Short Life Span for New Laptops

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 23, 2009 3:31 PM GMT
    How long has your laptop lasted? Don't be suprised, if it dies the first year. icon_sad.gif I have a Dell that is a year old now and still kicking, but probably will die next year. Computer manufacturers are really screwing everybody, just like everyone else does in corporate America. Screw the consumer is their middle name. And then after they screw everybody, they wonder why computer sales are down. What do they expect? Do they think people have a grand a year to throw away every year?

    Our freezer died after 7 years and I was told that freezers are intentially made to die after 7-10 years because of federal laws. I think we need to oust everyone in the federal governemt because they all have a screw loose. And then they wonder why the economy is in the shape it is. I really don't want the federal goverment to get it's hands on health care either because they are going to screw this country royally with their stupidity.

    Check out this article on yahoo:

    1 in 3 Laptops Die in First Three Years

    So your new laptop computer died inside of a year. "I'll never buy a computer from [insert manufacturer name here] again!" I've heard the protests time and time again.

    Yeah, maybe you got a lemon, but no matter which brand you bought, you truly are not alone in this situation: An analysis of 30,000 new laptops from SquareTrade, which provides aftermarket warranty coverage for electronics products, has found that in the first three years of ownership, nearly a third of laptops (31 percent) will fail.

    That's actually better than I would have expected based on my experience and observations on how people treat their equipment.

    SquareTrade has more detailed information (the full PDF of the company's study is available here) on the research on its website. But here are some highlights about how, why, and which laptops fail:

    > 20.4 percent of failures are due to hardware malfunctions. 10.6 percent are due to drops, spills, or other accidental damage.

    > Netbooks have a roughly 20 percent higher failure rate due to hardware malfunctions than standard laptops. The more you pay for your laptop, the less likely it is to fail in general (maybe because you're more careful with it?).

    > The most reliable companies? A shocker: Toshiba and Asus, both with below a 16 percent failure rate due to hardware malfunction.

    > The least reliable brands? Acer, Gateway, and HP. HP's hardware malfunction rate, the worst in SquareTrade's analysis, is a whopping 25.6 percent.

    None of the numbers are overly surprising. As SquareTrade notes, "the typical laptop endures more use and abuse than nearly any other consumer electronic device (with the possible exception of cell phones)," so failures are really inevitable.

    Want to keep your notebook running for longer than a few years? Ensure your laptop is as drop-proofed as possible (use a padded bag or case, route cords so they won't be tripped on, lock children in another room), and protect it as best you can from heat and dust.

  • MikePhilPerez

    Posts: 4357

    Nov 23, 2009 3:44 PM GMT
    G_Force saidHow long has your laptop lasted? Don't be suprised, if it dies the first year. icon_sad.gif I have a Dell that is a year old now and still kicking, but probably will die next year. Computer manufacturers are really screwing everybody, just like everyone else does in corporate America. Screw the consumer is their middle name. And then after they screw everybody, they wonder why computer sales are down. What do they expect? Do they think people have a grand a year to throw away every year?

    Check out this article on yahoo:

    1 in 3 Laptops Die in First Three Years

    So your new laptop computer died inside of a year. "I'll never buy a computer from [insert manufacturer name here] again!" I've heard the protests time and time again.

    Yeah, maybe you got a lemon, but no matter which brand you bought, you truly are not alone in this situation: An analysis of 30,000 new laptops from SquareTrade, which provides aftermarket warranty coverage for electronics products, has found that in the first three years of ownership, nearly a third of laptops (31 percent) will fail.

    That's actually better than I would have expected based on my experience and observations on how people treat their equipment.

    SquareTrade has more detailed information (the full PDF of the company's study is available here) on the research on its website. But here are some highlights about how, why, and which laptops fail:

    > 20.4 percent of failures are due to hardware malfunctions. 10.6 percent are due to drops, spills, or other accidental damage.

    > Netbooks have a roughly 20 percent higher failure rate due to hardware malfunctions than standard laptops. The more you pay for your laptop, the less likely it is to fail in general (maybe because you're more careful with it?).

