RJ buddhists

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    Dec 17, 2009 4:50 PM GMT
    Are there any?
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    Dec 17, 2009 5:05 PM GMT
    Of all the world's major religions I am probably most attracted to Buddhism. The Buddhist I've met are the nicest kindest people I've ever meet. The more seriously they take their religion the more positive and developed they seem to be (I can't say that about other religious followers). I couldn't say I am a Buddhist though. Maybe a Buddhist dabbler.
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    Dec 17, 2009 8:39 PM GMT
    Peeks into dark, empty RJ forum auditorium with Lostboy...

    "Hallllooooo? Anyone in there?"

    * makes dejected face *

    I think there might be an inverse correlation between posting on RJ forums and being a Buddhist.

    I think there's at least one RJ Buddhist on here. I think he's DREEEEAAAAMMMMYYYYYY.....

    http://www.realjock.com/BuddhasDream

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    Dec 17, 2009 9:38 PM GMT
    I identify as a secular humanist but I have been very interested in buddhism in the past and studied it quite a bit. I was majorly put off when the Dalai Lama came out with that homophobic crap a number of years back and I'm skeptical when it comes to reincarnation and all that. But the concepts of Buddhism make a lot of sense and mindfulness and living in the present and letting go of desire are still useful constructs.
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    Dec 17, 2009 9:48 PM GMT
    I´m kinda guessing that Metta is...

    I´m more "influenced" than actually... and I´m a sort of eclectic Zen Taoist more than an orthodox anything (though Zen/Taoist syncretism has a very long and noble pedigree in china)
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    Dec 17, 2009 10:07 PM GMT
    Lostboy saidI´m kinda guessing that Metta is...

    I´m more "influenced" than actually... and I´m a sort of eclectic Zen Taoist more than an orthodox anything (though Zen/Taoist syncretism has a very long and noble pedigree in china)


    I loved learning about Buddhism and Tao/Zen practices in college! Would like to learn more and have begun to study how to bring elements of the beliefs into daily life. Since starting to work principles in, I have found life more rewarding and engaging every day.

    Not sure about reincarnation personally, but I definitely fell head over heels for the notion of being in harmony with humanity and nature.
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    Dec 17, 2009 10:11 PM GMT
    Hehehe... Not many of us on here, then? As it turns out, I'm a pretty devout Zen Buddhist (Soto sect, with a hint of Rinzai influence.)

    We're not exactly a common species. Fitness-obsessed gay Buddhists, I mean. Or at least I don't think we're a common species. I'm willing to be wrong. icon_biggrin.gif
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    Dec 17, 2009 10:26 PM GMT
    I've studdied both theravada and mahayana for errr a few years now, I wish I could dedicate more time to it, but with everything else going on it pushes things like this out.
  • treader

    Posts: 238

    Dec 18, 2009 12:58 AM GMT

    Yes, I have been practicing at a Vipassana center near me (which recently had a gay night which was absolutely packed). I was raised Catholic but moved on for obvious reasons. I do find many positive benefits in Buddhism but it's certainly not perfect. It is fascinating to observe your own mind. I got into yoga as well through Buddhism. It is something that I would like to focus more on in 2010.
  • bishop65

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    Dec 18, 2009 1:59 AM GMT
    Nichiren Buddhist here....
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    Dec 18, 2009 2:21 AM GMT
    I agree with the 4 noble truths for the most part .. I don't care for the 4th noble truth as I think it is contrived to say that eight things make for a good path for everyone:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Noble_Truths#Pali_and_Chinese_canon_text 1. The Nature of Suffering (Dukkha):
    "This is the noble truth of suffering: birth is suffering, aging is suffering, illness is suffering, death is suffering; sorrow, lamentation, pain, grief and despair are suffering; union with what is displeasing is suffering; separation from what is pleasing is suffering; not to get what one wants is suffering; in brief, the five aggregates subject to clinging are suffering."
    2. Suffering's Origin (Samudaya):
    "This is the noble truth of the origin of suffering: it is this craving which leads to renewed existence, accompanied by delight and lust, seeking delight here and there, that is, craving for sensual pleasures, craving for existence, craving for extermination."
    3. Suffering's Cessation (Nirodha):
    "This is the noble truth of the cessation of suffering: it is the remainderless fading away and cessation of that same craving, the giving up and relinquishing of it, freedom from it, nonreliance on it."
    4. The Way (Magga) Leading to the Cessation of Suffering:
    "This is the noble truth of the way leading to the cessation of suffering: it is the Noble Eightfold Path; that is, right view, right intention, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, right concentration."

