How oatmeal lowers cholesterol?

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    Jan 01, 2010 3:49 AM GMT
    I have heard the claim that oatmeal does this, but never knew how it does it.

    Well, I just watched the third lecture in the course Nutrition Made Clear entitled: Our Underappreciated Digestive Tract. It is just an overview of the digestion from mouth to ass. Anyway, the instructor explains that the liver makes bile that is store in the gall bladder and used to emulsify the water and fat as it enters the small intestine. Bile is 70% cholesterol. Normally, the body would reabsorb and recycle that cholesterol. The fiber in oatmeal binds with the bile in the small intestine, preventing it from being reabsorbed. Attached to the fiber, it is eliminated from the body, taking its cholesterol with it. This makes it necessary for the liver to take cholesterol out of the blood to make more bile, reducing the cholesterol in the blood.

    Pretty neat, huh? I really like understanding how these things work so I can really accept claims, such as oatmeal lowers your cholesterol.
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    Jan 01, 2010 4:14 PM GMT
    Yep. Oatmeal lowers your cholesterol. In fact, any soluble fiber will.

    This has been well documented for many years.

    Oatmeal should be part of a sensible diet.
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    Jan 01, 2010 4:15 PM GMT
    That is sweet to learn! The health class I took in college touched on this, but wasn't as great at explaining why my morning meal helped keep my heart functioning. Thank you for sharing and the link!
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    Jan 01, 2010 6:12 PM GMT
    I am not sure any soluble fiber will help. I am still research this.

    In oatmeal, it is beta-glucan that binds to the bile. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oatmeal#Breakfast_cereal_health_benefits

    And, boy, does that beta-glucan make that lowly bowl of oatmeal a powerhouse of good health!
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beta-glucan
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    Jan 01, 2010 6:15 PM GMT
    Beta-glucan sources in nature

    Some mushrooms, like Shiitake, naturally contain large amounts of beta-glucans.One of the most common sources of beta(1,3)D glucan for supplement use is derived from the cell wall of baker’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). However, beta-(1,3)(1,4) glucans are also extracted from the bran of some grains such as oats and barley, and to a much lesser degree in rye and wheat. The beta(1,3)D glucans from yeast are often insoluble. Those extracted from grains tend to be both soluble and insoluble. Other sources include some types of seaweed,[2] and various species of mushrooms such as Reishi, Shiitake, and Maitake.[3]

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    Jan 01, 2010 6:20 PM GMT
    This whole thread is just making me hungry. nom nom nom...
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    Jan 01, 2010 7:08 PM GMT
    chuckystud saidYep. Oatmeal lowers your cholesterol. In fact, any soluble fiber will.

    This has been well documented for many years.

    Oatmeal should be part of a sensible diet.

    You are right, Chucky. I skipped ahead to the lecture on Fiber. And the instructor said that any soluble fiber will lower the cholesterol. The bile will bind to any soluble fiber and be eliminated.
  • auryn

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    Jan 01, 2010 7:39 PM GMT
    I had a problem with high cholesterol recently and tried a lot of different things (short of cholesterol reducing drugs --I hate taking medications and only take what is necessary). Finally, as a last ditch effort, I started making the steel cut oats type of oatmeal and my bad cholesterol levels went down considerably.

    The steel cut oatmeal may take awhile to cook, but I like them better than the instant stuff now, especially when mixed with a little honey, sugar, and cinnamon. mmmmm
  • Hunter9

    Posts: 1039

    Jan 01, 2010 7:53 PM GMT
    chuckystud said
    Oatmeal should be part of a sensible diet.


    Yep, EVERY morning. one bowl of water-based Quaker Oatmeal with added wheat germ, wheat bran, flaxseed, peanut butter, whole egg, cinnamon (unsweetened), stevia, cocoa powder, vanilla extract and dried egg white powder.... dee-fucking-licious
  • camfer

    Posts: 891

    Jan 01, 2010 8:13 PM GMT
    Mmmm I wanna go to Hunter9's for breakfast.

    I cook rolled oats differently than many folks. If you follow the directions on the label you end up with mush or porridge. I like some texture so here's what I do. Boil a lot of water like you're making pasta, and put the oats in that. Just as the oats soften, in a minute or two, remove from the heat and drain. You end up with warm soft oat flakes, which for me is a much more appealing texture, and then you can doctor it up as you like. I made this for my family over thanksgiving week and they're all converts now.

  • Jan 01, 2010 8:43 PM GMT
    Auryn saidI had a problem with high cholesterol recently and tried a lot of different things (short of cholesterol reducing drugs --I hate taking medications and only take what is necessary). Finally, as a last ditch effort, I started making the steel cut oats type of oatmeal and my bad cholesterol levels went down considerably.

    The steel cut oatmeal may take awhile to cook, but I like them better than the instant stuff now, especially when mixed with a little honey, sugar, and cinnamon. mmmmm


    I love steel cut oatmeal!!! The texture is SO much better. But not a lot of stores carry it and I cant find it in bulk like rolled oats. For some reason it makes it really expensive (5 bucks for about 2 cups vs 7 bucks for 9 lbs of rolled oats)..

    but anyway, theres a secret to reducing the cook time of steel cut oats. Just soak them in water in a jar the night before, and it should cook A LOT faster!

    I have oatmeal every morning. I put golden raisins or blue berries, coconut flakes, and pumpkin spice in mine and I sweeten with agave nectar. The agave nectar cooking with the oatmeal smells heavenly. YUM YUM
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    Jan 01, 2010 9:09 PM GMT
    I add raisins, a banana, and cinnamon.

    Cinnamon slows the emptying of the stomach so your blood sugar doesnt go all loopy ...and the meal lasts with you longer, too.

