Snoring solution needed - I am the culprit!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 11, 2009 3:47 PM GMT
    My man went and slept on the couch last night because I was snoring like a ‘mad truck’ he said in his sleepy state, lol. We laughed about it today, but I know I snore but can’t seem to do anything to calm it down. We arrange for him to fall asleep first, because he is hard to wake up afterwards. But last night was a comedy of night-time errors. I started to drift first, but then finally he got to sleep. My snoring actually woke him up, then the cat kept jumping in him, then he moved to the couch and the cat followed and wouldn’t stop meowing. It was awful, lol.

    Anyway, the long and short of it – What are some real snoring solutions that have worked for you?
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Dec 11, 2009 3:48 PM GMT
    my bf uses those Breathe Right strips, they seem to work well
  • Celticmusl

    Posts: 4330

    Dec 11, 2009 4:07 PM GMT
    There are just two types of guys in this world. Ones that enjoy listening to his mate snore because it makes him feel secure, and the other type that can't fall asleep, has to sleep on a certain side of the bed, can't have a cat or dog on the bed, and thinks silently reading a book in bed is "too loud".

    When I start to get to know a guy one of my first questions is "How do you deal with a partner that snores". It's interesting to hear some of the replies.

    Dump him. icon_wink.gif
  • rdberg1957

    Posts: 662

    Dec 11, 2009 4:16 PM GMT
    Sleep apnea is a lot more common than we knew back in the day. IF you stop breathing while snoring, get checked out. Sleep apnea is associated with excess weight, but you don't have to have excess weight to have it.
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    Dec 11, 2009 4:40 PM GMT
    A few years back I went through the steps for a sleep apnea diagnosis, even spent two nights in a sleep clinic. Naturally, I didn't sleep deeply and didn’t snore much at all. Grrr.
  • Celticmusl

    Posts: 4330

    Dec 11, 2009 5:02 PM GMT
    sleep apnea is a myth, just like "alcoholism" or "addiction". It's a way for the non-snorers to keep us muzzled.
  • gwuinsf

    Posts: 525

    Dec 11, 2009 5:32 PM GMT
    I used to be a pretty heavy snorer. I was always super self-concious about and was always very reticent of having sleep overs until I felt really comfortable with the guy. Both my brother and father have been diagnosed with sleep apnea and now sleep with the CPAP. From what my mother says, it's completely cured his snoring. For me, I just know that CPAP is going to be rough for me. I've always had a hard time breathing through my nose since I was a kid and I'd always wake up with a dry mouth from sleeping and breathing through my map.

    I went to an Ear Nose and Throat specialist to see what my options were. He presented a few surgical options which I did and which I have been very pleased with. He corrected my deviated septum and he did something to shrink my turbinates. I can now breath through both nostrils (before I could only breath through one at a time). I sleep much better and I'm told my snoring is not as loud and not as snorty (which is part of the sleep apnea). I've found my running and cycling to be significantly improved too because I can breath clearly through my nose.

    Sleep apnea is a very dangerous condition. My father was diagnosed with an irregular heart beat that was attributed to the apnea. Basically you're suffocating in your sleep. You should ask your boyfriend next time to check while you are sleeping if you have stopped breathing. That's what the snort snoring is - you have stopped breathing and then your body jerks you into taking in a deep breath.

    At the end of the day, I recommend you find either a really good ENT or a good sleep specialist. By having better breathing in your sleep, you'll also find you'll be getting better quality of sleep.
  • sfjock11

    Posts: 52

    Dec 11, 2009 7:39 PM GMT
    My dad (who is a HUGE snorer) says that snoring is a sign of a "guilt-free conscience" - which I totally agree w/ for obvious reasons. icon_smile.gif
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    Dec 11, 2009 7:50 PM GMT
    l sleep with my arm around him, and give him a squeeze when he starts snoring. Usually it distracts him long enough for me to fall asleep before he starts up again. Oh and I wrap a pillow around my ears, which is pretty effective.
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    Dec 11, 2009 8:45 PM GMT

    When Bill hit 40 he began snoring and it slowly got worse until we caved and turned a room into a second bedroom where I went if I really needed sleep. We still do this as Bill is in great shape, but the Doc had said the only thing left to try was lasering off his uvula. Er, no thanks, you need that little thing to go down and help block access to your breathing pipes when you swallow.

    When Bill hit 48 we made the two rooms thing permanent. We still share our beds (duh), but now we can play 'your place or mine' and I can't begin to tell you how much fun and other creative things *blush* that can be had.


    -Doug
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 11, 2009 8:51 PM GMT
    I only snore when I sleep on my back. My bf is the same way. I've tried Breathe Right strips also. Not convinced they work yet.

    I've seen ads for a mouthpiece that forces your lower jaw to move slightly forward, keeping your air passage open more. I've not done research on its success yet, though I'm interested.
  • jockoman

    Posts: 20

    Dec 11, 2009 10:13 PM GMT
    For your snoring solution, there are a few options you could look into. First and foremost, get a reputable ENT physician--possibly one who specializes in this type of problem. He or she could probably diagnose your problem just by looking into your throat and nasal passages and maybe ordering a head/neck X-ray or MRI. From that point, there are many options. It may be as simple as using a prescription steroidal spray such as Flunisolide Nasal Solution. It seemed to help me with some (but not all) of my symptoms. Of course there's the old dependable, oft-prescribed C-PAP. I personally HATED using this cumbersome, noisy equipment. There are few things in the world that could make a person seem less sexy while they are in bed. It's like a cross between Darth Vader and the elephant man with the trunk included. http://www.joeydevilla.com/2008/04/09/cpap-or-snorkeling-while-i-sleep/

    As another poster had stated, he got his deviated septum fixed (OUCH!!) and his turbinates shrunken down to a manageable, breathable size. There are other surgical options. A guy I dated had his uvula removed and part of his soft palate. Unfortunately, it did not seem to help much. Sometimes the pesky soft palate will simply grow back. Another guy I know tried the soft palate excision as well. Since it did not seem to relieve his symptoms either, he finally had his upper and lower jawbones broken, rewired, and moved forward to make more room in his narrow airway. OUCH! OUCH! OUCH! I do not think I could go through all that drama, but the extreme surgery seems to have worked for him.

