The Death Penalty in the United States: FOR or AGAINST?

  • swimbikerun

    Posts: 2835

    Jan 03, 2010 6:16 PM GMT
    I am AGAINST the Death Penalty and as an American I'm ashamed of my country that such a barbaric practice is still considered "justice".
    No matter your opinion, please post your thoughts. If you are against the death penalty, I'd love to hear what steps you have taken to end this cruel practice in your state.
    Of course, if you are a death penalty lover bring out your best arguments and let's have at it!

    California can't afford the death penalty
    http://www.deathpenalty.org/
  • bottomline

    Posts: 331

    Jan 03, 2010 6:56 PM GMT
    Against...

    Even if one innocent individual is ever put to death by mistake( it has happened multiple times before) it isn't worth it no matter the cost we should pay to avoid that.( Even though it turns out to be cheaper to keep them)
    I don't trust the justice system or the public for that matter with such decisions. Death penalty has to be banished every where around the world.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 03, 2010 6:59 PM GMT
    I would vote to eliminate the death penalty.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 03, 2010 7:44 PM GMT
    swimbikerun saidI am AGAINST the Death Penalty and as an American I'm ashamed of my country that such a barbaric practice is still considered "justice".
    No matter your opinion, please post your thoughts. If you are against the death penalty, I'd love to hear what steps you have taken to end this cruel practice in your state.
    Of course, if you are a death penalty lover bring out your best arguments and let's have at it!

    California can't afford the death penalty
    http://www.deathpenalty.org/


    For people who are not sorry for their crimes of murder and even laugh about all the people they have killed, the death penalty is appropriate. It's the most humane thing you can do for them when they refuse to see anything wrong with what they did. You can not release people like that back into society. To keep such people in prison for the rest of their life, seems very inhumane and a total waste of everyone's tax dollars. Some people who fall in this camp are the terrorists who are only sorry that they got caught and not that they killed anyone and, if you let them out of prison, they will do it again and the next time they will not screw up their suicidal terroristic mission.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 03, 2010 7:56 PM GMT
    I heard the guy who screwed up in Detroit will only get a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison and with parole, he will probably get out ealier, so that the next time he can do it again and not screw up and succeed in his suicidal terroristic mission. When his charges were read to him in the hospital from a burnt cock, he smiled and laughed. I guess if you want to put people like that back into society, so that this time he can succeed, go ahead. But don't cry next time when it's your family, friends, or relatives that he blows up and kills.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 03, 2010 7:56 PM GMT
    G_Force said
    swimbikerun saidI am AGAINST the Death Penalty and as an American I'm ashamed of my country that such a barbaric practice is still considered "justice".
    No matter your opinion, please post your thoughts. If you are against the death penalty, I'd love to hear what steps you have taken to end this cruel practice in your state.
    Of course, if you are a death penalty lover bring out your best arguments and let's have at it!

    California can't afford the death penalty
    http://www.deathpenalty.org/


    For people who are not sorry for their crimes of murder and even laugh about all the people they have killed, the death penalty is appropriate. It's the most humane thing you can do for them when they refuse to see anything wrong with what they did. You can not release people like that back into society. To keep such people in prison for the rest of their life, seems very inhumane and a total waste of everyone's tax dollars. Some people who fall in this camp are the terrorists who are only sorry that they got caught and not that they killed anyone and, if you let them out of prison, they will do it again and the next time they will not screw up their suicidal terroristic mission.


    YOu (a Christian) would kill the person and take away any possiblity of them accepting Jesus? That seems a bit inconsistant to me. If "finding the Lord" is the most important thing one can do in this life it really strikes me as odd that you would be in such a rush to away that possiblity of redemption.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 03, 2010 7:59 PM GMT
    G_Force saidI heard the guy who screwed up in Detroit will only get a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison and with parole, he will probably get out ealier, so that the next time he can do it again and not screw up and succeed in his suicidal terroristic mission. When his charges were read to him in the hospital from a burnt cock, he smiled and laughed. I guess if you want to put people like that back into society, so that this time he can succeed, go ahead. But don't cry next when it's your family, friends, or relatives that he blows up and kills.