    Off to the gym....
  • LifeByTheHorn

    Posts: 255

    Jan 01, 2010 10:05 PM GMT
    Oat meal is a source of life for me! I've even eaten it with tuna! You can create your own culinary innovations to vary it!
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    Jan 01, 2010 10:12 PM GMT
    Thanks. The lecture you mentioned is not free. Was this a plug?
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    Jan 01, 2010 10:24 PM GMT
    Oatmeal is flippin amazing!

    I have a bowl each morning unless I am short on time.

    I add some brown sugar, raisins and cinnamon....mmm.


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    Jan 01, 2010 10:26 PM GMT
    I just had a late lunch of smoked chicken and ribs (leftover famous daves from last night. MMMM GOOD!).

    If I eat this cornbread, it's going to soak up all of the cholesterol from the pork ribs, right?

    No?

    Crap.
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    Jan 01, 2010 11:12 PM GMT
    Caslon12000 saidBeta-glucan sources in nature
    However, beta-(1,3)(1,4) glucans are also extracted from the bran of some grains such as ... barley and to a much lesser degree in... wheat.
    Ahhhhh, I knew there was a logical and healthy reason to continue to enjoy beer! Thanks Caslon, you've made my day. Beer with a pinch of cinnamon
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19119

    Jan 01, 2010 11:15 PM GMT
    too bad Oatmeal cookies don't have the same effect icon_sad.gif
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    Jan 02, 2010 12:09 AM GMT
    uwsneil saidThanks. The lecture you mentioned is not free. Was this a plug?

    I mentioned this course when it was on sale on another thread: http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/765977

    I dont see any problem with sharing information sources with others. Hell, some piss and moan that we dont have enough of these kinds of discussions.

    Oh and by the way, for someone who had been on this site since '07, you should know that you arent allowed to address me directly until you reach 1000 posts. It's in the rules. Look it up. ... icon_wink.gif

    NO adress Caslon
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    Jan 02, 2010 7:21 PM GMT
    Interesting point I just learn in the fat lecture. The dietary cholesterol that you eat ...like in an egg... is of negligible effect on one's blood cholesterol. The liver manufactures cholesterol. The saturated fat and trans-fats in one's diet will increase the liver's production of cholesterol and be vastly more harmful in increasing the blood's cholesterol level.

    That egg, btw...has negligible saturated fat and will not switch on the liver's production of cholesterol.
  • auryn

    Posts: 2061

    Jan 02, 2010 8:55 PM GMT
    That's interesting info, Caslon.

    I guess I wonder if I should still feel bad about the bacon and egg sandwich that I just ate, though. mmmm eggs scrambled in bacon fat. mmmmm

    I'll be on the treadmill for, like, an hour today, to make up for it.
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    Feb 08, 2010 5:11 PM GMT
    Just read this old post. Interesting enough on theories. The fact is that generally speaking, eating oatmeal in the morning is aimed at replacing the typical bacon, ham and eggs diet every morning. Of course it will lower cholesterol – so will a glass of water in place of the typical morning breakfast. I have been eating steel cut oats since 1970. Stay the hell away from rolled oats because there is no nutrition in it. Rolling the oats takes away all nutritional elements and oils. You end up eating cooked chopped paper paste.

    A little advice to the ones that complain about steel cut oats taking longer to cook – just put the steel cut oats in a blender for a few seconds and the oats will cook in three to five minutes. To get the best deal on steel cut oats, by all means, buy it at a health food store where they sell it in bulk. I buy it for $1.10 a pound – cheap enough.
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    Feb 08, 2010 6:53 PM GMT
    markthespot saidJust read this old post. Interesting enough on theories. The fact is that generally speaking, eating oatmeal in the morning is aimed at replacing the typical bacon, ham and eggs diet every morning. Of course it will lower cholesterol – so will a glass of water in place of the typical morning breakfast. I have been eating steel cut oats since 1970. Stay the hell away from rolled oats because there is no nutrition in it. Rolling the oats takes away all nutritional elements and oils. You end up eating cooked chopped paper paste.

    A little advice to the ones that complain about steel cut oats taking longer to cook – just put the steel cut oats in a blender for a few seconds and the oats will cook in three to five minutes. To get the best deal on steel cut oats, by all means, buy it at a health food store where they sell it in bulk. I buy it for $1.10 a pound – cheap enough.

    Did you forget to take your dementia meds with that glass of water this morning? ... icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Feb 08, 2010 7:01 PM GMT
    Cas-

    Whole grains are great for cholesterol lowering. Don't get too obsessed with the science because it always changes. Yesterday's miracle is today's embarrassment. Indisputable though that a diet with whole grains, leafy vegetables, and unsaturated fats is the way to go. No need to talk about protein on this website. LOL.

    Seems to me that being obsessive about this stuff gets you nowhere. A healthy diet takes practice, but not the rigidity that people in the supplement and diet industries claim it does. Why take all the pleasure out of food? I seriously think all the focus on designer foods is a sign of our society's decline. Americans were a lot less fat when we didn't have so much to worry about.
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    Feb 08, 2010 7:04 PM GMT
    NNJfitandbi saidCas-

    Whole grains are great for cholesterol lowering. Don't get too obsessed with the science because it always changes. Yesterday's miracle is today's embarrassment. Indisputable though that a diet with whole grains, leafy vegetables, and unsaturated fats is the way to go. No need to talk about protein on this website. LOL.

    Seems to me that being obsessive about this stuff gets you nowhere. A healthy diet takes practice, but not the rigidity that people in the supplement and diet industries claim it does. Why take all the pleasure out of food? I seriously think all the focus on designer foods is a sign of our society's decline. Americans were a lot less fat when we didn't have so much to worry about.

    I like to know how something works so I can have confidence in any health claim.