Returning to gym routine after 10 month break - thoughts on supplements?

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    Dec 29, 2009 7:44 PM GMT
    I started seriously working on my fitness in 2004 when I was 36. Over the next 5 years, through cardio and weight training, as well as sports, I became much more athletic with a good physique (see my profile).

    This past year I moved back to the USA from having lived in London for 12 years. I pretty much had to start over again and build a new life here. This is still in process but I am just about to the point where I can join a gym and get back to a normal workout routine.

    Now that it has been 10 months since i've seen the inside of a gym, I am looking for ways to really kick start my metabolism and muscle building process again once I return.

    I previously have supplemented with Creatine and some various multi-vitamin and protein supplements with fairly decent results.

    I was wondering what other people are using now and which supplements are or have been the most effective?
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    Dec 29, 2009 9:07 PM GMT
    I would just start by eating right, and conditioning exercises .. nothing too heavy for a month or so. I wouldn't look to supplements other than good nutrition at this point. You need to know what you are capable of on your own before you figure out what you might need beyond that.

    There is no magic pill for proper self-motivation.
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    Dec 29, 2009 10:23 PM GMT
    agreed. your supplement for the first month should be getting back into the habit of going regularly and not injuring yourself by trying to start up where you left off. It will come back quite fast, but dont´push it.

    eat well, work out consistently.
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    Dec 29, 2009 11:09 PM GMT
    Lostboy's workout tips are always good.

    However, if you're new to New Orleans you'll need to take some additional steps to deal with the local hazards. Do major extra cardio to burn off the wonderful but ultra-high-calorie food you won't be able to resist having.
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    Dec 30, 2009 4:40 PM GMT
    Great Advice all above. Most of that is simply a review of what I already know but its refreshing to hear reinforcement of those points.

    Though I was more curious as to find out if there were supplements or other info that have come to light more recently that have made a difference in people's workouts.

    The biggest two issues I always had were severe doms and slow gains despite closely monitoring diet and trying to keep the routine fresh. I haven't ever had much of a problem getting very lean with high intensity bursts of cardio (at one point my body fat was down to 7% or so) but muscle growth has always been slow going as i'm typically an ectomorph (long torso, lightly muscled, narrow shouldered). So while I always found cutting phases to be very effective, I found bulking gains to be slow and extremely difficult. However, I do not want to compromise my ability to stay lean in order to build muscle. I am aware that my metabolism is not what it once was in terms of fast fat burning, though for my age it is pretty good...
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    Dec 30, 2009 4:53 PM GMT
    I am in exactly the same boat as you!
    I have been in US for 10 months, not ever set foot inside a gym yet!!!

    I am thinking of joining my local WSC, and am thinking that anything is better than nothing, but does anyone have any input on gyms, as well as supps etc to get me going.

    If I had to guess, I would say I have 30lbs to shift
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    Dec 30, 2009 5:14 PM GMT
    Look, think of food supplements as icing on the cake. Most people are FAR better off concentrating on the "cake" of
    (1) Good diet
    (2) regular, intelligent training
    (3) adequate physical and mental rest

    supplements are a distraction until you have these right, or 99% right. Until then your effort is much better directed towards the "low tech" answer: eat well, train well, sleep.

    The two main tools that are useful which did not exist 100 years ago are protein supplements (whey shakes) and creatine. Neither is magic: the extra protein is just an easier way of getting the nutritional needs you have met, and the creatine is a way of being able to increase the intensity of your training (you can lift heavier).

    Now, if you are working at elite level there are all sorts of potions and stuff, but 95% plus of all benefits can be got with the low technology. And, frankly, we don´t need that extra 5%. Use that time and money for other things. And it´s not me saying this, it was the advice given me by an acquaintance who is an ex international athlete and now coaches an olympic athlete. The high tech stuff just makes you feel you are special. Save the money, use your brain instead.



    Also, to the OP. You seem to have a similar "problem" to me, and I think part of the solution is to reconsider the ideal physique we are presented with. BIG as beautiful is a fairly new thing in body building: if you look back 75 or 100 years ago it was not like that. A leaner, smaller body, if it is balanced, is really exceptionally attractive. Very different from the Arnie Ideal, and much more appealing. Go Greek!

    I cite my fav example, Tony Sansone

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    Dec 30, 2009 5:51 PM GMT
    [quote]Also, to the OP. You seem to have a similar "problem" to me, and I think part of the solution is to reconsider the ideal physique we are presented with. BIG as beautiful is a fairly new thing in body building: if you look back 75 or 100 years ago it was not like that. A leaner, smaller body, if it is balanced, is really exceptionally attractive. Very different from the Arnie Ideal, and much more appealing. Go Greek!

    I cite my fav example, Tony Sansone[/quote]

    Interesting suggestion and a fascinating example. The man was simply gorgeous and lived to be 82. I read up a bit on him just now. He looked to be mesomorphic and could easily build lean muscle despite not lifting heavy. Even to get close to the type of physique he had it takes a tremendous amount of effort for me and I begin to quickly revert back to my default build if I slow down or stop for more than a few months. It now looks as though I will not be able to return to the gym for another 4 to 5 months as there are other financial priorities looming. I will have to do the best I can with a set of dumb-bells and a pull-up bar for now...
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    Dec 30, 2009 6:16 PM GMT
    Many gyms have rates as low as $10.00 month.

    It sometimes pays to shop around, be persistent, in healthy lifestyle options.
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    Dec 30, 2009 9:03 PM GMT
    The point is rather the different ideal. Even if you don´t reach the ideal, having a different aesthetic (and frankly a much nicer one) is a help. Also think of dancers....


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    I don´t find the short, roidy, overly muscular, modern body builder types nice to look at.



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    Dec 30, 2009 9:17 PM GMT
    Okay sorry. Off topic.
    ...but why did you move back to the U.S. from London?
    What does the U.S. have that London doesn't?
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    Dec 30, 2009 9:21 PM GMT
    play_dead saidOkay sorry. Off topic.
    ...but why did you move back to the U.S. from London?
    What does the U.S. have that London doesn't?


    read his profile.
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    Dec 31, 2009 1:34 AM GMT
    Lostboy said
    play_dead saidOkay sorry. Off topic.
    ...but why did you move back to the U.S. from London?
    What does the U.S. have that London doesn't?


    read his profile.


    Yes I read it before I posted it.
    I just don't understand why someone would leave one continent to come to another (less accepting one) just because he ended his LTR.
    There are plenty of eligible bachelors in the UK... and to LA of all places icon_smile.gif
    New York I can understand. icon_wink.gif