i want your abs.......

  • atomohawk

    Posts: 10

    Dec 28, 2007 11:59 PM GMT
    ok well i dont really want yours....i want my own....but i want to get some definition (like a six-pack and not the keg i have now)

    so heres the thing.
    i go to the gym.....about 4-5 times a week.
    i use various machines (but after a while those get boring)
    so i want to go jump on a mat and so some other exercises. but i dont want to look like a fool.
    i dont know any exercises i can do, or how to do them properly.

    wouold anyone be willing to share some of their secrest with me and anyone else that wants to read this thread?

    it would be greatly appreciated.

    thanx,

    Jason
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    Dec 29, 2007 2:58 AM GMT
    90% of ab definition is nutrition. Start by keeping a log of what you are eating. Fitday.com has a great daily journal. This will sound odd, but if you want abs, do squats. The legs are among the largest muscles in the body. Not only does more muscle mass mean increased metabolism, but also increased testosterone, which will also help burn fat.
    Good luck
    mike
  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Dec 29, 2007 1:58 PM GMT
    fitguy's absolutely right
    get the bf% down and you'll start being happy with your abs
    get on a healthy low fat diet
    cut the processed carbs
    and up the cardio...and you'll be fine
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    Dec 29, 2007 4:04 PM GMT
    P90X

    The Ab Ripper X workout is only like 18 minutes long and it destroys my core and abs. It's about 11 different positions that you can do on a mat without any required equipment.

    It also comes with a nutrition guide too, because as the above posters said: low bf% is important for definition. But don't starve yourself. Those Auschwitz guys didn't have that great of abs.
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    Dec 29, 2007 5:35 PM GMT
    From a previous post

    It takes time depending on your amount of body fat, your cardio workout, and your diet. It took me 8 months to get mine, starting at 19% body fat. Do more than 20 minutes of cardio. You need to be on the treadmill for at least 45 minutes. Remember it takes 20 minutes before your body will call on it's body fat for energy. And do some 30 second sprints, try for 7. The treadmill will burn off your body fat. Then do crunches not sit ups. Sit ups do not target the abdominal muscle.
    Abs are born in the kitchen, so eat clean, this is the biggest part that most people don't get. Do your research on this. Don't get frustrated stay with it, no matter how long it takes. You'll look awesome.
    Joe
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    Dec 30, 2007 3:33 PM GMT
    maxx10 saidFrom a previous post

    It takes time depending on your amount of body fat, your cardio workout, and your diet. It took me 8 months to get mine, starting at 19% body fat. Do more than 20 minutes of cardio. You need to be on the treadmill for at least 45 minutes. Remember it takes 20 minutes before your body will call on it's body fat for energy. And do some 30 second sprints, try for 7. The treadmill will burn off your body fat. Then do crunches not sit ups. Sit ups do not target the abdominal muscle.
    Abs are born in the kitchen, so eat clean, this is the biggest part that most people don't get. Do your research on this. Don't get frustrated stay with it, no matter how long it takes. You'll look awesome.
    Joe
    I hate to say it...but you are right. It takes time and work. Sometimes I feel like I am starving myself just to get there.
    If you drink, you need to lay off alcohol.
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    Dec 30, 2007 11:32 PM GMT
    I'm not so sure that having abs are 90% nutrition. Ive always had a high metabolism and eat very clean. I eat alot though. I also usually skimp on the abs when I work out since I take so long on the other body parts. I'm starting to realize that my abs are really lacking though. You definitely need to find an efective exercise. Does anyone know of any? I haven't really been able to find one I can tolerate.
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    Dec 31, 2007 3:30 AM GMT
    I'm curious about this, too. I have a Tanita that measures my body fat, and it puts me between 15 and 18 percent, depending on the time of day. I've also had my body fat measured more extensively electronically through our health center at my office, and the medical professionals there came up with a figure of 14.7 percent. All that said, I really haven't noticed much definition. I've cut out all the junk from my diet over the past year (I rarely even drink anymore, so I have the nutrition down pat). I do some crunches and the abdominal machine at my office gym, but I guess you really have to focus on the area religiously?
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    Dec 31, 2007 10:00 PM GMT
    Nutrition is the prime factor in being able to see your abs. I say this because you can have rock hard abs but if your diet is crap, you will never see them--Unless you have been blessed with one of those really high metabolisms, but it will eventually catch up to you.
    What many of the previous posters seem to be asking is for an exercise that will burn fat at the abs. This is called spot reduction and it doesn't work. Your body burns fat from all over as it sees fit. Once you have your diet in check, you can do ab exercises, but also work the body as a whole and do some cardio. Increases muscle mass means more energy expended keeping the body going (muscle is metabolically active, fat is not) even at rest. Cardio increases metabolism while you are doing it, and the increase stays with you for a couple hours afterward.
    I prefer to do cardio after my weight training workout so that I have the energy to put into a quality workout session. Ab exercises I like are ab crunches on the stability ball, planks, and hanging leg raises (these technically work the hip flexors, but you need the abs to stablilize).
    I hope this helps to clarify
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    Dec 31, 2007 10:11 PM GMT
    All solid advice...wanted to re-emphasize three things: Nutrition (including cutting alcohal); cardio and weight training (maintaining muscle burns more calories then maintain fat); and don't starve (especially if you are lifting, just eat properly).
    Remember, it does take time...for instance, on most 12 week plans, most visible progress is in the second six weeks...not the first six weeks. Most people get discouraged with their visible progress in the first six weeks and give up. Stick with it, and keep us posted.
    Here's to a healthy 2008
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    Jan 01, 2008 12:29 PM GMT
    How many of you use a weight plate when doing crunches/any other ab exercise for that matter?
    Someone once told me not to, cos that will give you a thick chunky mid-section.

