Serena Fires Back @ Tennis

  • ChilaxinJOCK0...

    Posts: 1513

    Dec 10, 2009 5:15 PM GMT
    After a record fine of 82,000, Serena made it clear that the REAL # is $92,000....

    http://www.gototennisblog.com/2009/12/10/vent-serena-williams-reaches-her-boiling-point-over-us-open-fines/
  • Barricade

    Posts: 457

    Dec 10, 2009 6:19 PM GMT
    I felt bad for her after that match. She was already furious, Kim played an excellent match, and sadly things just spiraled from there. I guess she should be glad they didn't suspend her from any of the majors. Her and Venus are pretty much it for the American women right now. I can't wait for the new season!
  • mascguymia

    Posts: 30

    Dec 10, 2009 9:10 PM GMT
    She's a bitter, sore loser and still has problems accepting responsibility for her own actions. Really a disgrace....

    Can't wait to see Clijsters and Henin start putting her in her place come January...
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    Dec 10, 2009 9:25 PM GMT
    No she's not. She has never had anything but respect for Clijsters. That call was bogus. In the 14 years that she has been a pro she has never done anything like that. I'm not even a huge Serena fan.
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    Dec 10, 2009 10:01 PM GMT
    Ducky46 saidNo she's not. She has never had anything but respect for Clijsters. That call was bogus. In the 14 years that she has been a pro she has never done anything like that. I'm not even a huge Serena fan.


    I agree I saw footage of the call after the incident and indeed she was right to be pissed, just went a bit overboard. When you love something/or a sport that much I guess you can lose yourself easily in the moment.

    She'll get over this hump and continue on. I'll be rooting for her
  • Celticmusl

    Posts: 4330

    Dec 10, 2009 10:26 PM GMT
    She would never feel this way unless she was not deeply, emotionally and personally, involved in the outcome of these events. For her to feel any differently or less passionately would be like asking an eagle not to soar or the sun not to shine. There have been players that are more analytical and reserved to hit the court, but you need passion to become one of the all time greats in this sport.
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    Dec 11, 2009 12:52 AM GMT
    I have no sympathy for her. Sure, she's an athlete deeply involved in her work. But herself and her sister are both sore losers; beside that, you just don't speak to people like that.
  • ChilaxinJOCK0...

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    Dec 11, 2009 4:24 AM GMT
    syd_hockey_79 saidI have no sympathy for her. Sure, she's an athlete deeply involved in her work. But herself and her sister are both sore losers; beside that, you just don't speak to people like that.


    you could say that serenas been a sore loser, but idk about Venus?
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    Dec 11, 2009 4:35 AM GMT
    syd_hockey_79 saidI have no sympathy for her. Sure, she's an athlete deeply involved in her work. But herself and her sister are both sore losers; beside that, you just don't speak to people like that.


    Oh gimme a damn break! Venus a sore loser? Venus is one of the most gracious in defeat or triumph winner on the tour!
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    Dec 11, 2009 5:18 AM GMT
    Celticmusl saidShe would never feel this way unless she was not deeply, emotionally and personally, involved in the outcome of these events. For her to feel any differently or less passionately would be like asking an eagle not to soar or the sun not to shine. There have been players that are more analytical and reserved to hit the court, but you need passion to become one of the all time greats in this sport.


    Well said
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19138

    Dec 11, 2009 5:22 AM GMT
    mrbeachboy saidJust wondering if there are any guys with a Legal background on here that saw this incident with Serena? Seems to me like Serena could have gotten a royal lawsuit slapped on her by threatening that Asian line judge in the manner she did. Anyone have any opinions on that?



    I agree. Serena is a legend in women's tennis, and I have a huge respect for her talent, but she should just shut up, take her fine (she's lucky they didn't also suspend her -- which she deserved) and learn from the experience.
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    Dec 11, 2009 6:14 AM GMT
    I'm not surprised these things happen to her. It's called karma. For a great winner, she's well short of being a true champion. She's rarely ever graceful in defeat, except to her sister. She rarely gives credit to the winner, except to her sister. She's always finding blame in other things for her losses, except to her sister.

    And no tennis match is won or lost because of one bad line call. What about the 30 or 40+ other errors you made in the match to get to that point of having to rely on one line call? It always makes me laugh when I hear NFL commentators blaming a possible errant penalty call for a team's loss. Well, why did that team allow the other team to drive 92 yards down the field to begin with?

