Training with Pilonidal Disease

  • Rowing_Ant

    Posts: 1504

    Nov 29, 2009 6:05 PM GMT
    Hey guys,

    Its been a while since I posted on here, but I've got a question to ask.

    I suffer from Pilonnidal Disease and had a pilonidal sinus excised 17/12/2007 (so two years ago , nearly) Its all healed and is great...but...my Occupational Health Nurse, my General Practicioner and the specialist I see recommend that

    I avoid tight fitting clothing and boxers or similar underwear with a seam in the back

    I have to shower twice a day, especially my arse and keep that area shaved and very very clean and try not to get sweaty.

    Use a coccyx cushion to sit on

    That I can no longer Row, Ride a Horse, Ride a Bike or Run and at the moment due to scar tissue etc avoid heavy lifting and lower body exercises.

    So what does that leavae me with? I feel totally friggin gutted that I cannot take part in sports Ive done since I was a kid, and being a Personal Trainer, leaves me a bit screwed I feel in the gym.

    Also, what training CAN I do? Ive been told what I cant do but Im running out of ideas for keeping in shape/stacking on some muscle size. Help. Im jsut demoralised to fuck.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 29, 2009 6:18 PM GMT
    I had one removed 2 months ago. They told me I could keep doing all those things. I row, I ride my bike, I wear tight clothes. After 2 months. You should not restrict yourself anymore after 2 years. Go do all those things again. Just keep washing the area and you'll be ok.

    Promises

    icon_biggrin.gif
  • Rowing_Ant

    Posts: 1504

    Nov 29, 2009 6:24 PM GMT
    Hey

    Sorry to hear youve had the same shit experience as me.

    Did you have a full excision with it left open and nasty or the closed procedure???

    My Specialist has said to avoid activities that may have contributed tothe problem in the first place and may or will cause the problem to re-occur, hence no rowing, riding, biking. Ive also got to admit, the whole coccyx area is bloody sensitive verging on pain when sitting still.....hyper senstive.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 29, 2009 6:27 PM GMT
    Open wound. Healed nicely. I was told it shouldn;t happen again if i keep it clean. But I can keep doing everything I did before.
  • Rowing_Ant

    Posts: 1504

    Nov 29, 2009 6:28 PM GMT
    I'll go back and get a second opinion then!!

    I dont want to hang up my rowing shorts just yet. What position do you row?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 29, 2009 6:29 PM GMT
    I cox. They're going to let me scull as a novice next year.
  • Rowing_Ant

    Posts: 1504

    Nov 29, 2009 6:32 PM GMT
    Sweet.

    Im a cox too. I used to be stroke for my University Novice Mens 4+ until we got an intake of four 6-foot plus freshers...and I was promoted/demoted to cox. I love it.icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 29, 2009 9:45 PM GMT
    After surgery, there's always some level of scar tissue. You may wish to speak to an occupational therapist about steps you can take to reduce the scar tissue. With the right therapy, an excision probably doesn't mean a total life style change.

    Some medical folks are too conservative and clueless about physical therapy.

    Recently, I had my biceps reattached (a short biceps distal tendon chronic complete tear). The surgery was October 7. The cast was taken off after 12 days, and I started physical therapy. Initially, I was expected to wear a brace for 8 weeks, but, only needed it for three. I'm over a month ahead on my recovery, and have nearly full range of motion back already (some folks take a year). My doctor has a degree in bio medical engineering, and despite what several of his peers thought did my arm without a graft so my muscle is as tight as before. We've broken up almost all the scar tissue. December 28, 2009, I go to back to the gym fully unrestricted.

    I suggest you seek less conservative advice, become more pro-active and positive in your post surgical management and get the show on the road. You need to help yourself in these matters.

    Undertand, medicine in this country is not about wellness promotion, but, about disease and injury treatment. You need to get off your ass, break up the scar tissue, research everything you can, quit feeling sorry for yourself, and get your old life back. It's what winners do. As a trainer, you would probably do well to take that approach of walking into, through, beyond, and above to help yourself here.

    You had a boil on your ass, they took it out, and now you need to get on with your life. This isn't cancer, nor brain surgery.