    One can be infavor ot life in prison with any possilbity of parole AND still be against the Death Penality. I always find it inconsistant when Christians are in favor of the Death Penality. On this position I have to give the Catholic Church the point for being the most well thought out "Christian veiwpoint".
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 03, 2010 8:05 PM GMT
    phemt said
    G_Force said
    swimbikerun saidI am AGAINST the Death Penalty and as an American I'm ashamed of my country that such a barbaric practice is still considered "justice".
    No matter your opinion, please post your thoughts. If you are against the death penalty, I'd love to hear what steps you have taken to end this cruel practice in your state.
    Of course, if you are a death penalty lover bring out your best arguments and let's have at it!

    California can't afford the death penalty
    http://www.deathpenalty.org/


    For people who are not sorry for their crimes of murder and even laugh about all the people they have killed, the death penalty is appropriate. It's the most humane thing you can do for them when they refuse to see anything wrong with what they did. You can not release people like that back into society. To keep such people in prison for the rest of their life, seems very inhumane and a total waste of everyone's tax dollars. Some people who fall in this camp are the terrorists who are only sorry that they got caught and not that they killed anyone and, if you let them out of prison, they will do it again and the next time they will not screw up their suicidal terroristic mission.


    YOu (a Christian) would kill the person and take away any possiblity of them accepting Jesus? That seems a bit inconsistant to me. If "finding the Lord" is the most important thing one can do in this life it really strikes me as odd that you would be in such a rush to away that possiblity of redemption.


    No, I won't kill him. The government, as one of God's representatives will kill him for the protection of the lives of thousands of people. He will have plenty of opportunity to think about what he did and repent to God before God takes his life through his representatives, the governement.

    Please see this link about God, government, and law enforcement:

    http://www.christiancops.org/romans13.htm
  • creature

    Posts: 5197

    Jan 03, 2010 8:06 PM GMT
    For.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 03, 2010 8:09 PM GMT
    I admit I go back in forth on this issue. In the end though I am agaisnt it. Reason: (1) the possiblity of killing an innocent person without being able to "correct that mistake". (2) The justice system should remove dangerous people from society, but it is not the place of the justice system to act on emotional desire for revenge.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 03, 2010 8:11 PM GMT
    G_Force said
    phemt said
    G_Force said
    swimbikerun saidI am AGAINST the Death Penalty and as an American I'm ashamed of my country that such a barbaric practice is still considered "justice".
    No matter your opinion, please post your thoughts. If you are against the death penalty, I'd love to hear what steps you have taken to end this cruel practice in your state.
    Of course, if you are a death penalty lover bring out your best arguments and let's have at it!

    California can't afford the death penalty
    http://www.deathpenalty.org/


    For people who are not sorry for their crimes of murder and even laugh about all the people they have killed, the death penalty is appropriate. It's the most humane thing you can do for them when they refuse to see anything wrong with what they did. You can not release people like that back into society. To keep such people in prison for the rest of their life, seems very inhumane and a total waste of everyone's tax dollars. Some people who fall in this camp are the terrorists who are only sorry that they got caught and not that they killed anyone and, if you let them out of prison, they will do it again and the next time they will not screw up their suicidal terroristic mission.


    YOu (a Christian) would kill the person and take away any possiblity of them accepting Jesus? That seems a bit inconsistant to me. If "finding the Lord" is the most important thing one can do in this life it really strikes me as odd that you would be in such a rush to away that possiblity of redemption.


    No, I won't kill him. The government, as one of God's representatives will kill him for the protection of the lives of thousands of people. He will have plenty of opportunity to think about what he did and repent to God before God takes his life through his representatives, the governement.

    Please see this link about God, government, and law enforcement:

    http://www.christiancops.org/romans13.htm


    The gov't is acting on your behalf. I am heading out so will have to read your link later.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 03, 2010 8:21 PM GMT
    phemt saidI admit I go back in forth on this issue. In the end though I am agaisnt it. Reason: (1) the possiblity of killing an innocent person without being able to "correct that mistake". (2) The justice system should remove dangerous people from society, but it is not the place of the justice system to act on emotional desire for revenge.


