in the modern era:

    Magnus Hirschfeld
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnus_Hirschfeld
    Probably the first modern gay rights activist. Founded numerous institutions, notably the WhK (see below), and also advocated for equality of women, transgendered, and other minority groups.

    WhK (The Scientific-Humanitarian Committee)
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientific_Humanitarian_Committee
    The first gay rights organization in history. Disbanded by the Nazis, their original goal was the repeal of Paragraph 175, the German law outlawing "coitus-like acts" between two men.

    Institut für Sexualwissenschaft
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Institut_für_Sexualwissenschaft
    Translated as the Institute for Sexual Research, it was one of the first sexology institutes in existence. It not only researched sex, but also was one of the first organizations to delve into transgenderism.
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    Nov 20, 2009 1:09 AM GMT
    Ryan_Andrew saidWow I'm curious but to OP how did this topic come up? I just put something up a few days ago asking for people's memories of Milk/Mascone Assassinations and all that happened around those times. Interesting. Tracking and will look in to all this.

    I was inspired by the stories the men who were posting on your thread, it spoke to me about LGBT history and reminded me of when I worked as a lead reporter and interviewed many people who work in the community. Strong men and women with so many stories, so many struggles.
    It has never been lost on me the persecution that those who came before us were subjected to in what is considered "a modern civilized society". Also the great sacrifices made so that there could be an "Out" LGBT community as we know it.
    My focus was mainly on the people and events that brought us to where we are as an LGBT community struggling for civil liberties. Men and women have sacrificed their livelihoods, families, homes, loved ones, personal safety, their very lives and dignity so that we can be where we are. I don't ever want to forget that.

    I love that *you* brought yourself out of the bubble that we so frequently take for granted to ask about the past experiences of those who lived through the initial onslaught of HIV/AIDS. I was young but I remember, it affected me & my family.
    You asked a thoughtful, refreshing question without pretense that gave others the opportunity to share their stories... thank you for asking it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 20, 2009 1:52 AM GMT
    October was National Gay Lesbian History Month http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LGBT_History_Month

    http://www.glbthistorymonth.com/glbthistorymonth/2008/






  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 20, 2009 2:41 AM GMT
    1and3Chairs saidOur history goes WAY farther back.

    The earliest legislation (that I know of for sure) occurs in 529 when the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I revised the Roman Law codes. Homosexual activity was punished by death. No questions.

    Florentine history is extremely interesting. I highly recommend Michael Rocke's Forbidden Friendships. He is a quantitative social historian. It will change everything you know.
    actually it goes back to the first intrusions of "christian" religion into government ..

    342 – The first law against homosexual marriage was promulgated by the Christian emperors Constantius II and Constans.

    here is a nice timeline with more info to help put things into perspective

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_LGBT_history
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    Nov 20, 2009 2:47 AM GMT
    Here is the portal page to all things gay on wikipedia. It changes constantly and is a good start to educate yourself about LGBT matters. In most of these articles you can look up the references to external articles, external references, multimedia, etc. It is a good way of finding books related to subjects you are interested in.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portal:LGBT
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    Nov 21, 2009 3:26 AM GMT
    EasilyDistracted said
    Ryan_Andrew saidWow I'm curious but to OP how did this topic come up? I just put something up a few days ago asking for people's memories of Milk/Mascone Assassinations and all that happened around those times. Interesting. Tracking and will look in to all this.

    I was inspired by the stories the men who were posting on your thread, it spoke to me about LGBT history and reminded me of when I worked as a lead reporter and interviewed many people who work in the community. Strong men and women with so many stories, so many struggles.
    It has never been lost on me the persecution that those who came before us were subjected to in what is considered "a modern civilized society". Also the great sacrifices made so that there could be an "Out" LGBT community as we know it.
    My focus was mainly on the people and events that brought us to where we are as an LGBT community struggling for civil liberties. Men and women have sacrificed their livelihoods, families, homes, loved ones, personal safety, their very lives and dignity so that we can be where we are. I don't ever want to forget that.

    I love that *you* brought yourself out of the bubble that we so frequently take for granted to ask about the past experiences of those who lived through the initial onslaught of HIV/AIDS. I was young but I remember, it affected me & my family.
    You asked a thoughtful, refreshing question without pretense that gave others the opportunity to share their stories... thank you for asking it.


    Oh wow... well thanks! I have got a lot of reading to do. Starbucks, here I come. =D
  • metta

    Posts: 39104

    Jun 02, 2014 7:57 PM GMT
    1970s News Clips On Gay Rights