    > The most reliable companies? A shocker: Toshiba and Asus, both with below a 16 percent failure rate due to hardware malfunction.

    > The least reliable brands? Acer, Gateway, and HP. HP's hardware malfunction rate, the worst in SquareTrade's analysis, is a whopping 25.6 percent.

    None of the numbers are overly surprising. As SquareTrade notes, "the typical laptop endures more use and abuse than nearly any other consumer electronic device (with the possible exception of cell phones)," so failures are really inevitable.

    Want to keep your notebook running for longer than a few years? Ensure your laptop is as drop-proofed as possible (use a padded bag or case, route cords so they won't be tripped on, lock children in another room), Better yet, lock laptop in another room. What you suggest is child abuse. and protect it as best you can from heat and dust.

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  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 23, 2009 4:01 PM GMT
    Consumer Reports says my partner's MacBook Pro is highly reliable, and in 25 years of Apple computer ownership I've never had a single hardware failure. His MacBook is now 1 year old, I got it for him last year the first week of December as an early Christmas gift, since his HP desktop had developed various problems.

    As for tripping over power cords, the Mac solution is pretty good: the plug connects magnetically to the notebook and is flat-ended and flush, without prongs or a spike ("MagSafe"), not being recessed into the computer at all. If someone yanks the cord, it just pops free easily, with no chance of damage to the computer or the cord.

    At home his MacBook sits raised up an inch on a special stand, so air circulates under it for better cooling. He uses a separate Apple wireless Bluetooth keyboard, which eliminates wear on the built-in keyboard, an Achilles heel for notebooks. It's connected to a detached and larger flat screen, so the notebook's own screen is almost never on, except when used away from home. Indeed, at home it mainly functions like a desktop CPU tower, only used as a self-contained notebook when he takes it somewhere.
  • JHunter

    Posts: 41

    Nov 23, 2009 4:22 PM GMT
    Yeah my laptop just died. Only two years old, always carried it in a case and never dropped it. It was an HP, I will never buy another one.
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    Nov 23, 2009 4:29 PM GMT
    My Dells lasted three years tops, not to mention the numerous freezes and hardware failures. I now have two Macs, the oldest of which is still going strong after 4+ years, they almost never freeze on me and I count the number of times on one hand I have had to send either of them in for major repairs. Dell sucks.
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    Nov 23, 2009 4:58 PM GMT
    The biggest complaint I have from our notebook clients is how slow their machine is. Then I remind them that it's about 5 years old, that they let their 13-year old load tons of crap on it, and that we can either clean it out or that it may be time for a new one.

    The one I gave my mom is going on 6 years old. It runs a bit slow for my liking and I suggested getting a new one... and she shot me down.

    It's unfortunate that most people only look at price when they buy computers and never consider quality, or think that everything is the same so why pay a little bit more for something that in reality is a lot better. Not just better quality, but significantly faster components, too.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 23, 2009 5:00 PM GMT
    Just think of how our landfills our being filled with all this crap, just because we intentially make stuff to last only a few years. And then we wonder why our earth and water is polluted and why there is so much cancer and other diseases. We bring on our own ills with our stupidity.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 23, 2009 5:05 PM GMT
    My Dell lap top is 1.5 years old and the only problem I've had thus far - the DVD drivers disappeared one day.

    Other than this it has been fine.

    And I amexpecting a good 5 years use out of it.
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    Nov 23, 2009 5:11 PM GMT
    I got my first Dell laptop in 2002. It actually still works, I have to use an wireless mouse with it because the touch pad stopped working, but other than that, no major issues. My newest Dell, which I got in 2007 has had all kinds of problems, I have had it serviced two or three times in the last year.