    I am more inclined towards Taoist philosophy which is more based on observation, abstraction, and nature. These are things you can realize through contemplation. I like the insights that it gives me. Here are some of the principle ideas in Taoism from wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taoism :
    Tao: The Way .. the totality of all things seen and unseen. Everything come from the Tao and reflects it in some way.
    Te: "power; virtue; integrity", that is, the active expression of Tao
    Wu wei : "without action" or Wei wu Wei which is paradoxically action through no action. Sometimes called effortless doing .. nature works that way .. efficient action without effort.
    P'u : usually seen as keeping oneself in the primordial state of tao. It is believed to be the true nature of the mind, unburdened by knowledge or experiences. In the state of p'u, there is no right or wrong, beautiful or ugly. There is only pure experience, or awareness, free from learned labels and definitions. It is this state of being that is the goal of following wu wei.
    I would throw in the utility of emptiness (Wu) from which paradoxically something can be derived from nothing.
  • New_Life

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    Dec 18, 2009 2:36 AM GMT
    Nichiren Daishonin's Buddhism
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    Dec 18, 2009 7:15 AM GMT
    There are many Buddhist philosophies and practices that seem to jive well with what I am and what I understand. I will investigate and hope to incorporate it more fully as my life moves forward.
  • NursePractiti...

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    Dec 18, 2009 7:23 AM GMT
    I'm one and I've met a few others on here also.
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    Dec 18, 2009 7:26 AM GMT
    not buddhist, but i work with buddhist deities. does that count?
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    Dec 18, 2009 8:56 AM GMT
    A Therevada Buddhist here, born and raised and still am. I am by no mean a religious person, but I do apply Buddhist beliefs in my life. From what I know and understand, Buddhism just makes sense of things in my life.

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    Dec 18, 2009 9:11 AM GMT
    yes, since my early 20's.
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    Dec 18, 2009 9:27 AM GMT
    I've been invited from this lady I met at Books A Million to join this Buddhist group and I'm actually thinking about it. I think it would be nice to get a different perspective on life and see how they see.
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    Dec 23, 2009 2:16 PM GMT
    seekerofdivinity saidHehehe... Not many of us on here, then? As it turns out, I'm a pretty devout Zen Buddhist (Soto sect, with a hint of Rinzai influence.)

    We're not exactly a common species. Fitness-obsessed gay Buddhists, I mean. Or at least I don't think we're a common species. I'm willing to be wrong. icon_biggrin.gif


    I´d guess that the more fitness interested buddhists and buddhist like guys would be into yoga rather than lifting. It´s just un-enlightened ones like me who want a six pack and to tame the monkey mind.
  • jeffreyr

    Posts: 43

    Dec 23, 2009 3:08 PM GMT
    [quote][cite] want a six pack and to tame the monkey mind. [/quote]

    LOL, that's what I want! Although I don't have your six-pack, I'm working on it, but more importantly, I've been getting very much into Buddhism the past 6 months or so. Would love to talk mroe about it anytime. I'm trying to figure out how to connect with other buddhists to sortof build up a buddhist support structure, people to talk to and re-inforce the ideas. I've found it to be a great, new thing to introduce into my life.
  • jeffreyr

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    Dec 23, 2009 3:10 PM GMT
    dashdashdash saidI've studdied both theravada and mahayana for errr a few years now, I wish I could dedicate more time to it, but with everything else going on it pushes things like this out.


    I totally understand that. About six months ago, I was at a point where I really needed to put everything on hold and start to focus on myself. I have a lifetime to go, but I've actually found that taking out time to focus on this, has made me more effective in my daily life.
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    Dec 23, 2009 3:12 PM GMT
    I don't practice, but if someone were to ask me what religion I was I'd say buddhist.




    I need to start a meditation routine, but just haven't yet.
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    Dec 23, 2009 3:13 PM GMT
    Lostboy said
    seekerofdivinity saidHehehe... Not many of us on here, then? As it turns out, I'm a pretty devout Zen Buddhist (Soto sect, with a hint of Rinzai influence.)

    We're not exactly a common species. Fitness-obsessed gay Buddhists, I mean. Or at least I don't think we're a common species. I'm willing to be wrong. icon_biggrin.gif


    I´d guess that the more fitness interested buddhists and buddhist like guys would be into yoga rather than lifting. It´s just un-enlightened ones like me who want a six pack and to tame the monkey mind.
    hey, you only get on body this time around, and it should be nice and healthy. icon_biggrin.gif
  • pandx970

    Posts: 357

    Dec 28, 2009 4:26 AM GMT
    nichiren buddhist practicing with the SGI-USA...heh...i hope at least one other person gets this next part...rocking the era!
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    Dec 29, 2009 4:09 PM GMT
    Lostboy said
    seekerofdivinity saidHehehe... Not many of us on here, then? As it turns out, I'm a pretty devout Zen Buddhist (Soto sect, with a hint of Rinzai influence.)

    We're not exactly a common species. Fitness-obsessed gay Buddhists, I mean. Or at least I don't think we're a common species. I'm willing to be wrong. icon_biggrin.gif


    I´d guess that the more fitness interested buddhists and buddhist like guys would be into yoga rather than lifting. It´s just un-enlightened ones like me who want a six pack and to tame the monkey mind.


    Hehehe...well, Buddhist temples refined several martial arts styles, so I'd say they might not be entirely opposed to a six pack. icon_wink.gif

    Personally, I think mindful exercise is far more intense and rewarding. I try not to even listen to the radio when doing cardio work. (Instead, I focus on my movement.) icon_razz.gif