    If our government would decide to implement capital punishment, I don't believe they want to implement it for revenge on the criminal, but rather for the protection of the lives of everyone else. There may be just and legimate reasons why they feel someone should not ever be released into society again and just to keep them in prison all their life, seems rather a waste of everyone's tax dollars. Our prisons are already overcrowded and are becoming a safety and health issue for everyone in them and there is no money to build any more. To keep people in prison all their life just seems rather stupid to me. And if it is felt these people can not be released into society for the safety and lives of everyone, then God does not object to the use of captial punishment for the safety of everyone.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 03, 2010 8:23 PM GMT
    phemt said
    G_Force said
    phemt said
    G_Force said
    swimbikerun saidI am AGAINST the Death Penalty and as an American I'm ashamed of my country that such a barbaric practice is still considered "justice".
    No matter your opinion, please post your thoughts. If you are against the death penalty, I'd love to hear what steps you have taken to end this cruel practice in your state.
    Of course, if you are a death penalty lover bring out your best arguments and let's have at it!

    California can't afford the death penalty
    http://www.deathpenalty.org/


    For people who are not sorry for their crimes of murder and even laugh about all the people they have killed, the death penalty is appropriate. It's the most humane thing you can do for them when they refuse to see anything wrong with what they did. You can not release people like that back into society. To keep such people in prison for the rest of their life, seems very inhumane and a total waste of everyone's tax dollars. Some people who fall in this camp are the terrorists who are only sorry that they got caught and not that they killed anyone and, if you let them out of prison, they will do it again and the next time they will not screw up their suicidal terroristic mission.


    YOu (a Christian) would kill the person and take away any possiblity of them accepting Jesus? That seems a bit inconsistant to me. If "finding the Lord" is the most important thing one can do in this life it really strikes me as odd that you would be in such a rush to away that possiblity of redemption.


    No, I won't kill him. The government, as one of God's representatives will kill him for the protection of the lives of thousands of people. He will have plenty of opportunity to think about what he did and repent to God before God takes his life through his representatives, the governement.

    Please see this link about God, government, and law enforcement:

    http://www.christiancops.org/romans13.htm


    The gov't is acting on your behalf. I am heading out so will have to read your link later.


    Yes, governements do act by the authority we give them. But that authority they have and that is given to them by us ultimately comes from God because God is the highest authority. God works through all legally established governments. All people living today by their citizenship are under some form of legal government and are subject to those governments in ALL things. The ONLY time we are not to obey them is if they order us to do something, which is against God himself, who is the highest authority. In this case the words of Scripture appy, "We must obey God rather than men." But just because the government may allow certain behaviors that God doesn't approve in the Scriptures (i.e abortion), does NOT mean Christians can refuse to pay their taxes to this goverment or do not have to respect and honor this government. They still are to respect and honor this government and pay any taxes owed. However, there is nothing wrong with peaceably in the framework of governmental laws voicing your disapproval of laws or things you feel the government is not doing right or is even doing wrong against God's laws and electing politicians who will best rule according to Scripture. God does NOT EVER approve Christians blowing up abortion clinics. These would be sins against the 7th commandment (destruction of someone's property) and 5th commandment ( murder).
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 03, 2010 9:31 PM GMT
    phemt saidI admit I go back in forth on this issue. In the end though I am agaisnt it. Reason: (1) the possiblity of killing an innocent person without being able to "correct that mistake". (2) The justice system should remove dangerous people from society, but it is not the place of the justice system to act on emotional desire for revenge.


    I would only recommend the death penalty for serious crimes (i.e murder) where the crimimal has admitted to doing those crimes or the evidence confirms without a doubt the murders committed by him and he has no remorse for commiting any of the murder he did. If he shows remorse and it appears he is really sorry for what he did and publicly expreses that remorse to the victims families and everyone else, I believe then he should be given an appropriate prison sentence for the crimes committed and given another chance to show that his remorse is genuine by releasing him back into society, but helping him to begin his life anew with helping him get employment to support himself and keeping close monitoring of his life that he is fitting back into society in a good and meaningful purposeful way.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 04, 2010 1:49 AM GMT
    bottomline said Against...

