What are you reading?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 04, 2008 4:54 PM GMT
    Greetings to all,

    Just curious to know what books other members are currently reading. This may be an odd topic for this forum but it's said, "Reading is to the mind what exercise is to the body"

    I myself am not a habitual reader but when I do get a good book, it’s hard not to finish it.

    I'm currently reading "The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho" and would highly recommend it. It's a great book and one that I’m sure to finish. This book is a fable about following your dream. Google the name of the book and you’ll come across several reviews.

    Any recommendations about a book that you may have liked or which had an impact on you?

    Cheers.
  • Squarejaw

    Posts: 1035

    Jan 04, 2008 7:31 PM GMT
    "The Known World" by Edward P. Jones. It's a novel centered on several free blacks in the South and the slaves that they own. It's more character and anecdote than plot, but it's a compelling page-turner nonetheless. It's also on the NYTimes list of the best American fiction from the past 25 years.
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    Jan 04, 2008 7:41 PM GMT
    "Never Let Me Go" by Kazuo Ishiguro. Near-future science fiction (don't let that scare you) that is absolutely beautiful and heartbreaking. Some of the finest prose I've read in years. I don't want to spoil it for anyone, but I highly recommend checking it out!
  • jarhead5536

    Posts: 1348

    Jan 04, 2008 8:15 PM GMT
    Democracy in America by Tomas de Tocqueville.
  • BlackJock79

    Posts: 437

    Jan 04, 2008 8:23 PM GMT
    Squarejaw said"The Known World" by Edward P. Jones. It's a novel centered on several free blacks in the South and the slaves that they own. It's more character and anecdote than plot, but it's a compelling page-turner nonetheless. It's also on the NYTimes list of the best American fiction from the past 25 years.


    Holy crap I'm reading that book too! I'm only in the first chapter though... That jerk off in rain while in the woods is a hot scene... LOL
  • BlackJock79

    Posts: 437

    Jan 04, 2008 8:23 PM GMT
    I'm also reading "The Innocent Man" by John Grisham.
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    Jan 05, 2008 12:13 AM GMT
    "One Mississippi" by Mark Childress hits close to home for me.
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    Jan 05, 2008 12:36 AM GMT
    Mistral's Kiss by Laurell K. Hamilton and I Heard God Laughing a collection of poems by Hafiz as translated by Daniel Ladinsky
  • irishboxers

    Posts: 357

    Jan 05, 2008 1:43 AM GMT
    East of Eden, by John Steinbeck.
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    Jan 05, 2008 2:47 AM GMT
    "The Lightning Thief," I have to go upstairs to find the author. Good book about about a kid who's father is a Greek god, literally.

    "David Balfor," by Robert Louis Stevenson, the sequel to "Kidnapped." Really good books written in that old style, lots of Scottish accents.

    Frank
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    Jan 05, 2008 2:57 AM GMT
    "The Beatles: The Biography" by Bob Spitz. Over 800 can't-wait-to-turn pages.
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    Jan 05, 2008 3:36 AM GMT
    Currently I'm reading WATCHMEN, its a comic that was listed as TIME magazine's best 100 novels.
    Good, but very dark. If you're going to read it, make sure you read every page, and don't be tempted to skip ahead.
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    Jan 05, 2008 3:38 AM GMT
    "City Life" by Witold Rybczynski

    A good asessment of American cities, why they came to be how they are, and thoughts on their future. It's a good read for the thoughtful urban dweller in many of us.

    ...but nobody likes my books. Too much nonfiction. Hardly big fun.
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    Jan 05, 2008 3:49 AM GMT
    I just finished (re)reading "The Great Gatsby" and now (OH boy, I'm good look like the biggest mo) I'm starting "Kate: The Woman Who was Hepburn."
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    Jan 05, 2008 4:14 AM GMT
    I am currently reading 3 books. It is not for school or anyhting. I just like to read. One of my books can get really boring so I will switch and read an interesting book for a chapter or two. Then go back to the boring one.

    The boring book is called "Art & Physics: Parallel Visions in Space, Time, and Light" by Leonard Shlain. I guess boring is a bad word. I enjoy the book because I learn a lot from it, but I can only red so much before my mind wonders. The book is about how art and Physics are closely related through all centuries. I am just in the beginning and it is becoming more and more interesting how he has connected the two poler opposites.