    My parents bought a Frigidaire washer and dryer when they got married in 1978. The units finally had to be replaced 2003 or 2004, so they bought a new washer and dryer, Frigidaire again. The washer went out within four years, unbelievable...right?
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    Nov 23, 2009 5:13 PM GMT
    I don't know if this is true or not, but I was told that we actually have the knowledge and technology to produce computers and technological equipment that is much better than what we currently have, but they intentially will not manufacture them because there is a plan to slowly introduce each new feature every couple years, so that people will want to buy all new equipment every couple years.
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    Nov 23, 2009 5:14 PM GMT
    jmals23 saidI got my first Dell laptop in 2002. It actually still works, I have to use an wireless mouse with it because the touch pad stopped working, but other than that, no major issues. My newest Dell, which I got in 2007 has had all kinds of problems, I have had it serviced two or three times in the last year.

    My parents bought a Frigidaire washer and dryer when they got married in 1978. The units finally had to be replaced 2003 or 2004, so they bought a new washer and dryer, Frigidaire again. The washer went out within four years, unbelievable...right?


    NO. why should a company make a product that lasts forever.

    There's no revenue in that
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Nov 23, 2009 5:15 PM GMT
    I have a notebook at home thats about 3 years old. No issues in the least and its a Dell. I've thought about replacing some of the desktops we have here in my office with notebooks. I might have to reconsider that consideration.
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    Nov 23, 2009 5:16 PM GMT
    Im going on my 3rd year with my macbook and the only problem ive had is the harddrive crashed within the 1st year but they replaced it for free and since then smooth sailing
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    Nov 23, 2009 5:19 PM GMT
    Planned obsolescence does suck as a consumer. That being said my Dell Inspiron 9400 is 3.5 yrs old and doing just fine. Bought it off their scratch and dent site. I suspect that was risky but otherwise very happy. We do kill off lap tops (all brands) at work prematurely as they get used pretty rough and go everywhere w/us.
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    Nov 23, 2009 5:23 PM GMT
    The problem with laptops, and computer hardware in general, is that it's getting to a point where parts are creating huge amounts of heat.

    The reason why this isn't such a big deal with desktops is that, typically, you have a large case with several fans pushing cool air around constantly.

    Laptops are expected to be on par with desktops now, but their cases can't even come close to moving as much air. Heat build up wears out parts, plain and simple.

    Until we get an effective way to have advanced cooling systems (ie, water) on a reasonably portable scale this is going to stay an issue.

    One more reason not to get a laptop... ;)
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    Nov 23, 2009 5:24 PM GMT
    Blackguy4you said
    jmals23 saidI got my first Dell laptop in 2002. It actually still works, I have to use an wireless mouse with it because the touch pad stopped working, but other than that, no major issues. My newest Dell, which I got in 2007 has had all kinds of problems, I have had it serviced two or three times in the last year.

    My parents bought a Frigidaire washer and dryer when they got married in 1978. The units finally had to be replaced 2003 or 2004, so they bought a new washer and dryer, Frigidaire again. The washer went out within four years, unbelievable...right?


    NO. why should a company make a product that lasts forever.

    There's no revenue in that


    But they have no revenue now either because they broke the pocketbooks of the consumer who can not afford to buy all new appliances and equipment every couple years. If they can't see what they have done to the economy, they are stupid. I told the Fridigaire guy, if freezers only last 7- 10 years, keep your crap, I don't want it. I went out and bought a used one that is over 40 years old and still running and will last longer than their new piece of shit.
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    Nov 23, 2009 5:32 PM GMT
    GwgTrunks saidThe problem with laptops, and computer hardware in general, is that it's getting to a point where parts are creating huge amounts of heat.

    The reason why this isn't such a big deal with desktops is that, typically, you have a large case with several fans pushing cool air around constantly.

    Laptops are expected to be on par with desktops now, but their cases can't even come close to moving as much air. Heat build up wears out parts, plain and simple.

    Until we get an effective way to have advanced cooling systems (ie, water) on a reasonably portable scale this is going to stay an issue.