    Clearly to me, Serena still does not see her fault in the USO incident. Sure, she apologized. Sure, she claims she wrote a letter of apology. That's for public consumption. I guarantee you, especially after her post-match interview, if she had a choice she would do it again (the match incident, not the apologies).

    Yes, it's justified to get pissed during a match. It's NEVER justified to do what she did because the lineswoman was just doing her job, right or wrong.

  • ChilaxinJOCK0...

    Posts: 1513

    Dec 11, 2009 8:29 PM GMT
    EastCoastNAZ saidI'm not surprised these things happen to her. It's called karma. For a great winner, she's well short of being a true champion. She's rarely ever graceful in defeat, except to her sister. She rarely gives credit to the winner, except to her sister. She's always finding blame in other things for her losses, except to her sister.

    And no tennis match is won or lost because of one bad line call. What about the 30 or 40+ other errors you made in the match to get to that point of having to rely on one line call? It always makes me laugh when I hear NFL commentators blaming a possible errant penalty call for a team's loss. Well, why did that team allow the other team to drive 92 yards down the field to begin with?

    Clearly to me, Serena still does not see her fault in the USO incident. Sure, she apologized. Sure, she claims she wrote a letter of apology. That's for public consumption. I guarantee you, especially after her post-match interview, if she had a choice she would do it again (the match incident, not the apologies).

    Yes, it's justified to get pissed during a match. It's NEVER justified to do what she did because the lineswoman was just doing her job, right or wrong.



    true that...i agree with you. But, Commentators in fball dont really blame things on 1 call tho. When that team was driving those 92 yards they may have come up short on a huge 3rd and 2 and should have been stopped and game over, yet the official will give them an extra yard and that big important defensive moment/stop was destroyed by officials...U never know in a tennis match of that magnitude if maybe Serenas foot fault would have been a point in her favor and all the sudden she turns the match around. Shes done that soooo many times, i dont doubt she coulda done it that night
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    Dec 12, 2009 5:36 PM GMT
    For those of you making excuses for her lack of control, you should rethink about what it is that you describe as passion. Do I sympathize, yes but she still needs to be held responsible for her momentary loss of professionalism. while her history and behavior in the past is nothing like what was displayed during that game. There is no excuse to lash out or call names. Her passion as you call it should have put her in a place that she respected all those that participate to make the sport better, even if you disagree w/ the call. We are all passionate about something. Could you imagine if we all ran around ranting our frustrations.....Oh yeah just read a forum or two.
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    Dec 12, 2009 5:43 PM GMT
    I'm sick of people who rationalize "passion" for "out of control behavior". Or should I say, I'm sick of people who excuse "out of control behavior" for "passion".
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    Dec 12, 2009 5:54 PM GMT
    ahhh wow she's lost it, but she deserves to that stuff is messed up.
  • ChilaxinJOCK0...

    Posts: 1513

    Dec 12, 2009 6:30 PM GMT
    Honestly, no one seems to be giving the lines woman any credit on this site, or the many other tennis blogs I read. Everyone is assuming she made an erroneous call, but it cannot be 100% confirmed due to the camera angle. Serena even said herself in her very ungracious post-match interview that she probably did indeed commit a foot fault. She was called for foot faults I believe 4 times during the 2009 US Open. That is a heck of a lot of "bad foot fault calls" for one tournament. Just maybe, she really did foot fault??? Furthermore, a foot fault is only one point, and not the reason at all why Serena lost that match against Kim Clijsters. First of all, Kim was outplaying Serena in every aspect of that match. Secondly, it was Serena's extremely unsportsmanlike conduct that got her ultimately kicked out of that match (first, her racket smashing in the 1st set, then, her tirade and threat made to the lines woman). So let's give some credit where credit's due: the Lineswoman was doing her job, and her call is correct until it can be confirmed otherwise. Also, Kim Clijsters beat Serena fair and square.[/quote]
    Thats def true...i agree. But a foot fault at that point in the match is so ticky tack anyway. Theres kind of like a cardinal rule in sports , esp tennis, for a call like that at THAT time. Ive never ever ever seen a foot fault called in a tennis match at that time in the match...i thought it was strange. I think she went off like that on purpose...it sucks, but i think she knew she was gonna lose and just figured , fuck it, im going out like a mad diva lol
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    Dec 12, 2009 6:47 PM GMT
    and the cost of being a diva. . $170,000
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    Dec 12, 2009 8:33 PM GMT
    I agree with Serena that the fine was excessive; she is, after all, only human. Her offence was utterly excusable under the circumstances. And oh, how self-righteous some people pretend to be: you'd think they've never blown up at someone out of anger or frustration!