    I just do shitloads of crunches until i can't do anymore. Keeps it flat and slightly visible, but they're not sticking out, like u see on some guys.

    I'm naturally on the thin side, so it's always an effort to gain more weight and size. I think my bodyfat is around 7 per cent.

    I have a tendency to consume a lot of carbs at times cos I just feel so hungry, and feel like I have no energy. maybe that's affecting the definition?!
  • atomohawk

    Posts: 10

    Jan 20, 2008 6:08 PM GMT
    thanx for all of your advice.
    its really helpful.

    i do understand nutrition and how to use it properly.

    so then my next question is:


    part1:

    what form should i use when doing crunches....

    should my feet remain on the floor or should they be at knee height



    part 2:

    does an alternating twist from side to side while doing my crunches help with any other muscles (obliques?, back?)


    part 3:

    what are the benefits and disadvantages of using an exercise ball.



    i guess in a sense, im trying to figure out how to do them properly so i dont look like a fool and also get no results.

    thanx again for all your help
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    Jan 21, 2008 5:03 AM GMT
    To answer your questions:

    1. Should my feet stay on the floor?

    You can do a crunch either way. Proper form would be to either cross your hands over your chest or place your fingers behind your ears--DO NOT LACE YOUR FINGERS BEHIND YOUR HEAD--and then pretend you have an orange under your chin (that space you hold a pillow with when you're putting it in the case) and then curl up trying to touch the orange to your knees. You don't go all the way up, rather keep your lower back on the floor and just your upper torso rises. Hold and then go down. If you want to hold your feet in the air, this makes it a little more difficult since you have to stablilize both ends.

    2. Does an alternating twist from side to side while doing my crunches help with any other muscles?

    In a nutshell:
    Yes. Your rectus abdominus is responsible for flexion at the waist (bending forward). Twisting and bending sideways are handled by the internal and external obliques so any twisting movement will work them.

    3. What are the benefits and disadvantages of using an exercise ball?

    I really like the exercise balls because any unstable surface requires your body to recruit more muscle fibers for balance and stability. I prefer crunches on an exercise ball to the floor because the ball better conforms to your body. Trying to balance requires some focus but your body will figure it out quickly. The wider your stance, the more stable you will be.

    Again I hope this helps
    Mike

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    Jan 21, 2008 9:35 PM GMT
    try doing cable ab crunches and hanging knee raises for variation.

    But like any other muscle group one maybe two exercises per routine is sufficient to target that area
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    Jan 21, 2008 9:43 PM GMT
    No matter how many ab exercises you do your abs will stay invisible unless you are at your ideal weight, and like everyone said --- this all starts with your nutrition and diet.

    Although there is not evidence to support this, I also think having visible abdominals is somewhat genetic.

    My five year old niece has a six pack and we often joke about who's is better.

    I do an actual ab work out MAYBE one day a week. All my core strength comes from pilates, yoga, and believe it or not a spin class.

    With proper technique your core should be activated the entire hour you are on the bike in a spin class, no matter what position. I leave the class with an 8-pack every time

    Good luck!
  • BlackJock79

    Posts: 437

    Jan 25, 2008 5:20 PM GMT
    There is some good advice in here... I was just thinking that I needed to cut back on the ab exercises because my midsection is getting way too thick. I usually work my abs twice a day... everyday. icon_redface.gif I know that's way too much, but I read somewhere that abs were like the one muscle that you could work out everyday. I've been staying on the treadmill for an hour lately though, I burn over 700 calories walking at a 8.0-9.0 incline and then bringing the incline down to a 1.0-2.0 to run. I do intervals like that and go 10 minutes each or 15 minutes one, ten minutes the other etc. I guess I'll just work on burning more fat and not as much working out.
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    Jan 25, 2008 5:55 PM GMT
    Abs are hard to work, but it can be done with good nutrition and ab workouts. Crunches, cable pulldowns, leg raises, leg lifts, and several other lower and upper ab exercises combined with low fat diet plus cardio workouts will get you a 6 pack. Run and do other cardio workouts with your diet and ab exercises--all three are essential to produce results. Good luck!
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    Jan 26, 2008 9:03 AM GMT
    BlackJock79 saidI know that's way too much, but I read somewhere that abs were like the one muscle that you could work out everyday.


    now there are several long answers to your issue about the thickset abs, most of them evolve around body building and the lack of ability for many now to vaccuum. Not being a body builder I wont comment.

    But would point out that your abs do get a workout every day or you would be a jelly laying on the floor. They get worked out on every excercise you perform, wo when concentrating on non core exercises ie anything that involves lifting weight, concentrate on pulling your abs tight when you do them as opposed to letting them do what they want. The strain forces them out. But heck quit complaining Id love thick set abs ;-)

    As to the genetic question, well everyone has abs so it stands to reason everyone can show them, genetics however decides how thick set they are or what degree of body fat you have to drop too to show them.

    Blackjock, thats some serious training time that could be put to good use if all your trying to do is burn calories ;-)
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    Jan 26, 2008 2:01 PM GMT
    my personal trainer has me do my crunches laying over a bosu ball. It allows greater stretching as abs work.
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    Jan 26, 2008 2:48 PM GMT
    Great abs take time and and effort. Everyone can have strong abs, but if you don't eat right and perform just enough cardio to keep your bodyfat down they will never show. Its not the quantity of exercises or reps but the quality and diet plays even a bigger part.icon_biggrin.gif