    One more reason not to get a laptop... ;)


    Don't kid yourself. They have the knowledge to make them last longer, but they won't because as intellectual as they are, they lack plain common sense and our stupid and it's all because of their greed. They want you coming back every year and buying a new one.
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    Nov 23, 2009 5:41 PM GMT
    I've had my MacBook for 3 years now. Aside from an odd hard drive glitch a couple years back, it's run perfectly, and it's hardly pampered - I throw it in a bag and drag it along with me almost everywhere. I usually replace my computer every three-four years simply because the latest version is faster and shinier.
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    Nov 23, 2009 5:42 PM GMT
    Caesarea4 saidThe biggest complaint I have from our notebook clients is how slow their machine is. Then I remind them that it's about 5 years old, that they let their 13-year old load tons of crap on it, and that we can either clean it out or that it may be time for a new one.

    The one I gave my mom is going on 6 years old. It runs a bit slow for my liking and I suggested getting a new one... and she shot me down.

    It's unfortunate that most people only look at price when they buy computers and never consider quality, or think that everything is the same so why pay a little bit more for something that in reality is a lot better. Not just better quality, but significantly faster components, too.


    Price is the bottom line now with the majority of consumers. That's why even though Wal-mart sells a lot of shit, people buy it because it's cheap and they have built a successful company on selling shit. lol
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 23, 2009 5:45 PM GMT
    I build my own. I've never once had a hardware failure. One of the boxes that I made was sent to a friend. He still has it eight years later. I have not heard about laptops having longevity issues. Interesting.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 23, 2009 5:48 PM GMT
    G_Force> I don't know if this is true or not, but I was told that we actually have the knowledge and technology to produce computers and technological equipment that is much better than what we currently have, but they intentially will not manufacture them because there is a plan to slowly introduce each new feature every couple years, so that people will want to buy all new equipment every couple years.

    No, that's not true. If it were true, someone like AMD would come out with the 10 GHz CPU and grab more than their current paltry market share while Intel (allegedly) attempted to milk its customers year after year.

    Actually, when it comes to CPUs, there's something called "Moore's Law" (the number of transistors on an IC will double every two years - which corresponds to what the user sees as speed/capacity/power). Some have though that the industry couldn't keep up with this, but it's done fairly well over the last 44 years.


    HndsmKansan> I've thought about replacing some of the desktops we have here in my office with notebooks. I might have to reconsider that consideration.

    Just make sure you buy a quality notebook, not the cheapest thing you can find. If half the cars on the road were Yugos, would you be surprised that 1/3rd of cars had a lot of problems? Be smart and look at the TCO rather than just the price up front.

    When it comes to notebooks, if it doesn't have a 3 year warranty... there's probably a reason for it. (Or if it's a lot of money to upgrade the warranty from 1 to 3 years....)

    Don't buy cheap, buy smart.
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    Nov 23, 2009 5:51 PM GMT
    A note about laptops is that they're still electronics. Folks get them wet, drop them, spill shit on them, knock them off their beds while sleeping, leave them in a hot car, leave them in a cold car, etc.

    You have to take care of your pc.

    The number one problem with today's laptops is getting rid of heat. A well ventilated pc requires fans. Fans take power and size. So, compromises are made.

    At home, I've had one pc, a Pentium 400, that's been running nearly non-stop since 1998 (one of our test LINUX boxes). Once a year, I clean the fans (it has an extra fan). It also has a UPS in front of it, that's well maintained. (Just took a power bump a few minutes ago.) "tester" as the little P400 is affectionately called, has been working flawlessly for 11 years.

    If you want a laptop that will last, a large one is often better, because it's well-ventilated. Although strides have been made in heat management, the components are sensitive and need to run as cool as possible. Heat kills computers.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 23, 2009 5:51 PM GMT
    I have a Macbook, and it's going on 4 years old. I got it when this model first came out. The battery has just begun to get less than 3 hours on a charge. It's held up pretty damn well compared to the Compaq laptop I had before.
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    Nov 23, 2009 5:53 PM GMT
    Can't have your cake and eat it, too. Spend a little more on a laptop that isn't a piece of shit and maintain realistic expectations of the lifespan of that laptop. Systems don't become obsolete because they can no longer perform the tasks they did at purchase. They become obsolete because we ask them to perform increasingly demanding tasks throughout their lifespan.
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    Nov 23, 2009 5:55 PM GMT
    Ive had my hp for 5 years.