Death Penalty Factoid

  • Squarejaw

    Posts: 1035

    Jan 03, 2008 8:09 PM GMT
    I already knew that Texas led the nation in executions.
    I wasn't aware, however, that it also led the nation in wrongfully-convicted prisoners exonerated by DNA testing.

    That's a pretty sobering juxtaposition.
    http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/01/03/dna.exoneration.ap/index.html
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    Jan 03, 2008 9:32 PM GMT
    Also, for any Texans out there in Houston (Harris County)

    http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/dn/opinion/editorials/stories/DN-harris_28edi.ART.State.Edition1.423c1e1.html

    Interesting list there on the bottom of that page.

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    Jan 03, 2008 9:37 PM GMT
    Um, Squarejaw, do you really think that's a coincidence? Could it be that in their rush to keep death row occupied they really don't give a crap about the guilt or innocence of the parties they slap in there?

    Especially when Chief Justice Rehnquist said, essentially, that actual innocence should not be an absolute bar to execution, when a convict's procedural appeals have been exhausted.

    Texas...Saudi Arabia...both have oil...both like to execute people...both have fundamentalists...hmmmmmmmm
  • jarhead5536

    Posts: 1348

    Jan 03, 2008 11:39 PM GMT
    Texas is still the wild west, at least on paper. The penal code is from before Texas was even a Mexican territory, and not much has changed. Plus they have that whole macho bullshit gun-totin we don't need no damn judge string'im up mentality going on. Stealing a horse is still a capital offense there...

    Speaking as an expat Texan, mind you...
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    Jan 04, 2008 12:02 AM GMT
    It's very disturbing, but the most shocking thing to me is very existence of a Conviction Integrity Unit in Dallas county. Maybe there is hope that some progress is being made in what has been routinely identified as one of the most bigoted and fundamentally flawed court systems in the country.
  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Jan 04, 2008 10:26 AM GMT
    In a state that gave us George W Bush .... are you guys really surprised?
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    Jan 04, 2008 1:00 PM GMT
    I think they should throw the woman who gave false testimony in jail at least half the time served by the guy.
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    Jan 04, 2008 3:41 PM GMT
    GQjock saidIn a state that gave us George W Bush .... are you guys really surprised?


    Uhhh... what does Florida have to do with this?

    Squarejaw saidI already knew that Texas led the nation in executions.
    I wasn't aware, however, that it also led the nation in wrongfully-convicted prisoners exonerated by DNA testing.

    That's a pretty sobering juxtaposition.


    Molly Ivins didn't refer to Texas as the "National Laboratory for Bad Government" for no reason. Lordy do I miss her.
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    Jan 04, 2008 3:45 PM GMT
    I'm game, what do you mean? George Bush never lived in or held office in Florida. Are you thinking of his big brother, the repulsive Jeb?
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    Jan 04, 2008 3:58 PM GMT
    jprichva saidI'm game, what do you mean? George Bush never lived in or held office in Florida. Are you thinking of his big brother, the repulsive Jeb?


    It was an 2000 election joke. Remember? Florida ended up being the deciding state.
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    Jan 04, 2008 4:03 PM GMT
    Ooops.

    Sorry, webinfront, I'm not up to par today.
    That was funny, you're right.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14371

    Jan 05, 2008 6:33 PM GMT
    I lived in Texas for almost ten years and from what I remember it was one of the most intolerant states in the country. It led in executions which well represents its total intolerance and ignorance. Yet much of the state suffered from high crime rates. Especially cities like Dallas, Fort Worth, Houston, El Paso, and San Antonio had very high rates of violent crime during the 90s. Many smaller cities like Amarillo, Beaumont, and Waco also had high crime rates as well. That just goes to show you that the death penalty really does not work in preventing violent crime from occuring. From the way some of these tough, law and order neoconservatives talk, you are led to believe that the death penalty is an automatic cure-all for violent crime. That is just not true.
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    Jan 05, 2008 6:46 PM GMT
    The notion that the death penalty is cure all is sickening. It erases any value there may be in a prisoners value in their life. The value of life is the foremost value there is - you erase that and every other value (in that hierarchy) breaks down. No wonder Texas has such high crime rates.