    Even if one innocent individual is ever put to death by mistake( it has happened multiple times before) it isn't worth it no matter the cost we should pay to avoid that.( Even though it turns out to be cheaper to keep them)
    I don't trust the justice system or the public for that matter with such decisions. Death penalty has to be banished every where around the world.


    BottomLine,
    In reading up on this before voting in the state I use to live on this issue I read that there is no evidence that anyone in the US has been found innocent after being given the death penalty. Please provide links if you know that to be wrong.

    While I have always personally said I was FOR the death penalty, when it came to actually having to vote to restore it in our state, I couldn't vote for it. So I don't know if that means I am now AGAINST it or not. I am not out to change states that already have it, but I also didn't want the "blood on my hands" either, so to speak. Just being honest, I know it sounds lame, but I guess I really haven't decided totally yet.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 04, 2010 1:52 AM GMT
    phemt said
    G_Force saidI heard the guy who screwed up in Detroit will only get a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison and with parole, he will probably get out ealier, so that the next time he can do it again and not screw up and succeed in his suicidal terroristic mission. When his charges were read to him in the hospital from a burnt cock, he smiled and laughed. I guess if you want to put people like that back into society, so that this time he can succeed, go ahead. But don't cry next when it's your family, friends, or relatives that he blows up and kills.


    One can be infavor ot life in prison with any possilbity of parole AND still be against the Death Penality. I always find it inconsistant when Christians are in favor of the Death Penality. On this position I have to give the Catholic Church the point for being the most well thought out "Christian veiwpoint".


    If you mean inconsistant because Christians are pro-life in abortion but for the death penalty, the difference is simple.

    The belief is that abortion is murder of an INNOCENT life, but the death penalty is murder of a person GUILTY of something terrible.

    Personally I find it inconsistant to be pro-choice but anti death penalty. Can someone explan that?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 04, 2010 2:41 AM GMT

    Then there is this....

    "The Criminal Code defines murder as killing someone where the killer meant to cause the person's death or meant to cause bodily harm that was likely to result in their death."

    One of the ten commandments, "Thou shalt not commit murder." There is no caveat that says, 'Unless they deserve it".

    Whether it is state sanctioned or whether or not the person is a criminal/murderer makes no difference to that commandment.


    A better punishment, to us, is for the murderer to have to live out their existence in incarceration without the benefit of TV, free university etc etc etc.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14352

    Jan 04, 2010 9:13 PM GMT
    I am somewhat divided on this issue. Granted the death penalty helps rid society of the most unremorseful, violent predators but at the same token states that have the death penalty still have persitant problems with violent crime. So much for the death penalty cutting down on violent crime like most tough on crime right wing conservatives had us believing. I don't trust the judicial system because horrendous mistakes have been made resulting in the wrong person being put to death. Some states like Texas are too over zealous with the death penalty and I find that disturbing.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 05, 2010 1:26 AM GMT
    meninlove said
    Then there is this....

    "The Criminal Code defines murder as killing someone where the killer meant to cause the person's death or meant to cause bodily harm that was likely to result in their death."

    One of the ten commandments, "Thou shalt not commit murder." There is no caveat that says, 'Unless they deserve it".

    Whether it is state sanctioned or whether or not the person is a criminal/murderer makes no difference to that commandment.


    A better punishment, to us, is for the murderer to have to live out their existence in incarceration without the benefit of TV, free university etc etc etc.


    Capital punishment is not murder. A state government that uses capital punishment is not gulity of murder. See Romans 13. There is a good reason why capital punishment is sometimes used to protect human life.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 05, 2010 1:36 AM GMT
    meninlove said
    Then there is this....

    "The Criminal Code defines murder as killing someone where the killer meant to cause the person's death or meant to cause bodily harm that was likely to result in their death."

    One of the ten commandments, "Thou shalt not commit murder." There is no caveat that says, 'Unless they deserve it".

    Whether it is state sanctioned or whether or not the person is a criminal/murderer makes no difference to that commandment.