    Good luck! Hope this helped. icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 11, 2009 10:58 PM GMT
    chloroform

  • inuman

    Posts: 733

    Dec 12, 2009 12:19 AM GMT
    I have sleep apnea as well and it is not as bad as I thought, I sleep on my right side and I can sleep well and might snore a little but on my back or left side, no way. The strip didn't help at all, I bought this pillow that helped for a while but it too didn't last, like many aliments with the body, there are many "cures" out there. Best bet is to find a good ENT specialist, sleep centres fine but I just recorded myself a few nights and had the ENT review the DVD I made of myself snoring. He said I breath fine on my right side, there were options of surgery and he said the strips do little to no good at all. I opted for the sleeping on the right side of my body and have been fine since.

    Don't make a big deal about it, get him ear plugs, it's what my guys uses if we had a long day. I wake when the alarm goes and wake him, so it works. icon_cool.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 12, 2009 12:32 AM GMT
    As someone who is a bit overly scientific, I admit that I love homeopathy, cause it's so loony when you look at it logically, but from personal and anecdotal experience, as well as controlled studies, it does work for a lot of people, with a respectable margin of success (i.e. it beats random by a statistically significant amount).

    There's a homeopathic thing for snoring called Snorestop, which I've used and dammit, it actually worked for me. I'm dumbfounded as to why, but hey, it's not that expensive, so maybe you should give it a whirl.

    http://www.drugstore.com/search/search_results.asp?Ntk=All&srchtree=5&Ntt=snorestop&aid=336064&aparam=snorestop&scinit1=snorestop
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 12, 2009 4:59 AM GMT
    I had a deviated septum corrected and my uvula and soft palate lasered. The septum was horribly painful. Some people say it works just be forewarned.

    I still snore heavily. It ruined my last relationship.



  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 12, 2009 5:36 AM GMT
    how the f*** does snoring ruin a relationship???

    My ex snored, pretty badly on occasion and I take forever to get off to sleep, but its not something you break up with someone over unless your interest in them is so slim already that you shouldn't have bothered trying in the first place.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 12, 2009 9:12 AM GMT
    I only snore if I sleep on my back, and luckily I prefer to sleep on my side, so it has never been much of a problem. But I do think that, as some posts suggested, people who go into deep sleep have a greater tendency to snore.
    I don't know what I'd do if I had a partner that snored, because I really miss sleeping with someone, but that's a tough situation.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 13, 2009 6:56 PM GMT
    I think I am going to give the snore stop a try. I think along the same lines as you regarding homeopathy, but for $13 I'll give it a try. First I want to see if these strips I bought yesterday work for me.
  • Puppy80

    Posts: 451

    Dec 13, 2009 7:40 PM GMT
    My boyfriend is convinced I have sleep apnea and my snoring is pretty bad. One night I was staying with him he recorded some of it on my phone and when played back, it was pretty horrifying the noise I was making. I don't know why I haven't gotten to the doctor to have it checked out.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 13, 2009 10:11 PM GMT
    lilTanker saidhow the f*** does snoring ruin a relationship???

    My ex snored, pretty badly on occasion and I take forever to get off to sleep, but its not something you break up with someone over unless your interest in them is so slim already that you shouldn't have bothered trying in the first place.



    Actually Tank, it's more common than you would think as absurd as it sounds. The lack of sound sleep will begin to harbour unspoken stress that will begin trickling into other areas of the relationship.

    Many therapists will concur.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 15, 2009 4:25 PM GMT
    The strips were a mediocre success. The man said i snored considerably less. Some days I don’t snore at all I should add, so I need to give these a go for a while and see if there is a consistent impact.
  • Tiran

    Posts: 227

    Dec 19, 2009 2:05 AM GMT
    My boyfriend has occasionally gone to sleep on the couch because of my snoring. He bought a jar of stuff called snore no more or essence of marjoram, which is a sponge soaked in essential oils, mostly marjoram and eucalyptus. You just open it and leave it near the bed. He says I snore less. Your milage may vary.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 19, 2009 2:22 AM GMT
    Within the last year, I started snoring a bit. I spoke to my doctor buddy, who said it's likely caused (for my situation) by my chin dropping towards my chest, thereby constricting the airway (try looking down at your toes, and you'll feel your airway get crunched.)

    For me, he recommended rolling up a hand towel, putting that in the pillow under my neck, to give better support for the back of my neck, better alignment, and prevent my chin from drooping towards my chest.

    Low and behold, no more snoring! Hubby hasn't heard a snore out of me since the towel went into the pillow, so we're both happy again. All he has to put up with is my constant talking in my sleep, but he's used to that (which I think is more creepy!)

    Good luck!
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Dec 19, 2009 2:24 AM GMT
    Snoring is in our DNA. Snoring scares away the animals in the night.

    But, more helpfully, it might be a positional thing. When any of us sleep on our back, we snore. Our throat relaxes and our tounge slide back there the noise is involuntary.Push the offender over so he's semiprone, then grab him by the hair and yank hard, for no reason other than for that last time he pissed you off, well ok it also opens his airway but that's not so rewarding. You should be snorefree after that.