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    Dec 13, 2009 4:02 AM GMT
    "So shaking a tennis racket in someone's face while shouting at them that you are going to "shove this @#$$% ball down their @#%$% throat" is "utterly excusable" because of the circumstances?? Wow dude, you better rethink that logic. That line of circumstantial thinking can justify even the most horrendous of behavior"

    I suppose you've never had a frustrated outburst in your life...you're perfect!!!

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    Dec 13, 2009 1:13 PM GMT
    I think it is important to note that although Serena is primarily an Athlete, she is also a Role Model to girls around the world, so she will be held to a high standard whether she wants to be or not.

    Oh, please....
  • ChilaxinJOCK0...

    Posts: 1513

    Dec 13, 2009 3:58 PM GMT
    Sorry man, but as a tennis teacher and avid player myself I will have to disagree with the common misconception that a foot fault should never be called at an "important" stage of a match. According to this logic, if foot faults should not be called at "important" points of a match, then serves that land out or just clip the net should also be disregarded? No way! A fault is a fault. If a player foot faults, they are essentially committing a service error (fault), the same as serving the ball out. Those are the rules, and it's only fair to both players to enforce them consistently. Ignoring a foot fault at any point during a match is unfair to the receiver, as the server has overstepped the boundaries (baseline), which is against the rules at all points of a tennis match. I tend to get very "passionate" about tennis, so that's why I won't shut up. haha. ;p
    p.s. I agree that Serena was pretty ticked already because she was getting thrashed by a Mommy who has been off the tour for 2 years and was only in the 3rd tournament of her comeback. Ouch...that's gotta hurt that huge ego a tad! lol[/quote]



    i figured thatd be your response because I was thinkin the same thing when I was typing that. I was thinkin someone could def argue that if u cant call a foot fault at that point in the match then why not do away with faults, and line calls and everything else...which is true....I just feel like, I have never EVER seen a foot fault called at that stage in the match, and it was CLOSE...so why even call that. I mean cmon man, im not sayin dont call serves out or clip net, i mean thats OBVIOUS, but a foot fault?

    She def was disgraceful tho, she coulda just stared her down or somethin and talked to the chair ump but being threatening like that only hurts her REP
  • Celticmusl

    Posts: 4330

    Dec 13, 2009 4:15 PM GMT
    EastCoastNAZ saidI'm sick of people who rationalize "passion" for "out of control behavior". Or should I say, I'm sick of people who excuse "out of control behavior" for "passion".


    I'm not using passion as an excuse for behavior. I think it quite logical and rational to understand her "state of mind" at the time. I also have no problem with her being fined, but I do believe she is being treated unfairly, compared to her peers.

    When I was a child I couldn't comprehend why they would even let John McEnroe play a match with his constant temper tantrums. Obviously it was because it made tennis into a spectators sport. If she wanted to sue the powers-that-be for discrimination against women, I think she would have a good case.
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    Dec 13, 2009 5:10 PM GMT
    raindrops saidI think it is important to note that although Serena is primarily an Athlete, she is also a Role Model to girls around the world, so she will be held to a high standard whether she wants to be or not.

    Oh, please....


    "Oh, please", what? If you can't see this as a statement of fact, then that says it all about your narrow-minded point of view.
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    Dec 13, 2009 5:19 PM GMT
    mrbeachboy said
    raindrops saidI agree with Serena that the fine was excessive; she is, after all, only human. Her offence was utterly excusable under the circumstances. And oh, how self-righteous some people pretend to be: you'd think they've never blown up at someone out of anger or frustration!

    To the "haters", watch them (she and her sister) DOMINATE womens' tennis in 2010!!!!!!!!


    So shaking a tennis racket in someone's face while shouting at them that you are going to "shove this @#$$% ball down their @#%$% throat" is "utterly excusable" because of the circumstances?? Wow dude, you better rethink that logic. That line of circumstantial thinking can justify even the most horrendous of behavior.
    Furthermore, merely disagreeing with Serena's actions and the punishment (or lack thereof) she was given does not in any way make one a "hater." I, personally, don't see any "hate" going on in this thread, but if that is what you are looking for, you will certainly find it.

    As far as the William sisters dominating 2010, you better rethink that one too as there are two particular Belgians back on tour that seem to have Serena and Venus' number of late...should be interesting though.


    I think she and her sister should hang up their rackets and get on with the rest of their lives.