    A better punishment, to us, is for the murderer to have to live out their existence in incarceration without the benefit of TV, free university etc etc etc.


    Most prisons are already overcrowded and to keep people in prison for the rest of their life seems more inhumane and a waste of everyone's tax dollars. You certainly can not let these people into society to go and kill some more people. How many people are you going to let them kill? Pretty soon the government is going to have to take half of your income in order to pay for everything we want them do, including build more prisons to house all these people you want to incarserate and pay for their support.
  • rdberg1957

    Posts: 662

    Jan 05, 2010 7:32 AM GMT
    The US has way too many people in prison. We imprison more than any other nation in the world. However, the death penalty is no solution to overcrowded prisons. Our judicial system is better than some, but our penal system is bad news. We don't help people to return to society upon release. It's no surprise when felons can't find a place to live or get a job that they end up re-offending.

    There are times when I feel angry enough about a crime to consider the death penalty, but overall, I think the death penalty is a bad idea. I think it makes society more barbaric, colder and less humane.
  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Jan 05, 2010 11:22 AM GMT
    There was an article in the NY Times yesterday
    about how the number of death sentences has reached an all time low right now ..... not seen since 1976
    They attributed it to - the cost
    It's very expensive to sentence someone to death
    and because of the number of people who in the past have been sentenced and later were exonerated

    For me if there is the chance that an innocent person is put to death then it is not worth it
  • Koaa2

    Posts: 1556

    Jan 05, 2010 12:22 PM GMT
    I support it for those who continually ask if they would do something with the person above or below them on RJ!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 05, 2010 4:17 PM GMT

    I've been all over the place on this one.

    In college I had no objection to the death penalty per se on moral grounds, though I was bothered by the possibility that innocent people could be executed. So I was against the death penalty in its current form, but would have supported a system that would reduce to near zero the probability of executing an innocent person. I had in mind something like an expanded list of capital crimes with a requirement that, in order to be subject to capital punishment, a person would have to be found guilty and deserving of the death penalty for three such crimes committed at different times.

    Then I was briefly against the death penalty on the grounds that murder is murder - whether committed by individuals of the state. That argument fell apart when I accepted that there can be such a thing as 'just war' in which people die and so the State may sometimes be able to commit morally sanctioned homicide.

    The defining experience for me grew out of some work I was encouraged to do with death row inmates. (When I lived in London, I worked with the Samaritans as a counselor. When I moved to NYC my schedule didn't allow me commit to the hours needed to be a counselor, but I was put in touch with Befriender's International, which, among other things, organizes pen pals for death row prisoners.

    I have learned much from this experience. First, that people can change. The three prisoners with whom I have corresponded undoubtedly committed heinous crimes - many years ago. But I have complete confidence that two out of the three are fundamentally changed men. They understand what they did, are deeply remorseful (and always will be) and make no argument that they should be spared punishment (such as permanent incarceration). The third is younger and has not accepted his responsibility for what he did, but I believe that in time he will.

    I have also seen that living with a death sentence is a form of slow torture. Two of the three prisoners I have worked with have come very close to execution on more than one occasion - only to receive stays.

    No doubt incarceration (especially in maximum security facilities) is very expensive in financial terms, but so is the death penalty. And abandonment of the death penalty in favor of life imprisonment allows us to avoid the possibility of executing the innocent, having to live with the clear inequities of who gets executed (usually poor people and especially poor black people). Most importantly, it allows us to remain true to the belief that with time and reflection people can change and,even behind bars, find some meaning in their life and maybe even contribute to the benefit of others.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 06, 2010 1:04 AM GMT
    I agree with the notion of the death penalty. A murderer forfeits his or her life when he or she takes another. Removing a dangerous person from society protects that society.

    However, in practice the death penalty can cause problems. There is a chance an innocent person can be executed. If the prisoner, instead, was in prison for life there is a chance that future evidence can free them.

    Second, putting a person to death typically costs the state more than a person serving life in prison.

    Maybe putting a person in a cell with a noose hanging in the middle would be an easy solution. If they want to hang themselves and end their term, they may. But if they truly are innocent, hope in their innocence being discovered would keep them from making that choice on a day to day basis.