    The interesting book is also by Leonard Shlain called "Sex, Time and Power: How Women's Sexuality Shaped Human Evolution." It is an interesting book about the Quid Pro Quo relationship between man and woman. There is a chapter or two on homosexuality, but I have not read it yet. It is a book that I will read many times because I love the information it gives.

    My third book is a research book "The Rough Guide to South America." I am reading it because I am planning on backpacking through South America next year.

    As for recommendations... One of my guilty pleasures is a the novel called "The Pirates! In an Adventure with Scientist" by Gideon Defoe. It is one of the only book I have laughed out loud at. I love it. It is full of "British humor." The humor is not for everyone though.
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    Jan 25, 2008 1:42 AM GMT
    I am a huge reader, I find that is lets me escape the world while still keeping my bearings. I am currently reading four books.

    "A Brief History of Nearly Everything." I am at a coffee shop right now, so i don't know the author. Horribly fascinating! Full of odd humor and amazing facts. i recommend it to anyone.

    "It." by stephen king. I should say rereading, this is an amazing book. I've read it three times. he thrusts his fists against the posts and still insists he sees the ghosts It is nothing like the movie, I highly recommend it to anyone that is not already frightened by clowns.

    "Howl's Moving Castle." Just started this, really good so far.

    "Tornado in a Junkyard" it is a non-fiction about the evolution myths(or junk) that mainstream humanity has been fed. Truth be told, it is excellent and has completely changed the way I view the world.

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    Jan 25, 2008 2:05 AM GMT
    "The Satanic Verses"

    it's ok, I think it'd help if I was more educated about Islam.

    It's probably not so bad that I'd go kill someone about it though.
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    Jan 25, 2008 2:14 AM GMT
    I was challenged to read "Finnigans Wake"
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    Jan 25, 2008 2:15 AM GMT
    Blind Faith by Ben Elton
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    Jan 25, 2008 2:24 AM GMT
    This week, I'm re-reading Joane Vinge's "Cat" series. I don't think I've read them back-to-back before, and the style makes a little more sense, since I've learned that she wrote the first book when she was only 16.

    Also, "Special Topics In Calamity Physics," by Marisha Pessl, and "Stripping Analysis: Principles, Instrumentation, and Applications," by Joseph Wang, which is a lot less prurient than you might think, since it is actually about electrochemical methods.

    BTW: Last night I FINALLY got around to installing built-in lights into the headboard of my bed. (I've been meaning to for at least 20 years.) A nice even LED illumination all the way across. Celebrated by staying awake half the night reading!
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    Jan 25, 2008 2:28 AM GMT
    "It Never Rains In Tiger Stadium".
    Yeah, it's a jock book about football.icon_eek.gif
  • shoelessj

    Posts: 511

    Jan 25, 2008 2:32 AM GMT
    i just finished 'here's what we'll say,' by reichen lemkuhl. it was pretty good,not especially well-written/edited, but an interesting glimpse at life (and gay life) at the USAFA.

    currently reading 'imperial hubris' and 'woman of the house'[a nancy pelosi biography] on the bus/train, and 'permanent partners,' by betty berzon, at home.

    the 800 lb. gorilla i still haven't finished is doris kearns goodwin's lincoln book.

    i like biographies.

    and 'city life' was great.
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    Jan 25, 2008 2:47 AM GMT
    I always read books, Im currently reading Dean Koontz "The Good Guy".
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    Jan 25, 2008 2:54 AM GMT
    makeumyne said"The Satanic Verses"

    it's ok, I think it'd help if I was more educated about Islam.

    It's probably not so bad that I'd go kill someone about it though.


    It's not bad at all, it's very funny. Actually, when you read it, you'll see what pissed off the Ayatollah AND Cat Stevens...(hint: it had nothing to do with Islam or Mohammed).

    I don't want to spoil it for you.
    If anyone is curious, email me and I'll tell you.
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    Jan 26, 2008 5:13 PM GMT
    Just finished two gay teen detective novels by Josh Aterovis. "Bleeding Hearts" and "Reap The Whirlwind" both very good. I am going to read "War Against The Animals" by Paul Russell and "Where The Boys Are" by William Mann next, as well as a collection of gay short stores from Britain called "The Next Wave".